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ynot

Is this a Physogaleus "contortus" symphyseal?

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ynot

Hey Folks,

Got this tooth in the spoils pile at the Aurora Fossil museum.

I think it is a Physogaleus contortus  symphyseal tooth, looking for confirmation or alternatives.

It is 1/2 inch on slant.

aa2.png.e6575124ae3663d869cc1c8bc6fa2ee7.pngaa3.png.30c5ca2b6c812ca7ec7b600e09e95fdd.png5a1c9f9f31395_mossagate-0012.png.cae8b0f8552632ac444153b16201211f.png5a1c9fa794554_mossagate-0013.png.76f4a132e0f3899177138f6ecd971857.png5a1c9fb55da39_mossagate-0016.png.e7706683679bd9e1025294fcb81f0bbf.png5a1ca01bb7218_mossagateb-0001.png.24ef958a062ca01e378400ac0beb8c5d.png

 

Thanks,

Tony

 

PS @MarcoSr, @siteseer, @sixgill pete, @Al Dente

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sixgill pete

@ynot Tony, it could be. I would really like to see a full on side view with the root straight up. Without the clip you are using to hold it. But based on what I see so far I would say most likely it is.

 

Now, you were at Aurora?

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ynot
1 minute ago, sixgill pete said:

Now, you were at Aurora?

In October 2014, just after I joined the Forum.

I spent 3 days there. (Just went through the finds to see if I had missed anything that would stand out to Me now that I have learned so much here since joining.)

 

Thanks @sixgill pete

PS It may take a while to get the picture You requested.

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ynot

@sixgill pete Here are the additional pictures....

DSCF5487.JPG.4f8132329da987fdd282dcc7d0a6a2ca.JPGDSCF5488.JPG.fe1a23e7cf29a8381398dc58391acba1.JPG

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MarcoSr

Tony

The genus Physogaleus is in the order Carcharhiniformes and based upon Compagno 1988 medial teeth (see below) are present in most extant species of the order except in some Scyliorhinids and Triakids.  So I would expect medial teeth (what you are calling symphyseal teeth) in Physogaleus.

 

5a1d814ac03c1_Compagnodefinitions1a.jpg.03418bd530740e1cd190947f3302cedc.jpg

 

 

5a1d82e494110_Compagnodefinitions2a.jpg.30e9a75c2411455fd92d89d2d7121863.jpg

 

Your tooth has the features (the serrations and especially the root) and size (smaller than other teeth in the dentition, but not very much smaller like in Carcharhinus species) of what I would expect for a medial tooth in Physogaleus contortus.  If you look closely at other positions of Physogaleus contortus you will see on some teeth the ends of the root curve upward like on your tooth.  Although there are other possibilities (I hate to id teeth from pictures no matter how good) I think your tooth is a Physogaleus contortus medial tooth.  I would not have had the same opinion based on just the original pictures which you posted.  The additional pictures changed my mind.

 

Marco Sr.

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ynot
2 hours ago, MarcoSr said:

I think your tooth is a Physogaleus contortus medial tooth. 

Thank You Marco.

Especially for the wonderful explanation!!:thumbsu:

 

Respectfully,

Tony

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siteseer

Hi Tony,

 

I've been looking at this tooth since yesterday.  I have seen a tooth like it identified as a Physogaleus contortus symphyseal/medial.  The crown seems rather flat and blade-like (usually with more of a tapering cusp with at least a slight twist) but that tooth position can vary in morphology.  It looks like the root had more of a lingual protuberance but it was worn away and that helps push it toward being a P. contortus tooth.  I might be more open to the possibility that it's a Carcharhinus or a Galeocerdo tooth, but as Marco Sr. observed, that side view sure looks more Physogaleus - looks like a lower tooth too.

 

When shooting shark teeth, always go for a straight on labial and lingual view.  A side view is always a plus.  I liked that you included the apical (top) view.  I know it can be difficult to get a tooth to sit still for photos.  Fossil photographers use a tacky gum for that - something that sticks but doesn't leave a hard-to-clean residue.

 

Jess

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ynot
22 minutes ago, siteseer said:

, that side view sure looks more Physogaleus - looks like a lower tooth too.

Thanks Jess!

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