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Greg.Wood

Two more from Arkona

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Greg.Wood

Here are a couple more I picked out of the Arkona mud. I put my guesses at the bottom but would like to see what you guys think.

 

#1

These range from 5-10 mm

The shape is roughly a 3 sided pyramid with 120/30/30 degree angles

Some are pyritized but the others have a very faint lateral ridge pattern

I2.thumb.jpg.359416d3568cca3752585ec688767c10.jpgI.thumb.jpg.198e9b82d4609f8cdf55c4813f0c5ffa.jpg_16C6639.JPG.ed7bf369028281c1bf7bc51c7f6f50d2.JPG

 

#2

Y.thumb.jpg.8e1fd5a2f474c8fb9d0986756d1d7247.jpg

Y2.thumb.jpg.481e703cce214855d72aca700a007809.jpg

 

My guess:

 

#1 - Conulariid

#2 - Fragment of a Devonaster arm

 

Edit: adding one I forgot

#3

g.thumb.jpg.494fc456c0d1d5d5b3c3a6069c317340.jpg

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Fossildude19

I agree with Adam. They are hyoliths. 

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Wrangellian

Hyoliths?? @Monica, another thing to look out for at that spot next time you go!

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Ludwigia

+1 for Hyolith.

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RJB

Maybe if I could get my mind off of fossil crabs for awhile i might learn something.  never even heard of hyoliths?

 

RB

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Greg.Wood

Added another tiny one #3

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Tidgy's Dad

Is it oval in cross section?  

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Al Dente

#2 is an echinoderm, probably a starfish.

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RJB

Thank you @Fossildude19, Now I know what these are.  I know a place where there are hundreds of thousands of them.  Was a very long time ago though. 

 

RB

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Greg.Wood
9 hours ago, Tidgy's Dad said:

Is it oval in cross section?  

#3 Looks circular in cross section.

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old bones

Hyalites ! Neat little animals. I never heard of them either. Very cool finds. :)

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Wrangellian
12 hours ago, RJB said:

Maybe if I could get my mind off of fossil crabs for awhile i might learn something.  never even heard of hyoliths?

 

RB

If you were ever interested in Cambrian critters, such as Burgess Shale, you'd have heard of hyoliths! 

I was a little surprised when I learned that they survived thru the Permian...

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Monica
On 12/17/2017 at 1:58 AM, Wrangellian said:

Hyoliths?? @Monica, another thing to look out for at that spot next time you go!

 

Absolutely, Eric!!!  The NPGS's trip to Hungry Hollow is scheduled for Saturday, April 28, 2018 - I will keep my nose to the ground and do my best to find some of these myself (if I find anything interesting/different, then I'll make sure to let you know!).

 

I hope that all is well out west - it's freezing and very snow-covered over here!!!

 

Monica

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Wrangellian

Good!

It's raining cats and dogs here right now, no point in going out for any reason but I have to run errands in town..

Happy New Year in a couple days!

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Monica
13 hours ago, Wrangellian said:

Good!

It's raining cats and dogs here right now, no point in going out for any reason but I have to run errands in town..

Happy New Year in a couple days!

 

Yes, Happy New Year to you, too!!!  Hopefully 2018 will be the best fossil-hunting year yet!!!

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Kane
On 12/29/2017 at 7:15 AM, Monica said:

 

The NPGS's trip to Hungry Hollow is scheduled for Saturday, April 28, 2018 - I will keep my nose to the ground and do my best to find some of these myself (if I find anything interesting/different, then I'll make sure to let you know!).

 

 

That sounds about right for timing as it looks like we're having a serious winter this year, so the start of the season might be delayed. Heavy snows will mean higher river levels. In previous years, I could get out there at the beginning of April (still mucky) or even during the occasional January thaw. The possible silver lining may be that the prolonged and more significant melt may expose more new areas, particularly along some of the river exposures.

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crinus

For you young ones, let me tell you what Arkona will be like come spring.  When there is lots of snow and freezing temperatures, Arkona will be a sight to behold in the spring.  And I am not talking about fossils.  The first time I saw this it was incredible.  Thank God I was not at the bottom near the river.  The snow melted and the river began to flow and as the ice broke a wall of water came down the river.  It was beautiful.   You could hear it coming. The water just cleaned the banks of all mud that had piled up the previous year.  As the huge blocks of ice floated down they moved the large boulders scattered about out of the way.  Dead trees floated down as the water cleared all the debris.  I just sat up at the top of the cliff and watched for hours.  There was no fossil collecting that day.  It would take days for the river to calm down.  Once the water receded, you would have clean banks.  Then you began your search for crinoid lens along the river bank.  

 

I was fortunate to see this twice.  Timing was everything.  It use to happen every year.  The banks would be cleaned by nature.  It has not happened in many years.  Snow falls has been low and temperatures too balmy.  If this snow and temperatures continue we will have a good year for nature to clean all the build up on the river banks.  The path to the high banks will be under water for a bit but once the water recedes, it will also be cleared of a lot of debris.  All the dead and fallen trees will be swept away. Spring could be very good.

Joe

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Kane
20 minutes ago, crinus said:

For you young ones, let me tell you what Arkona will be like come spring.  When there is lots of snow and freezing temperatures, Arkona will be a sight to behold in the spring.  And I am not talking about fossils.  The first time I saw this it was incredible.  Thank God I was not at the bottom near the river.  The snow melted and the river began to flow and as the ice broke a wall of water came down the river.  It was beautiful.   You could hear it coming. The water just cleaned the banks of all mud that had piled up the previous year.  As the huge blocks of ice floated down they moved the large boulders scattered about out of the way.  Dead trees floated down as the water cleared all the debris.  I just sat up at the top of the cliff and watched for hours.  There was no fossil collecting that day.  It would take days for the river to calm down.  Once the water receded, you would have clean banks.  Then you began your search for crinoid lens along the river bank.  

 

I was fortunate to see this twice.  Timing was everything.  It use to happen every year.  The banks would be cleaned by nature.  It has not happened in many years.  Snow falls has been low and temperatures too balmy.  If this snow and temperatures continue we will have a good year for nature to clean all the build up on the river banks.  The path to the high banks will be under water for a bit but once the water recedes, it will also be cleared of a lot of debris.  All the dead and fallen trees will be swept away. Spring could be very good.

Joe

"Grampa is tellin' stories!" - :D:P 

 

It may turn out to be an excellent year there if the winter stays this way (Farmer's Almanac says no, for what it's worth). Washing out all that fallen debris would be fantastic, as would a serious reworking of the pits, which doesn't seem likely. :( I had heard a rumour that there were plans to extend or create a new pit, but that may have been wishful thinking on the part of my source. :D 

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