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Troodon
22 minutes ago, Tate Museum said:

 

This is from a Barosaurus specimen we are collecting and slowly prepping from south of Casper.  It is from the Morrison Fm, late Jurassic.  This bone is a cervical rib.  It is supposed to be straight.  Yes, this is the way we found it.  How did it get this crooked.  That is your essay question.   There are others form this quarry that are even crookeder. (Is that a word?)

 

Stress forces on the rib by tendons

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Troodon

Like to thank @Tate Museum @jpc @LordTrilobite for your contributions to this week's posts they are great.  Appreciate all feedback. 

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oldtimer

I love Fridays and this Friday had such a special treat. Excellent pics and a fantastic find.

Thanks for posting and sharing with us.

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Tidgy's Dad

Yes, I concur, this thread gets better and better. 

Thanks folks. :)

So what's the story with the rib? 

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Bobby Rico
20 hours ago, Troodon said:

I will have proof that cretaceous dinosaurs are still among us, no not birds....

Can’t wait to next weeks episode of Dinosaurs fossil Friday. 

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Sagebrush Steve
On 1/12/2018 at 12:45 PM, Troodon said:

BTW next week I will have proof that cretaceous dinosaurs are still among us, no not birds....

 

Hold on, I may be retired but I’m not THAT old.

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Tate Museum

Not sure what the story on the rib is.  I don't think it is boshed and healed, for there is no healed bone in it.  Also there are others in this beast that we have not prepped yet that do almost a complete pigtail circle.  A vet I spoke to showed me an article about an autopsied penguin from a zoo that had incredibly flexible ribs due to sickness and lack of calcification in the ribs due using up her calcium to produce eggs.  Could this be a sign that this was a gravid female?  I am leaning that direction.  

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ynot

Gets better every friday!

Don't know how You do it , but thanks for the show!

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Bobby Rico
19 hours ago, Troodon said:

 

In the Late Jurassic a Stegosaurus tail spike struck an Allosaurus tail vert. Allosaurus survived.  Ouch...

Really this is an amazing Jurassic drama to be captured and displayed here.

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oldtimer

I love Fridays. You guys strive to come up with some awesome pics.  Very nice.

Thanks for posting and sharing.

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Troodon

I would like to thank @Bobby Rico @Tate Museum and @MarleysGh0st for your excellent contributions this week.   Appreciate the feedback. 

 

 Agree Bobby that must have been some amazing Jurassic drama to see that play out.   

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Tate Museum
On 1/19/2018 at 5:49 PM, MarleysGh0st said:

Since the @Tate Museum is featuring photos from the September 2016 dig at Lightning Hill, I think it's only fair to include one from the August 2016 dig at this site.  The contrast for the photo of this bone I was digging out isn't great, but the feature I want to point out is the darker brown structure sticking out to the left of the bone that tells a lot about this site.  That's the root of a living bush that was growing underneath that bone!  By the end of the day, we had jacketed the bone and were waiting for the plaster to dry before attempting to saw through the root.  The next day, when we had planned to collect it, we were chased off by some nasty, cold, wet weather and took a road trip to the Black Hills Institute, instead.  I presume the September dig group finished the collection process for this one.

20160817_162703.jpg

I know we collected it, MG.  Not sure if it has been prepped.

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MarleysGh0st

I'm particularly fond of the Lightning Hill site, since I was part of the group that discovered it was a bone bed in August 2015.  We'd been working on a nearby triceratops site, when @jpc took us to Lightning Hill for some prospecting.  He said it was a microfossil site, where we might find gar scales, perhaps some small teeth.  On the other hand, since he'd been taking groups there for several years, there might not be anything left to be found.

 

One of the group pointed and asked JP the traditional question, "Is this something?"

 

"No, that's just a rock."

 

But picking up the rock exposed the end of a bone.  Digging out the rest of the bone exposed a turtle shell.  As some of the group worked to expose that, another member started poking around at the same level, about ten feet away, and found another bone.  I lent a hand with that one, and found yet another next to it.  And so it went--our microsite had become a bone bed!

 

As described earlier, we did more work on the site in 2016, but I'm convinced we'll eventually have to shave off the entire top of that hill to uncover all there is to find there.  But last August, JP took us to another bone bed called Promise Hill. And that site's even better.

 

But that can be a teaser for this week's Dinosaur Fossil Friday!  :)

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jpc

Thanks, Marley.....

I will see if our friend Tate Museum will be posting some bones from Promise Hill this next week.  

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Tidgy's Dad

I was away this Friday, so it's nice to come back to an excellent Dinosaur Fossil Tuesday (for me). 

