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HamptonsDoc

Incredibly high quality Dino eggs

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Tidgy's Dad

Lovely eggs and mothers! 

Though Troodon, of course, is no longer a valid genus, it would seem. 

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caldigger

Curious, why is Saltasaurus so popular? Looks like an old cantaloupe.

I think some of those other ones look pretty nifty.

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HamptonsDoc

Correct- the Troodon nest now has a different label to it.  Most people think these are from protoceratops but I’m not sure if that’s been confirmed. I’m blanking on the oogenius and species name which is the true way to label dino eggs. 

 

The best saltasaurus eggs are perfectly spherical and 7” in diameter and very well preserved. Being from Argentina they’re are extremely rare to find on the market now. I think it’s the shape and difficulty in obtaining them that makes them so special. The cost is also pretty prohibitive when they do show up. Most dino eggs, even other sauropod eggs, won’t roll around on a table if they’re not on a stand like Saltasaurus and Titanosaur from South America. 

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oldtimer

Those egg examples are awesome.  Wonder what the prices were back then?

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-Andy-

Beautiful eggs! I don't own even a single egg of this quality.

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Tidgy's Dad
7 hours ago, oldtimer said:

Those egg examples are awesome.  Wonder what the prices were back then?

Even back then you'd have to shell out quite a lot for these! :D

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Troodon

Thanks for posting very cool, nice memories.   For those that attended the Tucson show in the early 2000's my best memories included seeing room after room of Chinese dealers selling skeletons or eggs.   There was a dealer that sold only beautifully prepped  eggs, no missing shell, many different types, nests, oh to have him back today would have made you drool big time.   I've kept my early show guides and need to go through a few of them to see if they advertised.  Will post the adds if they did.

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HamptonsDoc
10 hours ago, oldtimer said:

Wonder what the prices were back then?

If this violates TFF policy mods please delete this post!

 

 

I don’t know what they actually sold for but here are the pre-auction estimates listed in the catelogues:

 

Egg with Embryo 1: not listed

Egg with Embryo 2: not listed

Large nest with mother: $40,000-$50,000

Smaller nest with mother: $45,000-$50,000

”Troodon” nest: $40,000-$50,000

Saltasaurus egg: $4000-$5000

Raptor nest: $8500-$10,000

Hadrosaur nest: $7500-$10,000

 

All very expensive. The only one that seems to be a good price compared to today is the Saltasaurus egg which can go for 2-3x that.

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Troodon
17 hours ago, caldigger said:

Curious, why is Saltasaurus so popular? Looks like an old cantaloupe.

I think some of those other ones look pretty nifty.

What's wrong with cantaloupes?  Yum yum...

A Saltasaurus egg is the crown jewel, the holy grail of any collection.  Very rare, cool locality and just very different than other types.  Also one of the most expensive as a single egg that is only obtainable from old collections.

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Troodon

No adds in those old brochures but did see a few auction catalogs from 1998 with some of the pictures you posted.  Unbelievable eggs couple more not as nice.

 

5a6e2e5a3f1eb_20180128_130056(1).thumb.jpg.432addbe4ff417e609754e109695cfff.jpg

 

20180128_125950.thumb.jpg.2e207a672b7e60e8ff9fb6360ce92c73.jpg

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Foozil

Oh wow. Those aren't too bad! I have no room but I'm sure I could make some for these pieces :D 

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SailingAlongToo

Sounds like even if @HamptonsDoc and/or @Troodon gave us the "friends and family" discount, these would still be cost prohibitive. :blink:

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RJB

  Not sure how I missed this post.  Nice eggs for sure!!!

 

RB

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HamptonsDoc

This is an embryo of Beibeilong sinensis, "baby dragon from china" from the late cretaceous from Henan Province in China.  Collected in 1993, the embryo was named Baby Louie and was featured on the cover of National Geographic Magazine.  Egg type is Macroelongatoolithus xixiaensis, around 18 inches long.  The full nest was 10 feet in diameter.

 

IMG_9602.thumb.JPG.58d9e10ff1ee47b5383107c0655f41b6.JPG

image_4848_2e-Beibeilong-sinensis.jpg

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HamptonsDoc
On 1/28/2018 at 3:11 PM, Troodon said:

20180128_125950.thumb.jpg.2e207a672b7e60e8ff9fb6360ce92c73.jpg

@Troodon Just looking back at these pictures... do you know if that is an American egg?  Based off the grey matrix I'd guess it is unless its a black and white photo!! :rofl:

 

I've never seen an American egg as inflated as that one if it is from the US, although it is missing a significant amount of shell...

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