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@RSJC, I would definitely recommend visiting the Mineral Museum at New Mexico Tech.

 

I have not spent much time in the Socorro area but I do know if some Permian outcrops near Bingham and some Upper Cretaceous outcrops near San Antonio.

 

Enjoy your stay and good luck.

(hit me up through PM and I will try to get you some better locality information)

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@PFOOLEY  Thanks,  If my flight is on time hope to get to hunt around ABQ.  Read that east off of I40 has some good places at Rio Puerco and Mesa Lucero.  Do you know anything about those spots? 

 

Edited by RSJC
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@PFOOLEY.  Actually, the museum at NM Tech got me interested in fossils.  Was there in Sept for training and visited it.  Going back thete for morre training.  I am vert new to it and have lots to learn, so I appreciate the help.

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3 hours ago, RSJC said:

...Mesa Lucero...

I have never hunted this area but have seen it mentioned in literature.

3 hours ago, RSJC said:

...Rio Puerco...

This is my second home...just much further North, on the Eastern edge of the valley.

 

 

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I just drove through there yesterday.  I tried to read the "Roadside Geology of NM" from my vantage point behind the wheel, but I advise against this type of activity.  

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@jpc,  why do you advise against hunting there?  Haven' t confirmed yet but my understanding its BLM land. Does it just not look like a good area?   Thanks

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I'm pretty sure he was advising against reading guidebooks while driving.  

I collected in the Rio Puerco once under the guidance of Pfooley.  It was a highlight of my collecting career.  Hopefully some of the locals will be able to give you some advice.

 

Don

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Yeah, I was advising against reading and driving.  I would love to hunt there, but I was just trying to ID the rock units in New Mexico.  They are different enough from ours.

I was actually thinking Triassic....

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There's some Devonian (Sly Gap Formation) in the Mud Springs Mountains right beside Socorro (I looked for it but didn't find it a couple of years ago), and tons of Pennsylvanian limestone all laid out like a layer cake.  There are silicified brachiopods, corals, and sponges in places.  East of town there is some Cretaceous with ammonites and bivalves.  You will also not be far from Elephant Butte, where a T. rex mandible was found several years ago, and more recently a gomphothere skull (not in the same formation obviously).  If you are taking a geology-related class, I'm sure some of the local faculty/students can put you on to some decent sites.

 

Don

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17 hours ago, FossilDAWG said:

There's some Devonian (Sly Gap Formation) in the Mud Springs Mountains right beside Socorro (I looked for it but didn't find it a couple of years ago), and tons of Pennsylvanian limestone all laid out like a layer cake.  There are silicified brachiopods, corals, and sponges in places.  East of town there is some Cretaceous with ammonites and bivalves.  You will also not be far from Elephant Butte, where a T. rex mandible was found several years ago, and more recently a gomphothere skull (not in the same formation obviously).  If you are taking a geology-related class, I'm sure some of the local faculty/students can put you on to some decent sites.

 

Don

Those finely layered beds west of Socorro were the inspiration for me to read the book while driving.  They looked potentially fossiliferous and I wanted to know what age.  But the book let me down.  It is all mapped as volcanics.  And some of it is obviously not.  

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This recent bulletin has a bunch of papers with info on the fossils from Socorro County.

DiMichele et al. is excellent 76 pages and should be very useful for finding plant fossils.

 

Lucas, S.G., DiMichele, W.A., & Krainer, K. eds. (2017)

Carboniferous-Permian transition in Socorro County, New Mexico. 

New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science Bulletin, 77:1-352

 

 

DiMichele, W.A., & Lucas, S.G. (2017)

The first specimen of Annularia spinulosa Sternberg from the Lower Permian Abo Formation, New Mexico, and implications for rarity in the plant fossil record.

New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science Bulletin, 77:17-23   PDF LINK

 

DiMichele, W.A., Chaney, D.S., Lucas, S.G., Nelson, W.J., Elrick, S.D., Falcon-Lang, H.J., & Kerp, H. (2017)

Middle and Late Pennsylvanian fossil floras from Socorro County, New Mexico, USA.

New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science Bulletin, 77:25-99   PDF LINK

 

Hodnett, J.P.M., & Lucas, S.G. (2017)

Paleoichthyological assemblages of the Upper Carboniferous-Lower Permian of Socorro County, New Mexico.

New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science Bulletin, 77:133-138   PDF LINK

 

Lerner, A.J., & Lucas, S.G. (2017)

The pseudofossil Astropolithon from the Lower Permian Abo Formation of Socorro County, Central New Mexico.

New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science Bulletin, 77:225-230   PDF LINK

 

Voigt, S., &  Lucas, S.G. (2017)

Early Permian tetrapod footprints from central New Mexico.

New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science Bulletin, 77:333-352   PDF LINK

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Herrick, C.L. (1904)

A Coal-Measure Forest near Socorro, New Mexico

The Journal of Geology, Vol. 12, No. 3 (Apr. - May, 1904), pp. 237-251  PDF LINK

 

Lucas, S.G., DiMichele, W.A., & Krainer, K., Chaney, C., & Spielmann, J. (2009)

A Coal-Measure Forest near Socorro, New Mexico

New Mexico Geological Society Guidebook 60, Geology of the Chupadera Mesa Region, 2009, p. 235-242  PDF LINK

 

 

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On 2/5/2018 at 1:06 PM, jpc said:

I just drove through there yesterday.  I tried to read the "Roadside Geology of NM" from my vantage point behind the wheel, but I advise against this type of activity.  

I have just one word for you, " books on tape"  or if you've advanced beyond the '80's books on disc.

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  • 1 month later...

Yeah, the fossilizing hot-spots out here are few and far in-between,,,Mr. Pfooley only makes it look easy...

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