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HoppeHunting

Brownie's Beach 02/18/18

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HoppeHunting

I can confidently say that Brownie's Beach is my favorite site so far. I have only been to a handful of collecting locations, but I can already tell that this park is a gem. There are so many things to love about this site, from gorgeous scenery to great accessibility. I hadn't been hunting for about a month, and when you're new to this type of addictive hobby, that much time can begin to feel like withdrawal. So I can't tell you how excited I was to finally get back out there.

 

As a side note, I'll try to keep my trip reports a little more brief. I've noticed that I'm practically writing an essay each time I post one of these. 

 

Anyway, once I saw that the forecast wasn't nasty, like it had been on the weekends for so long, I seized the opportunity and made my way out to the Cliffs once again. I got there very early, just before sunrise. I began collecting after snapping a few shots of the stunning scene over the bay, of course. The tides were not ideal, as it was just after high tide when I arrived, so I had quite a bit of trouble even making it past certain points. I may get some waders at some point, but I love my boots. With the high tides, I found myself transformed into a parkour master at times throughout the day. For the first few hours, I really wasn't finding too much. I was a bit discouraged because I had expected a couple decent finds for being the early bird. Turns out another TFF member had beat me to it. We crossed paths not too long after sunrise and shared the few finds we had so far. I forget his username, but I think his name was Phil. Later, we met again and showed out best finds so far; mine being a beautiful upper Hemi, and his being one of the biggest and most pristine Isurus teeth I've ever seen. It truly must've been nearly 3 inches in slant height. Apparently he had found it where I had already walked. Not to self: slow down the pace a bit. 

 

Later in the day, I began spotting some much better finds than earlier. The beach got busy near the entrance, but the Cliff base remained relatively calm. I ran into a good deal of other collectors, including another forum member, named Rob I believe, who was happy to show his finds and pictures of previous hauls. He's found loads of chubs at Brownie's, which gives me hope. I continued collecting along the Cliffs and near the entrance a bit, but the tide never really went out very far before it began to come back in. Because of this, I found myself hugging the cliffs along some stretches. This proved dangerous in multiple ways, one of which I learned the hard way. Twice. Walking right at the base of the Cliffs means you'll sometimes be stepping on extremely slippery, wet, clay-like material. Doing this, I fell two times. The first time, I feel on my bottom. But the second time, I stuck my hand out instinctively to break my fall. You know how there's a layer of broken shells protruding from the cliffs? Yeah, my hand went straight into that. If anything were to ever bite me at the Cliffs, I would think it'd be the sharks, not the shells! Another danger, and something I think we all should take very serious, was the cliffs falling. There were at least two places where there was a large tree hanging on for dear life on an overhang, directly over the beach. You could see the roots of the trees because the cliff under it had eroded and fallen. Very unstable and highly dangerous. The fallen logs along the beach are proof that the can and will fall. Point is, BE CAREFUL ALONG THE BASE OF THE CLIFFS, and keep your distance if you have the choice.

 

I wrapped up the trip a bit early this time around, because the tide was high again and my body was aching from jumping from cliff fall mounds and rocks all day. Honestly, aside from the physical strain, this may have been my best trip yet. At least in terms of finds. It was definitely an enjoyable outing.

 

My finds including a lot of the usual. Of the couple hundred teeth I found, the majority were small Lemons and Requiems. However, I also got many things that are a first for me. A couple large upper Hemis made me jump with joy because as you know they're my favorite. I found a cool broken Cosmopolitodus (Giant White) tooth, and a couple Cows, one that is actually pretty much complete! I found a lot of shark verts, which isn't typical, and my first fragments of dolphin verts too. I also managed my first ever crocodile tooth, which I am ecstatic with! Also got some Threshers and Hammerheads, as well as two complete Angel Shark teeth! Other than that, some decent ray plates and tigers round up my haul for the day. 

 

Thanks for reading. I tried to keep it short, but sometimes my enthusiasm just takes over and I want to share every little detail. As always, Hoppe hunting!

 

(p.s. If either of the forum members I met read this, drop a reply so I can see your account names!)

 

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HoppeHunting

WARNING: Slightly graphic.

