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Cloud the Dinosaur King

Mesozoic Fossils in South Carolina

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Cloud the Dinosaur King

Does anyone know where I could find some Mesozoic fossils in South Carolina? I want to find some ammonites for my collection, as the closest thing in my collection that I have is a goniatite. I also want to find some dinosaur or marine reptile teeth. Does anyone know where I could find some?

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Fossildude19

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LINK

 

You're probably out of luck on dinosaur or marine reptile teeth. 

Most of the Upper Cretaceous formations have plants or invertebrates. One listing in the link provided mentions ammonites, but remember, much like a fossil, ...this information is ANCIENT, and in most instances, no longer accurate. 

 

Finding treasures such as these in South Carolina is going to be a difficult task, probably taking years, (or decades!) to come across one item on your list.  

Best way to find stuff is do your research, get out, and go looking. 

 

"To the motivated go the spoils!" - Uncle Siphuncle. 

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Troodon

Like Tim as said pretty difficult task in SC but some dinosaur material has been found.  Here is the Charleston museum collection and the images are a link to more info including general locality.

 

http://www.charlestonmuseum.org/research/collection/?group_by=object_id&sub_category=Paleontology&collection=Vertebrate+Paleontology+Collection&category=Natural+History&object_name=Dinosaurs

 

 

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Fruitbat

You might find links to some articles of interest in my pdf library here on The Fossil Forum. (LINK)  Just scroll down to the section for South Carolina.

 

In addition, you might find the following article applicable:

 

Soehner, J.R. (2012). Why Is There Such A High Concentration of Vertebrate Remains Within A Bone-Bed Along Clapp Creek, Williamsburg County, South Carolina? Masters Thesis - Wright State University.

 

-Joe

 

 

 

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reddesilets

The only Mesozoic layers in SC are more upstate. You won't find anything at all from that time in the Lowcountry. IDK about Mesozoic vertebrates though... We were once the part of Pangea that split up so a lot of Mesozoic material is volcanic and metamorphic probably with some ocean stuff on top of that. I know inverts have been found in the upstate, but that's all I know about.

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Plax

unless you consider Myrtle Beach low country. I have seen Sphenodiscus and Mosasaur material from the Peedee there. Lots of Peedee formation exposures there and along the larger rivers in the vicinity.

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reddesilets

Myrtle Beach is lowcountry. I'm not overly familiar with that area (I'm in Charleston) but as far as I know (and after looking at USGS surficial map of the area) I don't see anything pre-Cenozoic; however, I certainly wouldn't dismiss a claim such as yours since you have been there and I have not. Generally speaking, the Lowcountry doesn't have Cretaceous bearing layers close enough to the surface for exposure though some may be washed into the Lowcountry by erosion from further inland. But again, if you've seen it, perhaps you have better insight into that area. I would certainly love to be wrong about it and let my son know we could see something closer to home! LOL :ighappy:

 

I may dig into the older reports by USGS to see what they say about Peedee Fm and any exposures in the coastal plains. Thx for the info!

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Plax

The Cretaceous Peedee Formation is named for exposures along many miles of the Peedee River. The ICW in the Myrtle Beach area has exposures of the Peedee as well as some dredge spoils. You can search this forum for the many cretaceous fossils found at Myrtle Beach and environs. There is also a lot of literature on the subject. Believe me when I say it's not my experience, but in the record. I rarely go fossil collecting. There's a good book on South Carolina Dinosaurs that is available. You can google it to get the name which I can't recall at the moment.

  No Cretaceous near Charleston though of course so for your area your comment is correct. You and your son can do a little googling and search this site for places to find Cretaceous Fossils in SC. they are abundant in places but not for dinosaur fossils of course. Most of the dino material I've seen is from the Florence area.

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Boesse

At CCNHM we've got a rather large collection of latest Cretaceous vertebrates from Myrtle Beach including sharks, pycnodont fish, mosasaurs, and even a handful of dinosaur elements - all from the Peedee and mostly collected in the 1980s and 1990s by the late Rita McDaniel.

