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RJB

What kind of tooth is this!!!

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RJB

  Alright all you smarty pants, (and thats a good thing), i got this about 20 years ago with a batch of other teeth from south america. I have no idea as to what kind of tooth this is.  Any help is greatly apppreciated.  Thanks a ton. 

 

RB

DSCN1435.JPG

DSCN1436.JPG

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caldigger

Looks like cetacean. 

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JohnBrewer

One for my box Ronny ;) 

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ynot

I think it is a miocene whale tooth.

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RJB
30 minutes ago, caldigger said:

Looks like cetacean.

 

28 minutes ago, ynot said:

I think it is a miocene whale tooth.

 

  Ok guys, i alreay knew that but im looking for a more exact Genus and species kind of thing. 

 

RB

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ynot

    Family Kogiidae

But that is just a guess.

Maybe @Boesse can answer this one.

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ynot
27 minutes ago, Troodon said:

I see Boesse already did a nice write up on it.

(Nice of Him to use a picture of My tooth to lead the article.)

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RJB

Thank you Troodon, Im now guessing that I have an Odontocete tooth? 

 

RB

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Shellseeker
5 hours ago, RJB said:

  Alright all you smarty pants, (and thats a good thing), i got this about 20 years ago with a batch of other teeth from south america. I have no idea as to what kind of tooth this is.  Any help is greatly apppreciated.  Thanks a ton. 

 

RB

DSCN1435.JPG

 

Wow Ron,

You certainly have treasures in that old attic.  This one belongs in the light of day,  with a descriptive label for the next 20 years... Thanks for sharing...

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Macrophyseter
6 hours ago, RJB said:

i got this about 20 years ago with a batch of other teeth from south america. I have no idea as to what kind of tooth this is.  Any help is greatly apppreciated.  Thanks a ton.

So are you guessing that this tooth is also from South America? This really makes me want to guess that the tooth most likely may be from Peru or Chile, but just a guess.

 

I also second Shellseeker. Now I'm really wanting to see what else you've got up there in your old storage! :popcorn:

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RJB
10 hours ago, Macrophyseter said:

So are you guessing that this tooth is also from South America?

 

  No, Not guessing.  I bought about 20 fossils from a guy in South America and this tooth was part of that box.

 

RB

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Sagebrush Steve
2 hours ago, RJB said:

 

  No, Not guessing.  I bought about 20 fossils from a guy in South America and this tooth was part of that box.

 

RB

So then it could be Prosqualodon, if I read Bosse right?

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Boesse
On 2/27/2018 at 4:33 PM, ynot said:

I see Boesse already did a nice write up on it.

(Nice of Him to use a picture of My tooth to lead the article.)

Small world, didn't realize it was yours! Or maybe I did, I wrote that a while ago. Didn't intend to pick on anyone; just did a google image search for Prosqualodon and that showed up. I strongly suspect most of the misinformation is perpretrated by various fossil dealers online (fossil dealer folklore, so to speak).

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Boesse

So RB's tooth is likely from a sperm whale, in my opinion; no fossils of Prosqualodon are (yet) known/reported from the Pacific coast of South America (they very likely will in the future, perhaps from the similarly aged Chilcatay Fm. of Peru). Prosqualodon has Squalodon-like teeth, shown below (P. davidis, early Miocene, Tasmania). As for the identity of this as the cetacean erroneously referred to by many people in North America as "Prosqualodon" - this specimen lacks the longitudinal swelling of the root, and instead the root is inflated on all sides - more of a sperm whale feature.image.thumb.png.5e56f190aa1408d5df06fe82c004470d.png

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ynot
1 hour ago, Boesse said:

just did a google image search for Prosqualodon and that showed up.

I do not know why it would show for that search.:headscratch:

It has only been pictured here on TFF (in fossil id and fossil of month) and as far as I can remember was never assumed to be Prosqualodon.

 

Regards,

Tony

 

PS Got no problem with You using any of My pictures.:thumbsu:

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jpc
On 2/27/2018 at 2:24 PM, Troodon said:

Bobby I just read (OK, skimmed) this.  I was attracted to the epiphyises part... unfused vertebral epiphyses means calving ground.  Our mammoth at work (Dee the mammoth) that was very old when it died; it has no replacement teeth and the ones it has are worn to nearly nothing.  Yet, many of its verts have unfused epiphyses.  Perhaps unfused epiphyses is also fossil folk lore.  

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