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oldtimer

I have a sand dollar that is mostly covered by pyrite.  It still has most of it's luster. I have read about pyrite disease and am wondering what I should do to help preserve it.

I have also read that having pyrite in the fossil showcases my affect other fossils.  Is this true?

What should I do to bring back some of the luster?  And how would be a good way to seal it to prevent the turning or ruining of the fossil and others? 

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oldtimer

Can the fossil be coated with something like a polyurethane or other clear coating to not have to use oil monthly?

I live in Oklahoma where the humidity is ridiculously high in the summer so I am concerned big time.

 

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Ludwigia
3 hours ago, oldtimer said:

Can the fossil be coated with something like a polyurethane or other clear coating to not have to use oil monthly?

I live in Oklahoma where the humidity is ridiculously high in the summer so I am concerned big time.

 

Yes. I coat the fossils liberally with a cellulose lacquer which we call zapon lack. It's best to bake them beforehand for a few minutes in the oven in order to remove any moisture. One can then repeat the procedure every few years just to be sure. This method prolongues their survival for quite a few years, but nevertheless, depending on the stability of the pyrite/marcasite, some of them will start to bloom at some point, whereas others can remain intact for decades or even longer.

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Herb

an acrylic based satin nail polish hardener will work in small specimens

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oldtimer

I am not sure what an acrylic nail polish hardener is. 

Are there other products that can work?

I would like to preserve this fossil but also prevent damage to others in my cabinet..

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ynot
1 hour ago, oldtimer said:

I am not sure what an acrylic nail polish hardener is. 

Are there other products that can work?

I would like to preserve this fossil but also prevent damage to others in my cabinet..

There are some good threads on this subject in the fossil preparation sub forum here on TFF.

 

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Ludwigia

Just go to the hardware store for the zapon lacquer or the drug store for nail polish hardener. Neither of them will disturb your other fossils.

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hrguy54

Before coating it with anything, clean it with Comet to bring back whatever luster you can.  Toothbrush, Comet, water.

Dry well after.  I do this often to my pyrite.

Then coat with whatever you decide once it is dry. But you'll do so with the shiniest you can get.

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Asher Cordova

How common are Iron pyrite/Quartz veins in very fine shale deposits?

 

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Kane
20 minutes ago, Asher Cordova said:

How common are Iron pyrite/Quartz veins in very fine shale deposits?

 

Depends on the depositional and preservation environment. I've worked in shales where pyrite tracks from burrows was quite common, and the replacement mineral for trilobite shells and nautiloids was more or less pyritized in full; and I've worked in shales where there is no visible trace of pyrite. I've also gone through largely non-fossiliferous or poorly fossiliferous shales of the Marcellus that had an abundance of pyrite staining along with large pyrite nodules. 

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doushantuo

Pyrite is nor UNcommon in black shales,indicating the former presence of hydrogendisulphide.

A sign of intermittent or absent oxygenation(anoxia).

Actually D(egree)O(f) Pyritization is a common proxy for D(egree) O(f) O(xygentaion)

Particulary if the pyrite is framboidal(boisenberry-like shape)

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Malone

Is this an example of framboidal?

IMG_2935.JPG

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ynot
1 hour ago, Malone said:

Is this an example of framboidal?

Framboidal is a microscopic feature and We would need pictures under high magnification to be able to say it is or is not.

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Malone
5 minutes ago, ynot said:

Framboidal is a microscopic feature and We would need pictures under high magnification to be able to say it is or is not.

I have been looking into a microscope that attaches to my phone. it's amazing the things that are being made! Thank for your response!

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Malone

I believe this partial steinkern has framboidal pyrite, but I don't have a microscope for my camera.

IMG_3096.JPG

IMG_3109.JPG

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oldtimer
On ‎2‎/‎8‎/‎2018 at 1:13 PM, hrguy54 said:

Before coating it with anything, clean it with Comet to bring back whatever luster you can.  Toothbrush, Comet, water.

Dry well after.  I do this often to my pyrite.

Then coat with whatever you decide once it is dry. But you'll do so with the shiniest you can get.

 

Does comet bring back the shine?  Will water not affect the Pyrite or  fossil in a bad way?

I presume for sure it is going to have to be extra dry before coating.

Is iron out a better choice to bring out the gold color and shine over comet?

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ynot
4 minutes ago, oldtimer said:

Is iron out a better choice

Iron out is an acid that will get into the micro fractures in the pyrite and eat it from the inside (unless it is neutralized after application.). 

I would not use it on a pyrite specimen.

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Malone
On 2/23/2018 at 6:49 AM, ynot said:

Iron out is an acid that will get into the micro fractures in the pyrite and eat it from the inside (unless it is neutralized after application.). 

I would not use it on a pyrite specimen.

Is oxalic acid suitable to clean pyrite?

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caldigger

Oxalic acid is basically the same as Iron Out. Unless you want to destroy your specimen, I would not recommend.

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ynot

I would not us any acid on pyrite. I would use a toothbrush and comet or bon ami to clean.

But that is just Me.

If You do use acid, make sure to neutralize it after the acid treatment.

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Malone
1 hour ago, ynot said:

I would not us any acid on pyrite. I would use a toothbrush and comet or bon ami to clean.

But that is just Me.

If You do use acid, make sure to neutralize it after the acid treatment.

The reason I asked is because I have comet like stuff that is called bar keepers friend and is supposed to be stainless steel cleaner that I got for cleaning rock samples. Is backing soda a good neutralizer?

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ynot
39 minutes ago, Malone said:

Is backing soda a good neutralizer?

Yes, when dissolved in water.

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Malone
7 minutes ago, ynot said:

Yes, when dissolved in water.

Thank you!

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