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KraZshardLady

Cool rock or finally a fossil?

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KraZshardLady

Again, it's small enough that pics are tricky to get with my phone. I've posted the interesting side, the side, and the flip side. What do you think?20180111_034623.thumb.jpg.d83d6bacf3890f73659e4f478ff81ce5.jpg20180111_034221.thumb.jpg.281e34cff4f783f31425f0ff52eba8ab.jpg20180111_034358.thumb.jpg.0a305ce749372a2c7965b49e895184ae.jpg20180111_034944.thumb.jpg.2ae1f483ac756beeea118595ac3661d8.jpg

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MeargleSchmeargl

Location it was found in? Also, maybe some more detailed images will help.

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Fossildude19

I think this is another geological item. :unsure: 

I don't see any resemblance to any fossil. 

Regards, 

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KraZshardLady
21 minutes ago, MeargleSchmeargl said:

Location it was found in? Also, maybe some more detailed images will help.

Found in the Cambrian strip of Bucks County, PA and I'll try for better pics but I think it's probably geological as it is not in a shape of anything, now that y all mention it. It's a cool shape, just not the shape of a skeleton, creature, tooth (maybe ish), or other formerly living thing.

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MeargleSchmeargl
2 minutes ago, KraZshardLady said:

Found in the Cambrian strip of Bucks County, PA and I'll try for better pics but I think it's probably geological as it is not in a shape of anything, now that y all mention it. It's a cool shape, just not the shape of a skeleton, creature, tooth (maybe ish), or other formerly living thing.

Teeth and jaws proper didn't come until roughly 100 million years after the Cambrian period. Being from the Cambrian, that rock is probably geological, as it doesn't resemble anything from Cambrian times.

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KraZshardLady
3 minutes ago, MeargleSchmeargl said:

Teeth and jaws proper didn't come until roughly 100 million years after the Cambrian period. Being from the Cambrian, that rock is probably geological, as it doesn't resemble anything from Cambrian times.

 If I did find it outside that narrow area, it would be Jurassic or Triassic and was probably picked up along the Delaware river. 

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KraZshardLady

Here is everything I have that I think is carbonaceous, excluding the #5 group as I thought those were obsidian. The two speckled pieces in between 5&6 are unknown and I'm hoping for some insight. 

I'm starting to feel like I'd better find a fossil, lest I be banished to a rock forum!20180111_112621.thumb.jpg.9960670da45e93097f64e96de0ac9b24.jpg20180111_112411.thumb.jpg.d65be3a1106ea4db6d8a84b7a18167b4.jpg20180111_112507.thumb.jpg.3eefe2468a599271e7f765ba2c0eda31.jpg20180111_112244.thumb.jpg.7f7456278f3877c7b2f709dc02c04a3d.jpg20180111_112324.thumb.jpg.bdf6677d8a2ea5bbc221c0cd02ddf86c.jpg

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abyssunder

Don't know if it helps, but in a closer look on this map beside the Cambrian limb there is an Ordovician area.

Bucks.jpg.b642657c6e0b745e727267a94c985123.jpg

 

Centerfold.thumb.jpg.34621c3b33426b62261d79867a6a26fc.jpg

 

Also, related to the presumed Obsidian, I think this would be helpfull: Obsidian in Pennsylvania

Edited by abyssunder

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KraZshardLady
1 hour ago, abyssunder said:

Don't know if it helps, but in a closer look on this map beside the Cambrian limb there is an Ordovician area.

Bucks.jpg.b642657c6e0b745e727267a94c985123.jpg

 

Centerfold.thumb.jpg.34621c3b33426b62261d79867a6a26fc.jpg

 

Also, related to the presumed Obsidian, I think this would be helpfull: Obsidian in Pennsylvania

Here is everything I have that I think is carbonaceous, excluding the #5 group as I thought those were obsidian. The two speckled pieces in between 5&6 are unknown and I'm hoping for some insight. 

I'm starting to feel like I'd better find a fossil, lest I be banished to a rock forum!20180111_112621.thumb.jpg.9960670da45e93097f64e96de0ac9b24.jpg20180111_112411.thumb.jpg.d65be3a1106ea4db6d8a84b7a18167b4.jpg20180111_112507.thumb.jpg.3eefe2468a599271e7f765ba2c0eda31.jpg20180111_112244.thumb.jpg.7f7456278f3877c7b2f709dc02c04a3d.jpg20180111_112324.thumb.jpg.bdf6677d8a2ea5bbc221c0cd02ddf86c.jpg

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KraZshardLady

Anthracite coal, #5 is anthracite. 

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ynot

From @abyssunder's link,

"The state of Pennsylvania is not known for volcanism. In fact, the last volcanic event in the area was approximately 201 million years ago and was associated with flood basalts of the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province -- from the first breakup of the supercontinent of Pangaea. This rifting stopped and the Gettysburg-Newark Basin was formed as a result. No obsidian from these eruptions has been found."

There is no obsidian older than the cretaceous, because hydration will decompose obsidian rather quickly (geologically speaking.).

 

The pieces shown are actually slag from smelting (Someone gave it a fancy name to help sell it). Also from that link....

", in the Pittsburgh region, steel smelting produced large amounts of anthropogenic obsidian, such as pictured above. The steel making process involves heating a mixture of iron ore, limestone and coke (distilled bituminous coal) to temperatures beyond what is needed for the natural formation of obsidian. The impurities in the melt rise to the top and are decanted off and cooled, resulting in slag. I was born and raised in the Pittsburgh area and remember watching molten slag being dumped down the banks of the Ohio River on a regular basis. The molten slag looked like lava as it flowed down the banks and lit the sky up for miles with its orange glow. The specimens pictured above were collected in the town of Baden, where due to decades of steel production, the slag is being mined for use as aggregate."

 

 

@KraZshardLady,

Obsidian is hard (like glass) and no streak.

Most corbon related minerals are low hardness and have a dark brown to black streak.

It should be easy to scratch with a nail.

 

I think most of the pieces You showed in the last picture are either coal, slag or metamorphic rocks.

The "obsidian" could be black chert or (but more likely) slag.

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Roberta NJ CA

Re: "Forum Banishment"

 

I felt the same way after posting some concretions... Oh the shame! But was quickly reassured by so many forum members that we're here to learn and enjoy the process without judgement... and with this encouragement I'm ready to start posting again!   Don't give up, cause you never know what you'll find,...

 

Roberta

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ynot

Yeah, We all started with no knowledge and had to learn somewhere.

Wish I had a resource like The Fossil Forum when I was learning the basics, but I still learn a lot being on this site (almost every day!).

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KraZshardLady

Aaaaw, yous guys rock!

 

 

Teehee 

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