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A bit more help, and asking for Reference advice!


Dpaul7

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I am so happy with the help I received earlier today!

Here are just a few more Aurora, North Carolina fossils.  I have some ideas on a couple, but I cannot make an exact match!

 

#1 and 2:  The same specimen, showing each side.  I am wondering if it is not a bone fragment? I know whale and fossil bone pieces are found here!

 

#3:  I believe it i some type of Murex - but I cannot match it exactly, other than I think it is a Whelk!

 

#4:  I Pelecypod - I was never very good with these!

 

#5:  Another pelecypod; I am thinking Nucula!

 

#6 & 7:  Two views of the same fossil; it LOOKS like murchisonia, except that I think they were extinct by the time these fossils were made!

 

#8:  Another similar gastropod.

 

#9 & #10 - Sorry for the bad quality, these were made with my computer microscope! 

 

#11 & 12:  Some type of claw?

 

Now, a REALLY important question:  I REALLY like invertebrate fossils - because that is what I can find near me!  I have nice references for those!  They are free from the State of Pennsylvania.  (I will be happy to upload if anyone wants).  I also have the AUdobon Guide to Fossils - and the Smithsonian Fossil Guide.

I have downloaded some wonderful (and free) OLD books - some of which really are still useful in many cases - A Dictionary of the Fossils of Pennsylvania VOL I, II and III. (Free for download, they are out of copyright - However so much has changed for many areas - STILL useful to help identify)  I have references that help me with the Alabama formations, and British Columbia ones. 

 

What GENERAL references you you folks recommend?  In my main collecting field, (Coins - Ancient, modern, medieval) we always tell new collectors BUY THE BOOK FIRST.  I have even authored 9 or 10 coin books myself!  So - I realize this advice about books applies here as well!  What are your favorite references?  For Gastropods - Trilobites - Brachiopods - Pelecypods, etc. All recommendations are welcome!

 

Again, many thanks!  I am happy that I am returning to something I loved as a young person! And I appreciate this wonderful group so much!


Dpaul7

 

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Dpaul7...

 

I have links to literally thousands of free (non-pay-per-view) pdf files on a wide variety of topics in my pdf library here on The Fossil Forum.  Here is a LINK to the Table of Contents.  Knock yourself OUT!

 

-Joe

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Joe - MANY THANKS!  It will be most helpful!  And I love your "motto" - illigitimati non carborundum!  I had that on my wall in my office when I was working!

 

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They seem to be working now, doushantuo.  There was an 'issue' with this post a little while ago.

 

-Joe

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If you close your browser and open it again probably you will not see any pictures. Topic was indexed by Google, but no images in the cached version. :wacko:

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I don’t see any pictures either.

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The first price looks suspiciously like a mammal tooth, can you provide pictures of the surface where it’s broken?

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Seashells!!! :D

 

So, here is what I think (I can't see the pictures in the first post either, so those are according to the reply just above):

  • Pics 1-2: * rodent tooth? Will need to know the exact size to know from what animal it might be from. @Harry Pristis knows everything about mammal bones and teeth, he'll be of good help to you for that one.
  • Pic 3: * I think a murex shell indeed... Maybe Acantholabia? @MikeR is more familiar with the American species. 
  • Pic 4: bivalve of either the Cardiidae family or the Carditidae family (beware, the two are often confused!). But in order to tell,, the shell has to be prepped (remove the excess matrix) and a picture of the hinge area is crucially needed.
  • Pic 5: that's an astarte seashell (bivalve), of the species Astarte concentrica. A nice one too!
  • Pics 6-7-8: turritella shells, I'm pretty sure that the species is Turritella mansfieldi
  • Pics 9-10: pictures are very blurry and don't show the whole shell. Also, I'm pretty sure it's broken, and it seems to be pretty worn, so it's gonna be very hard pinning this one down to a family...
  • Pics 11-12: * that does seem to be a piece of bone, Harry will be able to tell you more about it too. 

