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Daniel Frew

Posting for a friend

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Daniel Frew

Found in a field in northwest Arkansas. Said they have come across a few of them in the area.

 

Dan

fr.jpg

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GeschWhat

Interesting :popcorn:

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ynot

What size is it?

Can We see other views?

I think it is a stromatolite, but more pictures may change that opinion.

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Herb

looks something like a different kind of cone-in-cone pressure structure

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Daniel Frew

They said it was `12" across and ~2" thick. Looks the same on both sides.

 

2" thick around the edge and thicker in the middle.

 

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Daniel Frew

cp.jpg

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ynot

From the side view it looks like a concretion with shale adhered to it. (BUT IT IS NOT {see Piranha's post below.})

Sometimes shale / slate can develop this type of lens, that is harder than the surrounding rock.

Could have a fossil inside, but may not.

Edited by ynot
Because I missed the id

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Tidgy's Dad

Yes, looks like a shale nodule to me. 

Boudinage or something like it perhaps causes this ?

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Sagebrush Steve
19 hours ago, GeschWhat said:

Interesting :popcorn:

What are you waiting around for?  You’re supposed to say “that’s petrified cow poop.”   :)

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ynot
6 minutes ago, piranha said:

The UO paleobotanist responded:

 

 

This appears to be a permineralized cycad, probably Eocene.  It is a stunning and very significant specimen, probably a new genus and species.

Never would have thunk it.

 

20 hours ago, Daniel Frew said:

Found in a field in northwest Arkansas. Said they have come across a few of them in the area.

You should take one to a local paleontologist (museum or university).

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piranha
9 minutes ago, ynot said:

...You should take one to a local paleontologist (museum or university).

 

 

Contact info sent via PM :fistbump:

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abyssunder

This is a Bennettitales (cycadeoid) squashed by later compression, for comparison, from the Sedgwick Museum's collection. Note the reproductive structures embedded amongst the leaf bases. A "pineapple-like" set of leaves would have emerged from the top.

 

Bennettitales_stump_top.thumb.JPG.6598d13e8ccca1e819ee970df362978e.JPGBennettitales_stump_side.thumb.JPG.ca489a5eec76768c0fe485c4698c0ba2.JPG

images from here

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Daniel Frew

Thanks everyone! Passed the information on.

 

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GeschWhat
7 hours ago, Sagebrush Steve said:

What are you waiting around for?  You’re supposed to say “that’s petrified cow poop.”

Didn't look like poop - just really, really interesting! :D

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