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indominus rex

Real Grallator footprint?

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indominus rex

I found this on the internet claiming to be a Grallator footprint. But it looks too perfect, could this be a authentic dinosaur footprint?

image.jpeg

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Manticocerasman

I concur with Troodon, it is a real footprint, I got simmilar ones from France.

 

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Tidgy's Dad

Maybe they've just wetted it to 'emphasize' the print? 

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Seguidora-de-Isis

Oh yeah! The deal here is 100% real!

 

image.thumb.png.971438ea6ce68786525e4b968d6afbeb.png

 

But this "liquid" is too scattered around the real contours, so I also believe it to be water. The great advice here is to question the seller what kind of "liquid" this is.

 

And yes, it's a legitimate dinosaur footprint, but "Grallator" taking this footprint to a particular dinosaur species, in my opinion is fairy tale. I would rate it as being a footprint of an indeterminate theropod.

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HamptonsDoc

Seems almost harder to find one of these that doesn't have paint on it to illustrate the footprint...

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RyanDye
9 hours ago, caldigger said:

I am not a fan of the coloring/ shadowing of tracks or any fossil for that matter to show what it "should" look like.

I see this a lot with many of those reptile and fish fossils. 

In fact that would be the first thing I would want to do upon receiving one is to remove the coloring.

Au natural, that's more like it!

Maybe we should start a naked fossil campaign. :trilo:

Liva le fossile d'naked! :crab:

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Troodon
26 minutes ago, Nimravis said:

This has been going on for a long time. Here is a print of mine that was found in 1941 by Indiana Paleontologist Jesse James Galloway. It is a great 3D print, and like @snolly50 , I think it would not have been necessary with such a great print. But because the nomenclature on the piece and everything else, I have left it alone as a piece of history.

 

 

 

I kind of like what they did with your specimen.  It's subtle and enhances the print.  It also helps others not familiar with impressions see it.

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WhodamanHD

My earth science teacher managed to find a dino print in Frederick county MD,

no idea where, and he outlined in with a sharpy to show students.

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JohnBrewer

If I was lucky enough to have a footprint I would coat just the print with weak Paraloid or similar which would just enhance it a little. It’s also reversable and can be removed with acetone which is important. (Too me anyhoo) :) 

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HamptonsDoc
23 hours ago, Troodon said:

tracktype2.thumb.jpg.3ff3f0ee1451caca3807065e5b3d3dcc.jpg

 

I really like this chart- thank you!  Just wish it had a size scale.  Saved for future reference!

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Troodon
12 minutes ago, HamptonsDoc said:

 

I really like this chart- thank you!  Just wish it had a size scale.  Saved for future reference!

Scale is 50 cm but has nothing to do with the actual footprint since each type has multiple types of dinosaurs that are different in size.  What's important is just the shape.

 

http://paleo.cc/paluxy/ovrdino.htm

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Seguidora-de-Isis
On 21/02/2018 at 8:58 PM, Troodon said:

A couple of points, first identification of footprints is a lot like Dinosaur eggs where they are described to a ootaxon and not a specific species.   Footprints are also not identified to species but to a type see attached chart.

tracktype2.thumb.jpg.3ff3f0ee1451caca3807065e5b3d3dcc.jpg

 

Second in my opinion the enhancements do in some areas extend beyond the toe pads but not to the extreme you show.  I think we need we owe it to the seller to represents it fairly.

 

In fact unfortunately there is a language barrier here my great friend @Troodon. Perhaps the fault is Google Translate? Or maybe it's my fault that I do not speak English? :rofl:

 

But I hope, please, my friend try to understand me now. In fact I know that footprints, scientifically are not identified to species but yes to types.

 

But the problem is with the laity. For example, I visited a government museum here in my country, and I saw a footprint discovered in the United States. And it was written on the bronze plaque: Dinosaur Species: Grallator Sp. :o

 

When a friend, completely layman comes to visit my private collection here at home, he would expect to see:

 

A block of mud (still moist) inside a cardboard box with a huge dinosaur footprint in the center...

 

He would expect to see:

 

Huge bones of phosphate and calcium, just like modern bones...

 

image.png.42bb8ae085b9cb2bcca240776788515b.png

 

I do not know how big it is a culture/intellectuality can be in your country, but here in my country the lay population in paleontology / archeology can reach an incredible 85% in every my country ... So, it becomes difficult for me to explain to my friend that in the past was mud or sand containing the footprint, and which later solidified and turned into rock, imagine then try to explain the formation of the positive with the negative in the same footprint.... :(

 

 

It's complicated to explain how such a big bone has turned into rock...

 

I see my friend's eyes on me with enormous mistrust ... And I can almost hear his thoughts: "What a lie! You took the whole year to sculpt it all"!

 

So to try to explain this a bit better to the visitors that appear here, the footprints here in my private collection I write so on the board:

 

Footprint of Theropod (Carnivorous Dinosaur).
Species: Not determined.
Type: Grallator.

 

And I also believe that everyone's Museums should make this clear to their visitors ...

Huge hug!

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