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sixgill pete

@reddesilets certainly with a BS in geology from CoC in Charleston you would know about the mesozoic in S.C. as @Plax stated the PeeDee formation was named for the exposures along a good 20 mile stretch of the river. Not to mention all the exposures along the intercoastal waterway. There are cretaceous exposures all along the coast and inland 20 or so miles from Brunswick County North Carolina to just north of Georgetown South Carolina. 

 

Besides the book @Plax mentioned there is at least one paper I know of about the dinosaurs in South Carolina. 

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reddesilets
On 8/31/2018 at 10:28 AM, Boesse said:

At CCNHM we've got a rather large collection of latest Cretaceous vertebrates from Myrtle Beach including sharks, pycnodont fish, mosasaurs, and even a handful of dinosaur elements - all from the Peedee and mostly collected in the 1980s and 1990s by the late Rita McDaniel.

 

I did not realize that about Myrtle Beach. I look more closely at museum pieces next time and take note of where they were found. Thanks! :)

 

1 hour ago, sixgill pete said:

@reddesilets certainly with a BS in geology from CoC in Charleston you would know about the mesozoic in S.C. as @Plax stated the PeeDee formation was named for the exposures along a good 20 mile stretch of the river. Not to mention all the exposures along the intercoastal waterway. There are cretaceous exposures all along the coast and inland 20 or so miles from Brunswick County North Carolina to just north of Georgetown South Carolina. 

 

Besides the book @Plax mentioned there is at least one paper I know of about the dinosaurs in South Carolina. 

 

No actually having a geology degree from CofC doesn't mean I know about mesozoic layers of SC. I know more about the Colorado Plateau than I do SC. I did do undergrad research on the stratigraphy of the Charleston Peninsula but that's about it. CofC doesn't focus on SC.  Because there isn't much in here in Charleston to study we have to go where better study areas are. I did my field studies in NM, UT, and AZ.

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sixgill pete
3 hours ago, reddesilets said:

 

I did not realize that about Myrtle Beach. I look more closely at museum pieces next time and take note of where they were found. Thanks! :)

 

 

No actually having a geology degree from CofC doesn't mean I know about mesozoic layers of SC. I know more about the Colorado Plateau than I do SC. I did do undergrad research on the stratigraphy of the Charleston Peninsula but that's about it. CofC doesn't focus on SC.  Because there isn't much in here in Charleston to study we have to go where better study areas are. I did my field studies in NM, UT, and AZ.

Please understand I mean no disrespect towards you in this, but I just find it very interesting that the basic geology of S.C. is not something that would be learned at a S.C. institution. Especially about formation named after places, rivers or other things in the state.  Hopefully this new knowledge will allow you to experience more of what your state has to offer fossil wise. 

 

 

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sixgill pete

Here is a link t a publication from 1936 that includes the then known Cretaceous exposures of South Carolina. https://pubs.usgs.gov/bul/0867/report.pdf

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reddesilets
1 hour ago, sixgill pete said:

Please understand I mean no disrespect towards you in this, but I just find it very interesting that the basic geology of S.C. is not something that would be learned at a S.C. institution. Especially about formation named after places, rivers or other things in the state.  Hopefully this new knowledge will allow you to experience more of what your state has to offer fossil wise. 

 

 

 

It may be a SC institution but geology students come here from all over and leave here to go other places. It doesn't teach to narrowly focus on any one area, but is more broad to allow a better understand of geology in just about any given place on the planet. Really great program and I'm interviewing for several jobs right now ranging from hydrology to positions that fall under engineering geology. With my background at CofC, I could interview anywhere I wanted since I wasn't focused only on the SC Lowcountry.

 

Thanks for the resources. I wanted to dig up some stuff but haven't had the time yet so that helps a lot. :) My other son is doing virtual school so I've been busy with him.

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