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Hexogonaria Coral??? Found in British Columbia..


tratru

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I found this whils diving in British Columbia...I have been all around this lake, and only found this type of stone in one area...still not sure what it is. However, I had seen petoskey coral un cut, and it seems to be similar??  But, further reading says it ONLY exists in Michigan.

The "pits are on both sides and are about 1/4 " to .25 of an inch deep...

PC111453.JPG

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Hexagonaria is found worldwide. 

But this doesn't look like it to me. 

more like Favosites, i would say. 

You can't see septa, and tabulate corals like Favosites have a plate over the top, which seems to fit your specimen more. 

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I don't think these are corals. The size of the "holes" are far too irregular to be corallites, they are not hexagonal, they do not appear to be tubes but rather have the appearance of bubbles, and there is no evidence of tabulae, septa, or other features that would be expected of corals.  I think these are not of biological origin, rather they are some sort of vesicular rock.  What lake did you find this in?

 

Don

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I agree with Don.

Looks like an oddly weathered limestone karst.

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they were about 20 ft down in Kootenay lake.  :)  I sure appreciate all the info. I am "stunted " when it comes to rock formations etc, but have always wondered what the heck formed these :)
 

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I'm not so sure if these rocks are vesicular (volcanic) as Don is suggesting. They look more to me like impressions from a beach conglomerate. Are there pebbles underneath the surface? Can you determine whether it's clay, limestone or something else?

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Strange...

I'm not sure, but there are sandstone outcrops here on the island(s) which have a similar sort of pitted surface from weathering by the sea. I wonder if the same kind of thing occurred along the shores of the lake, and later the rock was submerged?

I know I'll need to find a picture of what I'm talking about to convince everybody.. it's not at my fingertips.

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  • 2 weeks later...

They are bioeroded (by boring bivalves and clionaid sponges) weathered sedimentary rocks.

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