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Chomper

Bone identification please

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Chomper

I found this over the summer at stratford hall in VA. Can anyone help me identify this? Thank you!

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indominus rex

Could it be a sponge or a coral? I will leave this one to the experts.

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Fossildude19

Gastropods are what I am seeing as well. :) 

 

 

 

1web.jpg.f78e668fbd200809586a3a3c86a20cde.jpg

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Kane

I'm in agreement with the others. I also see a kind of Hormotoma sp like gastropod imprint there. Good quality images, by the way! :) 

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Chomper

I licked it and my tongue stuck. The lick test says bone. I'm off to mouthwash. 

 

lick test.jpg

Edited by Chomper
adding image

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ynot
7 minutes ago, Chomper said:

I licked it and my tongue stuck. The lick test says bone.

Sorry, but this is not a reliable test. Many rocks will also stick, depends on the porosity of the rock.

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Chomper

Definitely can agree that it could be an imprint.

28236488_10155369334472444_1618468888_n.jpg

28449580_10155369317787444_1515833975_n.jpg

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Rockwood

Encrusting fenestrate bryozoan Photo 7, just above inches.

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Rockwood
42 minutes ago, Rockwood said:

Encrusting fenestrate bryozoan Photo 7, just above inches.

That would make it a long distance roller though. 

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Chomper
1 hour ago, Kane said:

I'm in agreement with the others. I also see a kind of Hormotoma sp like gastropod imprint there. Good quality images, by the way! :) 

Thanks!

 

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abyssunder
53 minutes ago, Rockwood said:

Encrusting fenestrate bryozoan Photo 7, just above inches.

correct

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Rockwood
3 minutes ago, abyssunder said:

correct

Paddle wheel shape is right. 

I bet you have a roller. ;)

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Chomper
44 minutes ago, Rockwood said:

Paddle wheel shape is right. 

I bet you have a roller. ;)

Thanks!

 

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Rockwood

Just to fill anyone not familiar with the situation in a bit.

The spot is in an area where deposits are of Neogene age and Fenestrates went extinct in the early Triassic I think.

It almost had to have rolled in the current of the Potomac River from some upstream source.   

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GeschWhat

It sticks, really? Chert does not stick. It is possible that it is a coprolite. It could have come to rest on the sea floor (hence the gastropod imprints), and those boring clams do seem to like the calcium phosphate.

 

@Carl

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abyssunder
3 hours ago, Rockwood said:

Just to fill anyone not familiar with the situation in a bit.

The spot is in an area where deposits are of Neogene age and Fenestrates went extinct in the early Triassic I think.

It almost had to have rolled in the current of the Potomac River from some upstream source.   

Was the glacier transported material ruled out?

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Rockwood
5 hours ago, abyssunder said:

Was the glacier transported material ruled out?

I've heard of glacial deposits a bit north of  Washington, D.C., but Virginia ? I sort of doubt.

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Al Dente

I don’t think it was a fenestrate bryozoan. Probably an encrusting bryozoan on a gastropod that left an impression.

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Rockwood
59 minutes ago, Al Dente said:

I don’t think it was a fenestrate bryozoan. Probably an encrusting bryozoan on a gastropod that left an impression.

Agreed. 

I think the scale being in 1/8 inch when we're used to millimeters fooled us.

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Carl
12 hours ago, GeschWhat said:

It sticks, really? Chert does not stick. It is possible that it is a coprolite. It could have come to rest on the sea floor (hence the gastropod imprints), and those boring clams do seem to like the calcium phosphate.

 

@Carl

I suppose it could be a coprolite but the stick-test is not absolute - just highly suggestive. It could just as easily be a weathered pebble with invertebrate molds and/or burrows.

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Chomper
14 hours ago, GeschWhat said:

It sticks, really? Chert does not stick. It is possible that it is a coprolite. It could have come to rest on the sea floor (hence the gastropod imprints), and those boring clams do seem to like the calcium phosphate.

 

@Carl

I think my tongue touched this about nine time, please tell me its not a turd.  

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GeschWhat

 

38 minutes ago, Chomper said:

I think my tongue touched this about nine time, please tell me its not a turd.  

 :rofl: Like Carl said, the lick test is not definitive. Not all coprolite/bone sticks. Of course I don't usually go around licking random rocks - just those I think might be coprolite or bone.  So I haven't actually encountered a rock that sticks that has not been one of the two. Here is a recent beauty I picked up at the Tucson Gem Show. It was found in South Carolina. It does not have any cool impressions, but it is riddled with clam borings. The only reason I know for sure mine is a coprolite is the button-like sphincter mark on the end. And yes, it does have good stickage as well. As you can see yours is similar. I am an optimist, so I would label yours as a "possible" coprolite.

Sphicter-small.jpg

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Chomper
1 hour ago, GeschWhat said:

 

 :rofl: Like Carl said, the lick test is not definitive. Not all coprolite/bone sticks. Of course I don't usually go around licking random rocks - just those I think might be coprolite or bone.  So I haven't actually encountered a rock that sticks that has not been one of the two. Here is a recent beauty I picked up at the Tucson Gem Show. It was found in South Carolina. It does not have any cool impressions, but it is riddled with clam borings. The only reason I know for sure mine is a coprolite is the button-like sphincter mark on the end. And yes, it does have good stickage as well. As you can see yours is similar. I am an optimist, so I would label yours as a "possible" coprolite.

Sphicter-small.jpg

Aw man, I think coprolite might be the answer. Lesson learned, do not lick. 

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