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Peat Burns

A Trip to the Devonian of Iowa

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Peat Burns

Thanks to @minnbuckeye who gave me a site suggestion to an Iowa Devonian locality when I was on my way to the White River Formation of Nebraska, I was able to satisfy my palaeozoic fix this past June.  Here are my finds (scale in photos is cm/mm):

 

Orthospirifer cf. O. cooperi

Resized_20180215_003146.thumb.jpeg.6e6e4f6c1dec8cd58ba425e7e8e1d320.jpeg

 

Strophodonta sp.

Resized_20180215_002834.thumb.jpeg.0cd29d426604e5c0355977be55b96145.jpeg

 

Cranaena sp.

Resized_20180215_002602.thumb.jpeg.3a120dd44065105dd91a89afa89c508f.jpeg

 

 

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Foozil

Nice finds! I love that Cranaena!

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Peat Burns

Close-up of Cranaena showing characteristic pores of Terebratulida

Resized_20180214_221415.thumb.jpeg.9eb80d5b59b57c12da3311ca1d422dc8.jpeg

 

I haven't spent time on this large brachiopod yet.  Maybe a Schizophoria?

Resized_20180215_002741.thumb.jpeg.9112a7c049c7b6190f87e8e1934e1ce4.jpeg

 

Hexagonaria sp.

Resized_20180215_002813.thumb.jpeg.4705c8fdd00f27777749c6e86ce35d82.jpeg

 

Unidentified Rugosa.  Still struggling to ID these.  Might be Aulacophyllum or Tortophyllum.  Gonna try the acetate peel next...

Resized_20180215_002926.thumb.jpeg.d75f1b4d94b8e50443bfa4ea9b55fd4f.jpeg

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Peat Burns
2 minutes ago, Foozil said:

Nice finds! I love that Cranaena!

Thanks :).  

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Tidgy's Dad

Nice finds. :)

Those horn corals are very interesting. 

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Peat Burns
Just now, Tidgy's Dad said:

Nice finds. :)

Those horn corals are very interesting. 

Thanks TD. I love horn corals.  I think it's childhood nostalgia.  They were common in the glacial deposits where I lived.  Same goes for brachiopods.  Love 'em.:)

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Peat Burns

cf. Tylorthis  sp.

Resized_20180215_003247.thumb.jpeg.e2a72c934c2da0b7c7d25f4b63a1c2c6.jpeg

 

Other finds not pictured: Atrypa sp. and Gypidula sp.

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Ludwigia

Nice finds! And thanks for the closeup of that brachiopod. I wasn't aware of that.

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Manticocerasman

Nice finds, I realy like the hexagonaria. I see them a lot arround here to.

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Monica

A very pretty set of brachiopods and other inverts - well done! :dinothumb:

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minnbuckeye
6 hours ago, Peat Burns said:

Terrabratulida2017 - Brachiopod Aficionado

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  • Peat Burns
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Close-up of Cranaena showing characteristic pores of Terrabratulida

Resized_20180214_221415.thumb.jpeg.9eb80d5b59b57c12da3311ca1d422dc8.jpeg

 

 

 Terebratulids typically have biconvex shells that are usually ovoid to circular in outline. They can be either smooth or have radial ribbing. The lophophore support is loop shaped in contrast to the spiralia of similar looking spiriferids. Terebratulids are also distinguished by a very short hinge line, and the shell is punctate in microstructure. There is a circular pedicle opening, or foramen, located in the beak.

 

Learn something every day! Nice specimens for your short stop! But where are your Nebraska finds????

 

 Mike

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Peat Burns
9 hours ago, Ludwigia said:

Nice finds! And thanks for the closeup of that brachiopod. I wasn't aware of that.

 

Thanks Ludwigia.  Isn't that cool?!

8 hours ago, Manticocerasman said:

Nice finds, I realy like the hexagonaria. I see them a lot arround here to.

Thanks!

 

7 hours ago, Monica said:

A very pretty set of brachiopods and other inverts - well done! :dinothumb:

 

Thanks, Monica!

5 hours ago, minnbuckeye said:

 

 

 Terebratulids typically have biconvex shells that are usually ovoid to circular in outline. They can be either smooth or have radial ribbing. The lophophore support is loop shaped in contrast to the spiralia of similar looking spiriferids. Terebratulids are also distinguished by a very short hinge line, and the shell is punctate in microstructure. There is a circular pedicle opening, or foramen, located in the beak.

 

Learn something every day! Nice specimens for your short stop! But where are your Nebraska finds????

 

 Mike

Hi Mike.  I'm still holding out on the entire trip report while I prep and reconstruct a partial oreodont skeleton, coming soon to the prep subforum!

 

However, here is the big Stylemys tortoise I recovered :):megdance:

 

 

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Nimravis

Nice finds- congrats.

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Peat Burns
Just now, Nimravis said:

Nice finds- congrats.

Thanks, Ralph:)

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minnbuckeye

Great post on the tortoise recovery and prep!

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ynot

Nice finds.

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