Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Max-fossils

Hi all,

 

So, as some of you already know, my trip to Florida is coming closer and closer :trilosurprise: I am indeed really looking forward to it!

 

Well, I have some questions about the fossils there. Firstly, for the seashells found there (bivalves and gastropods), I know that many are fossil (mainly Miocene to Pleistocene). Well, I was wondering if perhaps there were any tricks or techniques to recognize fossil ones from modern ones. For example, for the Holland coasts bivalves, the fossil ones are usually thicker, dull, white/light grey in color, and they don't let any (or very little) light shine through. Well, I was wondering if there were similar tricks for the Florida seashells to find out whether a shell is fossil or not. Please do let me know how you do it!

 

Oh, and one other quick question: are ALL the shells NOT found on the beach fossils? I know that in the Netherlands this is not the case (you can find shells several kilometers inland that are modern; they have been brought here by floods and storms), but was wondering if this was maybe different for Florida. 

 

And lastly, a quick question about the fossiling permits. Do I need to sign up for one (I will be collecting both invertebrate and vertebrate fossils, like shark teeth and dugong bones)? If yes, is one permit enough for the family, or does everyone need to apply for one individually? And how do I get them?

 

So, recap:

  1. What are tricks/techniques for recognizing fossil seashells from modern ones?
  2. Are all the inland seashells fossilized?
  3. Do I need fossil hunting permits?

 

Also, if there are any special laws that you think I should be aware of let me know too.

 

Thanks in advance for your answers!

 

Best regards,

 

Max

 

 

PS: just realized, this is actually more suitable for the Fossil Hunts thread... @Fossildude19 or another moderator, can you please move it? Thanks :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Peat Burns

Florida Fossil Collecting Permit Info

 

Here is a link with all you need to know about the permit

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
digit

Yup. Peat's got the info on the collecting permit. If you choose to go out with one of the fossil guides (and pay for the experience) they will include you under their permit. Otherwise, a good idea to have a valid permit (though I've never been asked for it by any state officials).

 

Concerning fossil shell material--

 

If you are not finding it at the shoreline on the surface, you are likely finding fossil material. It's been a while since the inland portions of Florida have been under shallow water and shells you find below the surface (or in streams or rivers) will generally be fossil material--excepting the small extant freshwater bivalves or small snails that turn up in sifting screens in the rivers (but they are obviously recent or actually living). If you are digging around on the beach you might end up finding some older shell material but it will be hard to put dates to those. I remember hearing a talk some years ago which dated shell material found from a beach (don't remember any of the details) but the findings were that the shells washing up on the shore were anywhere from recent to several thousand years old--quite a surprise. Not quite fossilized shells but definitely ancient antiques. :)

 

You picked a good year to come to South Florida as Hurricane Irma caused some epic flooding and likely eroded out a nice replenishment of fossils for this season. I just checked the Peace River gauges and we are just about at the level where the gravel bars that contain fossils are within easy reach. I may have to get out sometime in the next couple of weeks to give it a try.

 

 

Cheers.

 

-Ken

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jcbshark

If you’ll be near Venice I may be able to give you some spots to hunt. Just pm me :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
WhodamanHD

I don’t have any new info to offer, other than good luck Max!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
minnbuckeye

Max, 

 

You will fall in love with the fossils that Florida has! Obviously there is an interest from you in the gastropods and bivalves that exist in Florida. My suggestion is to look as you drive around Florida for any construction sites or road improvements. The digging itself can expose fossils. But if material is brought in from a quarry to construct a road/ driveway, it is often 90% fossil seashells. I have looked at "piles" around many parts of Florida and been very successful at bringing many nice specimens home to Minnesota. I am sure you can be as successful. The hard part is identifying all of the wonderful fossil shells that you find. Have fun.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Max-fossils
17 hours ago, Peat Burns said:

Florida Fossil Collecting Permit Info

 

Here is a link with all you need to know about the permit

Thanks, that will be useful to take a look at.