Thanks very much for your contributions everyone. 

I particularly loved the semi-aquatic Ankylosaurid. :)

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Troodon

Its Friday once again so enjoy and if you have something to add please do.  I appreciate all the members contributions.

 

The titanosaur Malawisaurus courtsey of the Perot Museum

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Paleontologist Jim Kirklands, Dilophosaurus wetherilli jaws UCMP 37303 from the Lower Jurassic Kayenta Formation. 

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The butt (hip) of a jurassic Dilophosaurus wetherilli

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A Tyrannosaurid from Texas's Big Bend Park

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Some Baryonyx skull goodies: snout, dentary and braincase of the holotype specimen courtsey of the NHM_London

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A saber-toothed dinosaur? This is the lower jaw of little heterodontosaurid Abrictosaurus consors  courtsey of NHM London.  It’s a plant-eater, but wow that serrated tusk

DT7jZn6U0AE4jgS.thumb.jpeg.5fb3ce7f3080be8b9ce03f8aa01601bf.jpeg

 

Diabloceratops eatoni from Cretaceous of Utah

DT71U8DU8AAr_B1.thumb.jpeg.5a1ff5516080652443ca48c1970bbb0d.jpeg

 

A tusk of the extinct walrus Ontocetus emmonsi, from the Pliocene of Florida , FLMNH US of Science

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The hadrosaur Edmontosaurus shows cranial variability through ontogeny. Here's a progression from baby (left), juvenile, and adult of the quadrate bone in the skull.

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Look closely - what can you see? It's a dinosaur footprint found in Folkestone England by Steve Friedrich - and donated to the museum. It's a rare find. Courtesy of the Folkestone Museum

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Reconstruction of Late Cretaceous abelisaur Aucasaurus, plus cast of original fossil (and bonus tail of Argentinasaurus) at the Carmen Funes Museum in Plaza Huincul, Argentina

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Troodon

How about some glyptodont tail clubs today? Here's Doedicurus (the big one) and Neosclerocalyptus (the little one) at the FieldMuseum.

DT6YAM5XUAI-B6V.thumb.jpeg.e19e7a7b2a05b0bba94d497e71b7a486.jpeg

 

The Dryosaururid Eousdryosaurus nanohallucis from the Jurassic of Portugal

DT6UyzqWAAExxHg.jpeg.176198cd7a0880dbb0e271c5397bea6a.jpeg

 

Tooth from Mid Permian conodont Hindeodus gulloides

DT6HXexVMAEFwQ1.thumb.jpeg.3470379282971fd05a55f7f9c5c9164e.jpeg

 

The spinosaurid crocodile mimic Suchomimus at the Dinosaur Discovery Museum in Kenosha, Wisconsin

DT4O52AUMAA5bQc.thumb.jpeg.5db1626d4cbbc498b4e501aa5c5344e3.jpeg

 

Teratophoneus curriei skull a from NHMU. It's part of the most complete tyrannosaur known from Utah.

DT6Nr94VAAAMG6I.jpeg.450726acc14702ee9c64dc7433def69e.jpeg

 

Mosasaurs at RBINS museum

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The fossil superstar from the Cambrian period (530 to 501 MYA). With a length between 60 and 120 cm Anomalocaris was the largest animal known from this period. The museum's specimen of A. canadensis specimen is exhibited at MNHNL -natural musée

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A cast Elasmosaur from Maastrichtian elasmosaur Zarafasaura oceanis from Morocco

Courtsey of the BHI

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Lets Look at Antarctica

An impressive late Permian (~260 Ma) fossil tree from Collinson Ridge, Antarctica (Transantarctic Mountains).

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Dicroidium leaf with Antarctic background. At Alfie's Elbow (Middle - Upper Triassic)

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Triassic fossils from the Fremouw Formation collected at Shackleton Glacier

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Troodon

Elosuchus currently housed @Le_Museum and originally from the Cretaceous of Algeria. This specimen is the only one currently known that preserves the tip of the snout!

DRqijYIV4AA1iHx.jpeg.5fd68192156c0ba8dae75bdf83f42dcf.jpeg

 

 

Kaprosuchus is an extinct genus of mahajangasuchid crocodyliform. It is known from a single nearly complete skull collected from the Upper Cretaceous Echkar Formation of Niger

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The grunt work that you normally don't see after a specimen is collected, studied and mounted for display.  Unpacking, Sorting and cataloging in this case a Medusaceratops at the ROM

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Laying Down on the Job - why why do paleontologists like to pose next to bones?

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BiggestFootprintHeader_1024.jpg

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