 

Here are a few other pictures from the trip. I found the lobster (if that’s what he is) crawling along in the surf. He was about as long as my hand. Always fun to have an encounter with the local wildlife. The other pictures are showing my minor injury. You can see the shells layer that stabbed me, as well as my puncture wounds. Who said fossil hunting isn’t dangerous?

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HoppeHunting

The Hop 5:

 

1. Hemipristis serra: This is the biggest tooth I’ve ever found, and I’m in love with it. The slender shape and sleek jet black coloration makes this a killer snaggle. About 1.5 inch slant height.

 

2. Carcharias cuspidata: Of the Miocene Sand Tigers I’ve found, this is the biggest and prettiest. It may very well be my favorites colors on a tooth so far. Beautiful pink and orange crown.

 

3. Notorynchus primigenius: A complete Cow Shark tooth? Yes please! These are not only rare, but they look beyond awesome. A little damaged, but a great tooth.

 

4. Hemipristis serra: An upper Hemi in near perfect condition with a light gray crown and tan root. My first good find of the day, and most iconic looking Hemi yet.


5. Thecachampsa sp.: My first ever croc tooth! I wasn’t exactly sure if that’s what it was at first, but I’m pretty certain now. Super cool find. Small, but in great condition.

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Darktooth

Congratulations on a good hunt! Glad that you didnt get hurt any worse than you did. There are hazards at the cliffs, that's for sure. Nice finds!

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Tidgy's Dad

Really enjoyed reading your essay!;)

A nice trip, good finds and sorry about your injury. :)

Love the croc tooth! Congrats! 

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Littlefoot

Waving a big hello to you, and I really enjoyed reading your recap! I actually hit Brownie's the day after you (Monday, the 19th), and looking at your haul, I'm amazed I found anything! You got some great finds!

 

I agree with you that the cliffs look terrifying, and there were places were I just kept eyeing them, waiting for something to fall and squish me flat! I know exactly the trees you're talking about that were hanging over the cliff, and I moved past them as quick as my little feet could take me! There were a few places where I found myself sticking in the mud and my boots coming off. I slipped a few times myself. I'm sorry to see you cut yourself! Ye-ouch!

 

I do love Brownie's Beach as well, as I find the most variety there of all the beaches I've hit. 

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Calvert Cliff Dweller

That is a Crayfish not a Lobster. This is Blue Crab country down here in CC.

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WhodamanHD
1 hour ago, HoppeFossilHunting said:

Notorynchus primigenius: A complete Cow Shark tooth? Yes please! These are not only rare, but they look beyond awesome. A little damaged, but a great tooth.

Notorynchus cepedianus I’ve been told is the main cow shark at Brownies (other than hexanchus which I think. Very nice finds, how much time did you spend there? 

@Littlefoot I was there on Monday as well, about what time? You may have seen the fifteen year old in waders waddling quickly through the water to back to the parking lot (I was short on time, must’ve been a funny sight). I’ll get my haul posted later this week. 

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jcbshark

Awesome finds and pics! That’s a big ol crawdad:)

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Fossildude19

Cool report and great pictures and finds. 
Thanks for posting.  :) 

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Littlefoot

@WhodamanHD -- I was there from about 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., sloooowly walking the entire cliff at sloth speed. I bet you were there and gone before I even arrived! Need to get out earlier, but alas, I've got young'uns to get situated before I head out, and Brownie's is one beach I don't feel comfortable taking them to.

 

No judgement at all about waddling in waders! I think everyone waddles in those things, myself included! Looking forward to seeing your finds, and perhaps I'll post mine as well! The "possible poop" was found on that trip.

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HoppeHunting
33 minutes ago, Calvert Cliff Dweller said:

That is a Crayfish not a Lobster. This is Blue Crab country down here in CC.

Ah, thanks. That's a big one then, isn't it? It was about half a foot long.

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HoppeHunting
30 minutes ago, WhodamanHD said:

Notorynchus cepedianus I’ve been told is the main cow shark at Brownies (other than hexanchus which I think. Very nice finds, how much time did you spend there? 

@Littlefoot I was there on Monday as well, about what time? You may have seen the fifteen year old in waders waddling quickly through the water to back to the parking lot (I was short on time, must’ve been a funny sight). I’ll get my haul posted later this week. 

