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Fossildude19

January 2018 - Finds of the Month Entries

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Heteromorph

P14.

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P15.

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P16.

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Done!

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David in Japan

Make me think of an Anisoceratidae but it is a little bit too young in age.

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paxhunter

Vertebrate FOTM entry

Date of discovery 1-13-2018

Pathological Hubbell Megalodon

Miocene Epoch Calvert formation approximate age 15 million years 

Calvert Cliffs Maryland

 

Found this little beauty while out on a night hunt and almost missed it. As I was cruising along headed to the higher cliffs where I do the majority of my hunting this tooth just popped out of the sand and gravel as a wave went by and luckily my light caught a flash of the enamel. The tooth measures approximately 3/4" and what makes this tooth one of my most special in my 25+ years of collecting the cliffs is not only is it a Hubbell but is also pathological the tooth has a wave in the serrations as well as a wrinkle in the enamel. Hope you guys like it as much as i do! 

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Heteromorph
13 minutes ago, David in Japan said:

Make me think of an Anisoceratidae but it is a little bit too young in age.

Wikipedia lies sometimes. That family goes well into the Coniacian and beyond. Phlycticrioceras trinodosum is an example. It goes all the way to the Campanian. My specimen could be in either the Anisoceratidae family or the Diplomoceratidae family. S. durhami is in the latter. 

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paxhunter

Vertebrate FOTM 2nd entry

Date of discovery 1-25-2018

Lower Lateral Megalodon

Miocene Epoch Calvert Formation approximately 15 million years old

Calvert Cliffs Maryland

 

 

This tooth measures just under 3 1/2" long and is in just about perfect shape it has a strange elongation to the one root and a really wide bourlette. This tooth was found half sticking out of the sand and I said the standard please be whole prayer before I picked it up and thankfully it was!!!

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Max-fossils

Some awesome finds this year! Congrats everyone! Especially love that Inoceramus @David in Japan :wub:

 

 

Last weekend, I was out in The Hague with my family to celebrate my dad's birthday. At some point, there was a small place along the road which was filled with thin tiny bushes, and the soil there was sandy (just like very often in the Netherlands; beach sand everywhere), and it contained lots of shells, many of which were fossils. I found a few common cockles (Cerastoderma edule), some balthic clams (Macoma balthica), a clam of Mactra plistoneerlandica, and also what I think is my first fossil Mactra glauca (yay!). All of these would be from the Eemian of the Pleistocene. I also found this oyster among them. At first, I thought it was simply a common oyster, Ostrea edulis, but I quickly realized that this one was quite different than that very common oyster species. I looked a bit around in my fossil books, and I think that the best match for my weird oyster would be Pycnodonte queteleti!   EDITAnomia ephippium.This extinct species of oyster is from the late Eocene, and is a rare species too!!! :ighappy:

I am not 100% sure yet that it is one, but I am pretty convinced it is. I will still check with Ronald Pouwer from Naturalis if it is indeed a Pycnodonte queteleti, or if it is something else and will let everyone know of the answer (if it does turn out to be simply an Ostrea edulis, then I think I might remove the entry, as this species is very common). 

 

EDIT: I just received an answer from Ronald Pouwer, and it seems that I was wrong in my ID. Apparently this is an Anomia ephippium , a more common species from the Eemian. Still a first for me, but definitely not as rare... So this one will likely not get any votes. 

 

So I would love to submit this entry for the Invertebrate Fossil of the Month. I have the pictures and everything, and I am perfectly ready to submit it, but OF COURSE, my devices decided that they didn't want to upload any pictures to TFF anymore :ank:  That is why I waited till the last day (today) hoping that the problem would be fixed in the meanwhile. 

So I am stuck not being able to upload any pictures, and therefore only submit half of an entry. 

 

Invertebrate Fossil of the Month

Common name: oyster

Species: Pycnodonte queteleti Anomia ephippium

Location:  ex-situ, The Hague, Netherlands

Age: late Eocene

Formation: (unknown)

Date of discovery: 27th of January 2018

 

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Max

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Max-fossils

(Just for clarification, Tim just edited my post and added pictures that I sent to him via email. Thanks Tim!)

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