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DevonianDigger

Official Penn Dixie Field Guide!

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Tidgy's Dad

Congratulations! :yay-smiley-1:

You should be justly proud. 

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WhodamanHD

Very nice, good job to you and your colleagues  :dinothumb:

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Al Tahan

@DevonianDigger

 

hey jay,

 

I gave the guide a read...really nice!!! Awesome guide and well put together.

 

Im curious about something regarding the tichenor limestone that was mentioned. It said something about the tichenor limestone being folded by some unknown geologic process?

 

coming from a background dominated in structural geology this peaked my interest. 

 

Can you possibly shed light on what the paper is trying to insinuate? Does the tichenor fold while the rest of the windom doesn’t? It was a somewhat vague mention of the topic.

 

If this is true I should really go and take detailed measurements of the bedrock strata and see if there is a bigger picture to be seen. I had no idea something like a fold was present at penn Dixie 

 

Al

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Al Tahan

First paragraph last sentence. This interests me a lot. “Rises and plunges within Penn Dixie, illustrates the folding of rocks by some yet unknown process”

 

if we know the orientations of the folding it may give a big clue. Near Buffalo Along the squajacwada (bad spelling) highway the limestones rise and fall a small amount making a wavy looking affect. It’s very isolated. One of my professors thought it was sediment draping....another thought it was slight folding was related to the tectonic processes that tilted the bedrock across the state millions of years ago. 

 

However, there is no data that I’m aware of to make a proper interpretation. That’s where this is very interesting. 

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DevonianDigger

Sorry for the slow response, Al. 

 

So, our thinking is that it was tectonic. Some, i.e., Gordon Baird argue that it is due to sediment loading.

 

We are able to determine that the layer has not been overturned. What we have a series of anticline syncline folds present in the Tichenor. Near the trilobite pit, we have a syncline, this pairs with the anticline that is visible along the drainage creek. There are several other sections of the site that demonstrate similar pairings. We suspect that this is typical throughout the region, but there just isn't enough data yet to really present any official findings and we have not yet uncovered enough of the site to study the features further.

 

That's about all of the info I can give about the subject I'm afraid :/

 

Oh, and I botched one of the trilobite IDs in that paper. (Go me!!!) The Greenops species in the Windom is the G. barberi. My first contribution to the scientific literature and I blow it, lol.

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