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BananaNemesis

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BananaNemesis

We found this a few years ago at a beach in PBC Florida... I think there had been a renourishment and they had brought sand up from off shore. We don’t know what it is.. do you?

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EC39A388-6BA7-4961-AA0E-709BC5D87763.jpeg

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Shellseeker

Amazing!! I have never seen anything like it.  You already have me thinking "ivory" or tusk and I love those.  Can not help here...just watch and see if someone IDs it. :popcorn:

Welcome to TFF. It is a large community of great people with common interests.

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Shellseeker
33 minutes ago, Al Dente said:

Gorgonian holdfast, or in other words it is the part of a sea fan or sea whip that attaches to the sea floor.

Great ID... Found this link and photo

http://woostergeologists.scotblogs.wooster.edu/tag/italy/

5a5a1a1ab25cb_Gorgonianholdfast2.JPG.9ad026778b3bf39382bf376eb815c219.JPG

 

Learn something new...

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WhodamanHD

Another vote for gorgonian holdfast. I remember this in another thread a while back.

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Al Dente
35 minutes ago, digit said:

Though this base looks like it came from the same animal I believe it is actually part of the limestone structure of the reef created by other reef building corals and/or coralline algae.

Ken - My understanding is that some species have calcified bases but the rest of the animal lacks carbonate structure. We find the bases frequently in the Eocene limestones of North Carolina and they usually have the concentric growth rings.

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digit

Nice! I like to learn new things and flesh out the corners of my understanding. As I mentioned, I usually see these when they are alive and my experience with dead (or fossilized) gorgonians is near nil.

 

I also know my Tropical Western Atlantic fish species very well but I can have a hard time identifying a parrotfish, snapper, grunt or grouper in a fish market because all of the coloration clues that I'm used to in a live fish have usually disappeared and are replaced with new "fish market" coloration patterns.

 

Cheers.

 

-Ken

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Tidgy's Dad

I love this. :wub:

Never seen a fossil gorgonian before, live ones yes, fossils, no. 

This forum is really increasing my understanding of this amazing planet. 

Thanks for posting BananaNemesis! 

Great find and welcome to the forum! 

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BananaNemesis

Thanks so much guys!!!! You guys have given me some awesome information!!

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abyssunder

It's a very nice find. :) Congrats!

No doubt, the specimen in question is an octocoral holdfast.

Compared to the one from J. S. Jell et al. 2011. Australian Cretaceous Cnidaria and Porifera. Alcheringa, 35: 241-284 , clearly has a good resemblance, although the are from different geological time and location.

 

5C2D2A21-3904-4C3A-A2BF-556E250EECCE.jpeg.78d916b9b03468bc2929d054c3ddc82a.thumb.jpeg.fbed17c07ab47edeeb9e1002bac70f4c.jpeg2011AlcheringaCretcorals.thumb.jpg.904c48e557bf8f89d51b8ad0409d3e2e.jpg

 

(Every time when I see something that confusingly looks like an antler, it reminds me of a gorgonian. :))

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