I believe N. primigenius and N. cepedianus are synonymous. Studies determined that the prehistoric species is identical and not an entirely separate species. Knowing this, I simply prefer to use the previous species name as I think it's better to distinguish from the extant shark.

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HoppeHunting
42 minutes ago, Littlefoot said:

There were a few places where I found myself sticking in the mud and my boots coming off. I slipped a few times myself. I'm sorry to see you cut yourself! Ye-ouch!

 

I do love Brownie's Beach as well, as I find the most variety there of all the beaches I've hit. 

Yeah, there were some mounds of falls that were like quicksand! I almost lost my boots a few times as well. Gotta be careful, or next thing you know you'll end up being another hunter's next find! I agree that the variety at Brownie's is a major pull factor. Sites like Purse are great for quantity, but you can't find the hundreds of unique species that you can in the Calvert area. 

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WhodamanHD
18 minutes ago, HoppeFossilHunting said:

I believe N. primigenius and N. cepedianus are synonymous. Studies determined that the prehistoric species is identical and not an entirely separate species. Knowing this, I simply prefer to use the previous species name as I think it's better to distinguish from the extant shark.

Okay, just saying what I’ve heard:D

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WhodamanHD

@Littlefoot I was there from 1:20 about to about to 2:10, I had time to check comb reasonably well up to the end and then get my waddle one quickly back. Water and sediment at Brownies is, umm, let’s just say “brackish” in more ways than salinity. I don’t understand those who swim in it

(I hope you cleaned that cut well @HoppeFossilHunting ) and of course the cliffs are unstable.

I wouldn’t take kids out there either. Do post your finds, we have a duty to make every one else jealous:D

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DevonianDigger

Very nice finds!!!

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HoppeHunting
8 minutes ago, WhodamanHD said:

Water and sediment at Brownies is, umm, let’s just say “brackish” in more ways than salinity. I don’t understand those who swim in it

(I hope you cleaned that cut well @HoppeFossilHunting )

Yeah, I cleaned it out but I'm afraid it looks like it's going to scar; those shells sliced pretty deep. I was breaking a fall, so a lot of my body weight went to that one hand. I'm just lucky it wasn't smack in the middle of my palm! But what do you mean about the water at Brownie's? From what I've seen when I'm there, it's very clear. Is the water quality really that bad? Please don't tell me there's something pumping out toxic waste nearby. Is THAT what that pipe is?

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WhodamanHD
8 minutes ago, HoppeFossilHunting said:

But what do you mean about the water at Brownie's? From what I've seen when I'm there, it's very clear. Is the water quality really that bad? Please don't tell me there's something pumping out toxic waste nearby. Is THAT what that pipe is?

No toxic wast that I know of (the Power Plant is actually pretty clean from what I’ve heard) but with all the trash and rotting plant debris in the warm clay, not quite a clean set of water. Here’s a screen shot from the Brownies beach website (well Chesapeake beaches website about brownies beach) 

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Calvert Cliff Dweller

The water quality is pretty good in the cold weather months and as the water warms up in May ,June the bacteria levels rise a little. Just don't drink the water. LOL

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ynot

Nice finds.

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cowsharks

I think the tooth you are referring to as a croc tooth is actually the crown to a dolphin tooth.  How big is it? 

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WhodamanHD
On 2/22/2018 at 9:36 PM, Calvert Cliff Dweller said:

Just don't drink the water.

Now you tell me:P

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HoppeHunting
9 minutes ago, cowsharks said:

I think the tooth you are referring to as a croc tooth is actually the crown to a dolphin tooth.  How big is it? 

I'm quite certain it is a small Thecachampsa sp. tooth. It's about half an inch long, hollow, and has a cutting edge. I've done side-to-side comparisons with online examples of croc teeth from the same formation, and read up about the genus in an official publication. It does look a bit like the crown of an Odontocete tooth, but I can say with some confidence that this belonged to a croc.

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Kimi64

Great finds & a great story. The part that I can't get over is the crayfish. Even the worst of the Maryland invasive crayfish species don't usually get past 4.5-5 inches in length, so if it really was the length of your hand?? Anything else you can share arout finding that critter?

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