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MeargleSchmeargl

Complete fossil Shark Skeletons: are there any?

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MeargleSchmeargl

fossilshark02.jpg.4b641597e048824263eb0f23e43fca4f.jpg

 

I recently found this image with a shark's jaws preserved. Makes me wonder if a shark's full cartilaginous skeleton has ever been found preserved, knowing that it is rare for cartilage to preserve at all. Has a full shark skeleton ever been found?

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smt126

There have been sharks preserved in Mazon creek nodules.

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Troodon

Glen Rocker of PaleoSearch had this 25 foot specimen of a Kansas Cretoxyrhina mantelli at the Tucson show a few years ago.  I believe it went to the McWane Science Center in Alabama.  

 

mcwane-cretoxyrhina.jpg.35e0a76a6fa40234bff97c1e35d8e38f.jpg

 

Cretaceous sharks from Lebanon are common. 

48497-7.thumb.jpg.9007695ef1d70930fe501d428966008b.jpg

 

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Spinosaurus

found this online, website says it is a orthachantus shark.

 

 

f103__28864.1505780547.900.900.jpg

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Tidgy's Dad

There are quite a few on the web, here's another one, but they are, of course, extremely rare.

Scyliorhinus_elongatus_7-1272x400.jpg

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oilshale

Several in Solnhofen, Monte Bolca and Lebanon.

Ok, mine here are very small ones, but I have seen several exceeding 1,5meters

 

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Fossildude19

One was found around 3 years ago in Calvert County, MD. 

 

LINK

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WhodamanHD

If you count xenacanthids, they have been found complete in a number of locations.

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Jeffrey P
2 hours ago, Fossildude19 said:

One was found around 3 years ago in Calvert County, MD. 

 

LINK

I saw that specimen in the storage room at the Calvert Marine Museum- disarticulated, but impressive mainly because of the rare preservation of the cartilage. The American Museum of Natural History in New York has a number of complete shark specimens in their Hall of Early Vertebrates.

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jpc

I believe it is the museum in Lincoln, Nebraska has a nice display of Paleozoic sharks from somewhere between Omaha and Lincoln.  Really cool stuff you rarely see anywhere else. 

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Cam28

Stethacanths shark (one that has a weird appendage jutting out of its dorsal surface) from the devonian has  been found complete or near complete 

 

 

1420_106_209-carboniferous-shark-spine.jpg

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WhodamanHD

Almost forgot, bear gulch has a host of complete chondrichthyians.

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doushantuo

Haimirichthys comes to mind(as a more recent discovery).Posted it a while back .and Squalicorax,BTW
Acronemus,Onychoselache,Gansuselache,Synechodus,Megachasma,Sphenacanthus.,Hybodus,Gogoselache,Ozarcus,Tristychius,Protodus from the Devonian of Forfar.,

Isurus denticulatus

Palaeobates from the Triassic of Scotland(exceptional cartilage preservation)

Nobody here has mentioned the Namurian of Scotland,I believe(Bearsden,maybe even Glencartholm)

A lot of neurocrania are found(lesser known example:Belgian Oligocene squatinids)

 

 

quggdelptttrymjjpwillist.jpg

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Ramo

I'm a little confused with that Kansas shark.  Pretty sure there is some artistic license allowed on it. I've collect a few things from the chalk, and seen a lot of stuff, but never anything that is even close to what that looks like.  There is an awesome shark in the Sternberg museum that is a big pile of big teeth, and the complete string of verts.  It is 100% real.  That Kansas shark above looks too good to be true.  Do you have any info on that?

( I just looked on their website, and I see that they have a full body  Squalicorax sp. of shark that is even more unbelievable than the Cretoxyrhina shown above. No way that thing is 100% real)

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doushantuo

quggdelpttvtrympwillist.jpg

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KansasFossilHunter
On 1/5/2018 at 10:57 PM, Ramo said:

I'm a little confused with that Kansas shark.  Pretty sure there is some artistic license allowed on it. I've collect a few things from the chalk, and seen a lot of stuff, but never anything that is even close to what that looks like.  There is an awesome shark in the Sternberg museum that is a big pile of big teeth, and the complete string of verts.  It is 100% real.  That Kansas shark above looks too good to be true.  Do you have any info on that?

( I just looked on their website, and I see that they have a full body  Squalicorax sp. of shark that is even more unbelievable than the Cretoxyrhina shown above. No way that thing is 100% real)

 

Any piece by Rockers is going to have quite a fair bit of "artistic" license to it!

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