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Hollow Reptile Egg Fossil

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Mousehead

Hey guys!

 

I'm curious about this egg fossil I've got here – it's been preserved with its hollow shell intact and sort of crystalized.  I know there are loads of these eggs out there, but I've never seen one like this before so I'm wondering how unusual it really is.  The other egg seems to be solid when held under a bright light.  Here's what I know about it:

 

– Ophidienovum sp

– From a snake, I think

– Tertiary/Miocene

– From Mainz, Germany

– Eggs are 2cm long

 

Would love to hear your input!

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Edited by Mousehead

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Kane

Welcome to the forum. :) 

 

Certainly an interesting item, but I have my doubts this is a fossil egg as opposed to a calcite(?)-filled nodule. Our fossil "eggs-perts" should be along shortly to give you a much more definitive opinion! 

 

I'm hoping it is an egg, but I usually see them with more crackled texture.

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digit

I too get the geological rather than biological feel from this one. We are blessed with having some good "eggs-ports" as Kane mentioned so I await their input on this.

 

Where did you get this item? Was if something you found or purchased?

 

 

Cheers.

 

-Ken

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Mousehead

Hey thanks!  You people are fast.  This was something I purchased.  If it helps, for scale, the eggs are about 2cm long.

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Foozil

If you look here you can see some other specimens of Ophidienovum eggs, they look pretty similar imo. What are the fossils in the matrix, gastropods?

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Troodon

Fits the size of Ophidienovum (snake) eggs,could be hatched.  Lots of them are sold.

 

example of one

Egg2asnake.jpg.jpg.e4496a2a7b000195d9556a59d19e2123.jpg

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cheney416

Really interesting one...

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digit

I'll start off by saying that I have no experience whatsoever with fossilized eggs though, as you'll see, this won't keep me from adding in my two cents. :P

 

Many turtle, lizard and snake eggs that I've come across are not hardened with calcium carbonate but tend to be rather thin leathery/plasticy membrane shells. I wonder if the filled egg once buried and on its way to becoming a fossil may completely decompose away leaving a biologically produced "vug" for lack of a better term which may then be filled with a calcite material (either as a hollow form or a solid)?

 

Again, completely theoretical on my part coming from a complete lack of experience with these fossils but guessing at the taphonomy that might produce such a representation of these little eggs.

 

 

Cheers.

 

-Ken

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ynot

These look remarkably similar to agate nodules, even the smaller "snails" in the matrix pieces.

I can not see a reptile egg retaining this shape as a fossil, because as Digit said, they are soft shelled eggs.

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Troodon

Tried to find some scientific evidence to support these eggs

 

Mitt-Bad-Landesver-Natkde-Natschutz-Freiburg_NF_13_0127-0134.pdf

Screenshot_2018-01-22-20-58-36.thumb.jpg.cd4617c1d6040926c3fd3fa330274acb.jpg

 

A Paleoportal, unfortunately cannot find the English version with this view

 

https://www.ammonit.ru/foto/39797.htm

 

141564012588565-med.jpg.f58c002c2981884fb1d71579c0c21c1e.jpg

 

 

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doushantuo

ophidian eggs:finely striated,heteropolar(elongate)

bird eggs have a slight resemblance to dinosaur eggs

Cote: from the side

Dessus:from above

turtle egg:oval,smooth

eclos: hatched

lithology: lacustrine marls,micritic carbonates,the greenish ones with mammal remains & bone debris,white marls with charophytes

and ostracods

Bouxwiller is actually a pretty famous locality,much  lik eg.Issel.

The Cenozoic geology of the Upper Rhine graben is pretty well known .

BTW:

(yes,I know it says "dinosaur",but the scheme might apply to most amniotes(if not all))

 

 

douvcalcitlptttrymjjpwillist.jpg

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HamptonsDoc

Could be snake eggs but I don’t know much about them. If they are then the crystallization is pretty cool!

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RJB

I certainly dont know, but I sure do like digit's idea. 

 

RB

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