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Crazyhen

Dinosaur eggs from Guizhou

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Crazyhen

Are these dinosaur eggs?  They are from Guizhou, China.  About 18cm long.  Possibly eggs of Sauropods?

582BAACF-E2ED-4508-98DD-BFFCCE07BC34.jpeg

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62A57CFF-6477-481C-8FFA-31CE47740B13.jpeg

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ynot

Yes they are eggs.

Lets see what @-Andy- and @Troodon have to say about them.

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Troodon

@HamptonsDoc

 

Look like real dinosaur eggs and very poorly prepped.  They are not Sauropod and may belong to a Theropod, it's unknown.  They are similar to protoceratopsid eggs but longer and wider. Eggs are described by their eggshell and classified into Oogenera not by dinosaur family.

 

Forgot classification: my guess is  Macrooolithus Group E1

 

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-Andy-

Fascinating. I have never seen this kind of egg from China.

 

Their surface texture and size reminds me of theropod, but I am quite sure they are not the typical Oviraptorid eggs as their shapes are much closer to Prismatoolithus (Troodontinae). I do not see the typical cracking of other Chinese theropod eggs.

 

I have no idea what they are. Thomas Kapitany of Crystal World can give you a better answer.

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Crazyhen

And how about this clutch of eggs?

F69164B3-C38D-43F9-9074-1C020D550FFD.jpeg

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Troodon

What is the size of the eggs and did someone put a coating on the clutch 

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-Andy-

The eggs look wet. Maybe someone splashed them to highlight their features?

 

And yes, we need to know their size.

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Crazyhen
1 hour ago, Troodon said:

What is the size of the eggs and did someone put a coating on the clutch 

About 12cm, it’s wet with water, presumably to highlight its features.  The oval eggs are also from Guizhou.

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-Andy-

I don't think there's a way we can accurately ID these eggs without seeing them in person, or contacting an expert in China.

 

The common Chinese dinosaur eggs are either from Henan Province, or Guangdong. Secondly, your eggs are smaller than the average hadrosaur egg, and bigger than the average segnosaur egg.

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indominus rex

I think that the first oval shaped eggs are theropod eggs and the second image of the cluster of eggs are possibly that of a hadrosaur. I am not sure though.

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Troodon

 The eggs in last clutch are much too small to be standard hadrosaur type that we see sold but fit dendroolithus or spheroolithus morphology slightly oval and 12 cm.  To try to speculate beyond that is a reach since we do not know the specific age or formation they were collected in.   I can say it's a very nice clutch that I would love to have them in my collection. 

 

Edit:

Found this in a paper.  Is Ganzhou same as Ginzhou?

Nanxiong Fm.:  The redbeds of the Nanxiong Basin, Guangdong, may be divided into an upper and lower formations, for the lower section of the Nanxiong Fm. produces such forms as dinosaurs, turtles, and fossil eggs.  The upper section's Luofozhai member produces Middle to Late Paleocene Amblypoda. The lower unit contains such elements as  Nanhshiungochelys wachingensis, Microhadrosaurus nanshiungensis, Nanshingosaurus brevispinus,  Tyrannosauridae indet., Coelurosauria indet.,  Oolithes elongatus, O. spheroidas, O. rugustus,  and  O. nanshingensis.   Fossil preservation in the Nanxiong Fm. is fragmentary, but undoubtedly the Fm. belongs to the Upper Cretaceous based upon the presence of hadrosaurs and tyrannosaurs.  C.C. Young conducted detailed research upon the fossil eggs and believed the egg-producing lithologies at Nanxiong and Ganzhou belonged to the upper Upper Cretaceous.

 

Dong_80.pdf

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Troodon

Did some research on that formation and a couple of candidates appear and Spheroolthus is a possible candidate for that clutch.  Let me point out that the fossil record is not very extensive.

 

Screenshot_20171203-040046.thumb.jpg.59e3e09d79cbcc4e0eea23d2b5dc41d5.jpg

 

10.1.1.511.9640.pdf

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steelhead9

Maybe citipati on the first 2 eggs?

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HamptonsDoc

Wow, where did you find this first pair!?! Andy and Troodon are spot on with their assessments. The first pair looks similar to Protoceratopsid but are a little too big.  The largest of the protoceratopsid eggs are about 13-15cm in length (P2 group); these are from the Djadokhta Formation. Can you get more pictures that are close ups of the shell structure and ornamentation?

 

The second group looks Dendroolithius to me. I’m going to vote against spheroolithidae because of the red matrix. I hate the gloss that they covered the nest in. Do you have more close ups of the shell of this nest too? A nest of this size is hard to come by these days!

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Troodon

 

7 minutes ago, HamptonsDoc said:

Wow, where did you find this first pair!?! Andy and Troodon are spot on with their assessments. The first pair looks similar to Protoceratopsid but are a little too big.  The largest of the protoceratopsid eggs are about 13-15cm in length (P2 group); these are from the Djadokhta Formation. Can you get more pictures that are close ups of the shell structure and ornamentation?

 

The second group looks Dendroolithius to me. I’m going to vote against spheroolithidae because of the red matrix. I hate the gloss that they covered the nest in. Do you have more close ups of the shell of this nest too? A nest of this size is hard to come by these days!

Dendroolithius is definitely a possibility that I stated.  Just changed to spheroolthid since that's what was reported from that formation if that's the proper locality.  Both group of eggs are from the same area.

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HamptonsDoc
2 minutes ago, Troodon said:

 

Dendroolithius is definitely a possibility that I stated.  Just changed to spheroolthid since that's what was reported from that formation if that's the proper locality.  Both group of eggs are from the same area.

Page 95 in Dino eggs and babies says spheroolithius eggs are found in white and dark grey sands, not red, which is why I voted against it but that may be referring to Mongolian localities, not Chinese. 

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Troodon
5 minutes ago, HamptonsDoc said:

Page 95 in Dino eggs and babies says spheroolithius eggs are found in white and dark grey sands, not red, which is why I voted against it but that may be referring to Mongolian localities, not Chinese. 

I had see that but believe they are describing Mongolian eggs the Chinese  chapter is later but don't see this area mentioned

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Crazyhen

I only got these few more pictures.

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A73D045E-3483-426F-B982-F13419943B91.jpeg

D10724A9-9583-41DF-9701-7EF2E05D72E6.jpeg

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Troodon

Boy these are beautiful all real.

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Crazyhen

According to the owner, these eggs were found in the West part of Guizhou, China.  Exact locality not known since he got them from villagers.

 

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Tidgy's Dad

Astonishing, these are simply breathtaking! 

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HamptonsDoc

:drool: these are some nice eggs. 

 

Just be careful if your seller is in China- it is illegal to export fossils from China and you may loose your money and never see the eggs if you chance it. 

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Crazyhen
4 minutes ago, HamptonsDoc said:

:drool: these are some nice eggs. 

 

Just be careful if your seller is in China- it is illegal to export fossils from China and you may loose your money and never see the eggs if you chance it. 

Thanks for the reminder.  Indeed it’s true.  Otherwise I would certainly get them!

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WhodamanHD

Those ichnofossils always confuse me, but I can say those are some nice eggs!

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Troodon

How is Hong Kong treated in this stiuation since it's China.  Are vertebrate fossils illegal from China into Hong Kong

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