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-Andy-

Unknown large croc tooth from Georgia

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indominus rex

Deinosuchus? But don't take my word on that. But that's a monster tooth, nice find:).

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HoppeHunting

I’m no expert on this, but what I can say is that I think it’s more likely from a croc larger than Gavialosuchus/Thecachampsa solely based on size. This would be an abnormally large tooth from that genus. Deinosuchus seems feasible.

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ynot

@Jesuslover340 might know.

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Tidgy's Dad

That's a terrific tooth! :)

I have no idea what type of croc it's from but it's a lovely specimen! 

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ynot

oh, oh, oh... I got this one!

It is a ...

big daddiosuchus:thumbsu:

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-Andy-
17 minutes ago, Troodon said:

The geological map would argue against anything cretaceous near Savannah.   I think most of that portion of the state was under water during the cretaceous.

 

 

I agree. The geological maps I've seen indicate that area is far more likely of Quaternary age.

 

If I had seen the crown by itself without locality data, I would definitely think it's a Deinosuchus. Now I am curious to see if anyone have seen these kinda tooth from non-Cretaceous deposits.

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Fossildude19

Georgia County Map and Geologic Map:

 

georgia-county-map.jpg    3788621_orig.jpg  

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SailingAlongToo

@-Andy-

That is a gorgeous specimen you have there. Quite robust. It definitely looks like the Deinosuchus teeth we find in a Cretaceous lag deposit in SE NC. Mrs.SA2 and I have 15 or so in our personal collection. @Daleksec and @sixgill pete have collected the NC site and have some in their collections as well. I really can't think of anything else it could be, but I've never fossil hunted in GA, and other than Coastal Plains, I don't know much about its geology.

 

Given what you "probably" have, the location you found it and the known geology, I believe there is definitely some scientific significance,/ importance to your find. I recommend contacting some museums and universities for their opinions. My first thought is @Boesse of course. Even though he's a whale guy he may know a good reptile person. University of Florida has really good reptile folks and there is Dr. Hastings at the VA Museum of Natural History, who is a reptile specialist (and also graduated from the U of FL program.)

 

Keep us in the loop as you learn more on your mystery. It's very exciting!

 

Cheers,

SA2

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FossilDAWG

I agree that @Boesse would be the person to offer an authoritative opinion.  Personally I think Troodon has it with his link.  The Cretaceous is deeply buried in the Savannah area, and there are no fossiliferous Cretacous exposures upriver, so despite the similarities I think Deinosuchus can be discounted.  That assumes that the locality info is correct of course.

 

Don

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Paciphacops

Nice find. I'm really glad these big crocs became extinct!

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JohnBrewer

Not a tooth. That’s a witches finger as anyone can see. :D

 

7DB20CD4-E3AF-4E1B-BDBF-31CAECDDDDE1.jpeg.082a28cd69cb8f090ec4597c104af219.jpeg

 

Nice tooth!

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sixgill pete

Gavialosuchus? Is it known from the Miocene / Pliocene?  There are some very large croc teeth found at Lee Creek and they are Thecachampsa as far as I know. I have also seen a Thecachampsa tooth this size from the Belgrade Quarry in  North Carolina.

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Shellseeker

Wow.. Savannah, like the city directly above Jacksonville on the Atlantic... You definitely grow those gators big up there... Congratulations on a fantastic find:yay-smiley-1:

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-Andy-
14 hours ago, Boesse said:

Hey all - this tooth certainly falls within the range of variation for Gavialosuchus. @sixgill pete - Gavialosuchus and Thecachampsa are the same animal, with some using one name over the other.

 

Deinosuchus teeth, if memory serves, have strong longitudinal fluting. I've seen others claim to have discovered "Deinosuchus" fossils from Savannah, including a large premaxilla, but all seem to be consistent with Gavialosuchus just like we get here in Charleston.

 

Bobby

 

Thanks for the info!

 

I searched online for Gavialosuchus teeth pictures, and found this:

 

Gavialosuchus.JPG.e475aa04e16cbd0db15b3d23f67d2b91.JPG

 

The rear teeth on this Gavialosuchus jaw looks like a match for mine too.

 

gavialosuchus-americanus-miocene-crocodile-tate-museum-casper-college-FCR9GN.thumb.jpg.c30ec7d6fea5f4205f4260036427c7be.jpg

 

 

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Plax

any chance the provenance could be wrong?

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Jesuslover340

Provenance is everything...especially with crocodilian/crocodylomorph teeth, as they're not specialized like mammalian teeth. A croc tooth from one area can look EXACTLY like a croc tooth from a completely different age and location and yet, be from two completely different species. About the only way you can pin down species or even genus for crocodilians is knowing the provenance and subsequently knowing the species that have been described from the location from associated material such as a skull/jaw with intact teeth.

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siteseer
On March 9, 2018 at 7:21 AM, SailingAlongToo said:

@-Andy-

That is a gorgeous specimen you have there. Quite robust. It definitely looks like the Deinosuchus teeth we find in a Cretaceous lag deposit in SE NC. Mrs.SA2 and I have 15 or so in our personal collection. @Daleksec and @sixgill pete have collected the NC site and have some in their collections as well. I really can't think of anything else it could be, but I've never fossil hunted in GA, and other than Coastal Plains, I don't know much about its geology.

 

Given what you "probably" have, the location you found it and the known geology, I believe there is definitely some scientific significance,/ importance to your find. I recommend contacting some museums and universities for their opinions. My first thought is @Boesse of course. Even though he's a whale guy he may know a good reptile person. University of Florida has really good reptile folks and there is Dr. Hastings at the VA Museum of Natural History, who is a reptile specialist (and also graduated from the U of FL program.)

 

Keep us in the loop as you learn more on your mystery. It's very exciting!

 

Cheers,

SA2

 

If Jim Knight is at the Charleston Museum, he would be someone to contact.  He was at one of the SC museums years ago.

 

Jess

 

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-Andy-
On 3/11/2018 at 12:38 AM, Boesse said:

Hey all - this tooth certainly falls within the range of variation for Gavialosuchus. @sixgill pete - Gavialosuchus and Thecachampsa are the same animal, with some using one name over the other.

 

Deinosuchus teeth, if memory serves, have strong longitudinal fluting. I've seen others claim to have discovered "Deinosuchus" fossils from Savannah, including a large premaxilla, but all seem to be consistent with Gavialosuchus just like we get here in Charleston.

 

Bobby

 

Hi @Boesse, does this look like a Cetacean tooth to you? I emailed Dr David Schwimmer, and he replied this:

 

Interesting material, but definitely not from the Cretaceous. The isolated tooth is probably not crocodylian, but rather from a cetacean: the proportions of crown and root really don't match any I've seen, and the crown curvature is too extreme to be a posterior croc tooth.  I'm not expert on Miocene whales, but I know there were a number of toothed whales and dolphins around at the time.  You might check with the Calvert Museum for a better ID.

 

I trust Dr Schwimmer in croc matters, and I would like your input as well seeing as you have experience with whales.

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-Andy-
On 4/6/2018 at 8:56 AM, M Harvey said:

Any chance it could be a sea lion canine?  I pull this photo from the internet.

?auth=co&loc=en_US&id=66885&part=2

Mel10-23-10Allodesmus Sp..JPG.url

 

I don't think it is. But I am unsure now as the original ID of croc is in question.

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WhodamanHD
2 hours ago, -Andy- said:

check with the Calvert Museum for a better ID.

Stephen Godfrey from the CMM might be a good person to contact, as he is also an expert on ceteceans.

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