I strongly suggest you take more pictures, from different angles, with a scale, of the items I marked with a red asterisk *. And prepping (with a toothpick or metal needle) the bivalve in pic 4 is also very useful to do before taking pictures of it. 

 

Oh, and for info: Pelecypoda is the old name. Now they are called Bivalvia, the bivalves (because they are always made of two valves, which open and close). Bivalves are my favorite type of fossils (and modern seashells too) :)

 

Best regards,

 

Max

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Thanks, Max Dereme - I SHOULD use bivalve... Pelecypod was when I was young! 

59 minutes ago, Max-fossils said:

Pics 9-10: pictures are very blurry and don't show the whole shell. Also, I'm pretty sure it's broken, and it seems to be pretty worn, so it's gonna be very hard pinning this one down to a family...

These were taken with my computer microscope, with a SMALL field.  It is a VERY small piece, and not broken, I think, just would not fit.  It is difficult to focus properly, and needs stronger light! Will attempt a photo with my camera on MACRO. And thanks again! 

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20 minutes ago, Dpaul7 said:

Thanks, Max Dereme - I SHOULD use bivalve... Pelecypod was when I was young! 

These were taken with my computer microscope, with a SMALL field.  It is a VERY small piece, and not broken, I think, just would not fit.  It is difficult to focus properly, and needs stronger light! Will attempt a photo with my camera on MACRO. And thanks again! 

Alright, looking forward to pictures :)

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1 and 2 look like marine reptile bone to me. What’s the geological age there?

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JohnBrewer - Miocene age - and the area IS known for whale bone and dolphin bone fossils!

 

I am going to try to make an accurate measurement grid background to photograph on!

 

DR

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:blink:GOOD GRIEF!  Picture 1 & 2 DID NOT belong with this group, I added them in error.  That is a Dimetrodon limbatus sail spine section.  How embarrassing! :wacko:

 

BUT I DO have a bone fragment from Aurora - and will picture here and now, along with other "improvement" (I hope) photos.

 

#1 and 2 are the claw-like fossil... #3 and 4 are the shell in question - hopefully showing the valve.... #5 & 6 ARE what I believe is a bone fragment.... #7 and 8 is the tiny shell  (which I had to search for on hands and knees because the cats jumped up on the photo table).

 

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The shells are more than likely from the Lower Pleistocene James City Formation, however since they are small they could be from the Chowan River Formation as well.  For Lee Creek Mine Shells the best reference is Ward and Blackwelder's paper "Late Pliocene and Early Pleistocene Mollusca from the James City and Chowan River Formations at the Lee Creek Mine"  in Part 2 of the Geology and Paleontology of the Lee Creek Mine series.

 

From your first set of pictures starting with the second pic

Busycon carica

Cyclocardia granulata

Astarte concentrica

Both turritellas are T. perexilis

The broken shell maybe an Oliva or Olivella

 

Mike

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MikeR - Many thanks for your help! I do appreciate it.  ALSO for the tip on the reference material - I have downloaded, and will study it!

 

My sister got these in Aurora - Probably from the "Pungo Pits" across from the fossil  museum.

You mention the formations - I had been under the impression it was Pungo River and Yorktown formations in Aurora. I will correct!!!!

 

I do love shell fossils; and hope to dig some locally in Spring!

 

 

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3 minutes ago, Dpaul7 said:

MikeR - Many thanks for your help! I do appreciate it.  ALSO for the tip on the reference material - I have downloaded, and will study it!

 

My sister got these in Aurora - Probably from the "Pungo Pits" across from the fossil  museum.

You mention the formations - I had been under the impression it was Pungo River and Yorktown formations in Aurora. I will correct!!!!

 

I do love shell fossils; and hope to dig some locally in Spring!

 

 

 

The verts, ecphora and chesapecten come from the Pungo River and Yorktown but most of the well preserved shell is James City.  It will all be explained in the reference.

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