Jump to content
khrm

economic importance

Recommended Posts

khrm

Hello everybody.. am new here .. As i am student of vertebrate paleontology.

I need help to find answer ... How paleontology support economically to a country ? as this question was asked in interview .. i think could not satisfy them.. 

I've read that paleontology helps to find gold and petrol etc .. but i dont know what is the real procedure .. and how to answer them to get this scholarship ?

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ludwigia

I would say that palaeontology is in the business of generating knowledge rather than economic income. However, geology contributes considerably to the gross national product through the exploration for natural resources.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kane

As Luwdigia says, certain aspects of geology are more indexed on revenue-generation, particularly those working in the private sector. Locating natural resources can be done by geologists. 

 

That being said, some aspects of palaeontology have provided small economic benefits for those who seek to commodify either fossils or their collecting, potentially adding more to local economies. The revenue generation for such activities, such as dig-sites, etc., would be quite modest. The role of a palaeontologist in such ventures would, I presume, be more on a consultation side if not also providing some research benefit in those areas where new specimens are found. Similar might be said about museums that rely, in part, on admissions, grants, volunteers, and subsidies to continue their work. 

 

There would not really be any significant opportunity for the field of palaeontology to provide a national economic benefit. Although perhaps one could point to the booming fossil trade coming out of Morocco, that is distinctly trade arising from the collecting, preparation (or, sadly, outright fabrication) of fossils - not their official study.

 

Perhaps at best one could say that it contributes to overall cultural and intellectual capital, both of which may have an indirect relationship to an economy. However, it would not distinguish palaeontology from other forms of cultural and intellectual capital that may also provide ambient benefits, such as art history, music, philosophy, etc.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
WhodamanHD

Things learned form the creatures and climate of the past have applications in tech and engineering as well as sustainability today. If a country were to use the designs provided by Mother Nature and heed the climatic patterns of days past (and then create technologies to combat this) then those technologies could become economically beneficial.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
FossilDAWG

Paleontology (especially the study of microfossils such as foraminiferans and conodonts) is a crucial element of stratigraphy, and stratigraphy is an essential component of understanding the geology of any area to identify potential sites for mineral or oil production.  As a simple example, oil may be found where the rock layers are folded into an anticline (an upward arch) if there is a layer of impervious rock over layers of porous or permeable rock, as the oil will move upwards under pressure until it is trapped in the anticline.  Of course the rocks are all buried in the ground, so geologists have to try to map the structure of the rocks without being able to look directly at them.  One way to do this is to drill a lot of cores and compare the layers in the cores from one place to another to build up a picture of the overall structure.  Often the layers are not really obvious in a core so fossils may be the best way to distinguish them.

 

A different example would be the Pierre Shale in the USA.  This is a very thick Cretaceous shale formation (100's of meters) in which the stratigraphy is hard to distinguish based on lithology as the shale looks pretty much the same top to bottom.  The stratigraphy was finally worked out, mostly by a paleontologist named Bill Cobban, using ammonites, as around 20 ammonite zones characterized by different species (mostly of Baculites) are present in the formation.

 

Don

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
-Andy-

Tourism.

 

Dinosaur fossils are always a crowd-pleaser. It's the reason why top museums always have impressive fossils.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Yvie

Unfortunately you need to preserve not destroy some of the finds for a future generations and generating an income.With particular reference to the foot tracks found in Baroch Nala Malakhel,Mianwali that have been destroyed by local miners.Managed properly that area could generate local income which spreads out and develops with further finds.Local education is important.The trails and museums that can be developed can lead to an area like Montana USA and put it on the map for visitors.

 

Good Luck

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jpc

Tourism, yes.  Museums bring in a small group of tourists to any area.  Whether they are arty, history or geology museums, they add to the tourism economy.  And if they come for a museum, they are likely to also go to a restaurant for lunch or dinner, and maybe spend the night in a hotel.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Troodon

The commercial side of paleontology has an economic impact on cities around the world.  Tidgy's Dad pointed out how big it is in Morocco.  Here in Arizona, for three weeks, visitors from around the world come to participate in the Tucson Gem, Fossil and Mineral Show.   Every corner of the city is filled with commerce that brings millions of dollars in to the local community.  Shows in Denver, Munich and Sainte-Marie-aux-Mines, etc also contribute to the local economy and help foster people interest in Natural History.  

Let's not forget the commercial side of online auction sites that everyone in the world participates in.   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
oldtimer

@Troodon.  Very well explained with good examples of the economic benefit and impact. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ashcraft

Vertebrate paleontology in the US helps bring income to Phd's by allowing them to publish and thereby garner more grant money.

 

But I am a bit of a pessimist,

Brent Ashcraft

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
FossilDAWG
On 1/18/2018 at 12:31 PM, ashcraft said:

Vertebrate paleontology in the US helps bring income to Phd's by allowing them to publish and thereby garner more grant money.

 

But I am a bit of a pessimist,

Brent Ashcraft

Perhaps you could use one of these.

 

Don

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ashcraft
1 hour ago, FossilDAWG said:

Perhaps you could use one of these.

 

Don

They would probably send me the wrong mug.

 

Brent Ashcraft

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
FossilDAWG

:hearty-laugh:

Don

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×