 

17 hours ago, digit said:

Yup. Peat's got the info on the collecting permit. If you choose to go out with one of the fossil guides (and pay for the experience) they will include you under their permit. Otherwise, a good idea to have a valid permit (though I've never been asked for it by any state officials).

 

Concerning fossil shell material--

 

If you are not finding it at the shoreline on the surface, you are likely finding fossil material. It's been a while since the inland portions of Florida have been under shallow water and shells you find below the surface (or in streams or rivers) will generally be fossil material--excepting the small extant freshwater bivalves or small snails that turn up in sifting screens in the rivers (but they are obviously recent or actually living). If you are digging around on the beach you might end up finding some older shell material but it will be hard to put dates to those. I remember hearing a talk some years ago which dated shell material found from a beach (don't remember any of the details) but the findings were that the shells washing up on the shore were anywhere from recent to several thousand years old--quite a surprise. Not quite fossilized shells but definitely ancient antiques. :)

 

You picked a good year to come to South Florida as Hurricane Irma caused some epic flooding and likely eroded out a nice replenishment of fossils for this season. I just checked the Peace River gauges and we are just about at the level where the gravel bars that contain fossils are within easy reach. I may have to get out sometime in the next couple of weeks to give it a try.

 

 

Cheers.

 

-Ken

Thanks a lot for all that useful info! Reading this does make me indeed even more excited :)

About the Peace Riber though - I indeed saw that Irma and the others had revealed many treasures for fossil hunters and that fossiling is great right now in Florida. But I just got a note from @Sacha saying that apparently the Peace was too high to go through and that hunting was very difficult...

 

14 hours ago, jcbshark said:

If you’ll be near Venice I may be able to give you some spots to hunt. Just pm me :)

I sure will, thanks ;) Not sure though if I'll be there, hopefully I will

 

11 hours ago, WhodamanHD said:

I don’t have any new info to offer, other than good luck Max!

Haha thanks Mason!

 

2 hours ago, minnbuckeye said:

Max, 

 

You will fall in love with the fossils that Florida has! Obviously there is an interest from you in the gastropods and bivalves that exist in Florida. My suggestion is to look as you drive around Florida for any construction sites or road improvements. The digging itself can expose fossils. But if material is brought in from a quarry to construct a road/ driveway, it is often 90% fossil seashells. I have looked at "piles" around many parts of Florida and been very successful at bringing many nice specimens home to Minnesota. I am sure you can be as successful. The hard part is identifying all of the wonderful fossil shells that you find. Have fun.

Awesome, thanks a lot for that info! Reminds me of the Netherlands: here you can also frequently find small piles of sand next to places where they are building, and as that sand is usually imported from the North Sea, it is full of nice Pleistocene fossils. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Harry Pristis

 

Be circumspect about entering construction sites in Florida.  A few years ago, it became a felony to trespass on a construction site.

 

If the Peace River is too high to work, or the weather is too cold, I have many better-than-average Peace River fossils here that are surplus to my collection.  I'm about 3 hours north of the Peace River. 

 

 

fossils_org_C.JPG

fossils_org_D.JPG

gastropods_3_vasum.JPG

gastropods_5.JPG

gastropods_6.JPG

gastropods_10.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Nimravis
51 minutes ago, Harry Pristis said:

 

Be circumspect about entering construction sites in Florida.  A few years ago, it became a felony to trespass on a construction site.

 

If the Peace River is too high to work, or the weather is too cold, I have many better-than-average Peace River fossils here that are surplus to my collection.  I'm about 3 hours north of the Peace River. 

 

 

fossils_org_C.JPG

fossils_org_D.JPG

gastropods_3_vasum.JPG

gastropods_5.JPG

gastropods_6.JPG

gastropods_10.JPG

You have some very nice fossils Harry.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
KimTexan

Yes you do and here you’re calling it surplus. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Max-fossils

@Harry Pristis ah okay, good to know. I'll watch out for that then.

 

You already sent me a message by the way with some of the fossils there. I am indeed interested, and will shoot you a message soon; thanks a lot again for the proposition! ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×