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Wrangellian

Would those 'oysters' in the upper left be Texigryphaea sp?

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Nimravis

Wow Kim just saw your post, great trip report and you found some great stuff, congrats. I am also a Funyun lover, but always need to have gum around to keep my breath Minty Fresh- Lol. Keep you the great hunts and send some warm weather this way.

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KimTexan
4 hours ago, Bobby Rico said:

 Oh now I know, we call them onion rings but the just onion flavour. Potato chips are called potato crisps . Monster munch is my favourite.

You have  found some lovely ammonites recently all big ones too.   :wub: 

DD4F9128-4FD5-44C7-A86E-7F1148DD73A4.jpeg

Pickled onion, I can’t say I’m familiar with that flavor, but it sounds a little like the salt and vinegar potato chips (crisps) we have here.

Yes, those things are back breaking to carry out. One place I had to make 5 trips to my car to get all that I found. Another place I had to leave 2 behind and hope they were there the next day.

At the rate I’m collecting I’ll be processing till I die. I’m hoping to find an ammonite or fossil utopia where the fossils are all matrix free. Only in my dreams I think or where there fossil lovers don’t abound.

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DevonianDigger

:envy: 

 

Definitely need to take a trip down to TX one of these days to do some collecting! Great finds, thanks for sharing!

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KimTexan
1 hour ago, Wrangellian said:

Would those 'oysters' in the upper left be Texigryphaea sp?

I believe they are Texigraphaea, but I’m not sure which. Maybe the washitaensis. They seemed to be too short, narrow and smooth for some of the others.

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Wrangellian

OK, I guess they're hard to tell apart... the ones I have are just labeled 'Texigryphaea sp.' and they look much like yours.

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RyanNREMTP

Those are some awesome finds.  I love finding echs that big, or intact for that matter.  Looks you have a great spot.

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sixgill pete

Great finds Kim. The echinoids are great, but I really like the ammonites. Something we have a great shortage of here in N.C.

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KimTexan
3 hours ago, sixgill pete said:

Great finds Kim. The echinoids are great, but I really like the ammonites. Something we have a great shortage of here in N.C.

I am acquiring quite a number of ammonites the past few months. I think 4 of my 5 trips intending to search for urchins resulted in numerous ammonites  and next to no echinoids. However, they almost all need matrix removal. I’m a bit challenged in that area when it’s large chunks or encased in matrix.

 One of my New Years fossil related goals was to expand my echinoid and ammonite collection’s diversity and the ID of them. I’m doing splendid in that goal. I think I’ve nearly doubled the species of ammonites and I’ve more that doubled my echinoid species diversity. I wish I could say I was having the same success with my goal of getting more sleep.

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sixgill pete
4 hours ago, KimTexan said:

I am acquiring quite a number of ammonites the past few months. I think 4 of my 5 trips intending to search for urchins resulted in numerous ammonites  and next to no echinoids. However, they almost all need matrix removal. I’m a bit challenged in that area when it’s large chunks or encased in matrix.

 One of my New Years fossil related goals was to expand my echinoid and ammonite collection’s diversity and the ID of them. I’m doing splendid in that goal. I think I’ve nearly doubled the species of ammonites and I’ve more that doubled my echinoid species diversity. I wish I could say I was having the same success with my goal of getting more sleep.

Sleep? What's sleep?

But seriously, congrats on your success with expanding your collection and the identifications. Finding new species is one thing, but sometimes the identification process can be mind numbing.

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siteseer
On 3/12/2018 at 10:31 AM, KimTexan said:

Do you know what genus the shark teeth come from? I was thinking the one on the right looks a little like a Cretolamna I have, but not quite. To be honest I’ve only found one other shark tooth ever and I know next to nothing about them. For some reason I must not have the eye for vertebrate fossils.

 

When I saw the first one I thought it was a sliver of brown glass, but there wasn’t any trash to speak of out there.

If I’d been standing upright I don’t think I would have ever seen either of them.

As far as the formation, I’m going off of what my Rockd app told me. Within a mile or so of the place is Kiamichi, but I think Kiamichi is mostly a dark clay. Then the Goodlands isn’t too far away either. It looked like Duck Creek to me, but I’m still learning my formations.

 

I agree that the one on the left is Cretalamna.  If the formation is Duck Creek or Goodland, and therefore Early Cretaceous, the other tooth looks unusual for that time and place.  Does it have side cusps?  It doesn't show a nutrient groove so it isn't an early sand tiger.  I thought it could be an early Scapanorhynchus but now think it's an Anomotodon tooth.   It's just that I've never seen one that old from Texas - something you might see of that time from France.  Can you give us a shot of the opposite side of the tooth?  Either I or others might be able to say more about it.

 

Jess

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Pemphix
On ‎12‎.‎03‎.‎2018 at 6:01 AM, KimTexan said:

 

Maybe my age was beginning to show (I’ll be 50 this week). 

 

Beside of all the fossil stuff, something needed to be said, too:

 

:yay-smiley-1::yay-smiley-1:HAPPY BIRTHDAY !!!!!   :yay-smiley-1::yay-smiley-1:

:raindance::raindance:

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siteseer

The other thing that needs to be said is that you should never go fossil collecting alone.  It's like swimming or hiking.  And another thing, always bring more water and Gatorade (or other electrolyte-replacing beverage) than you'll need.  Even if I'm collecting for only an afternoon, I bring a case of water, some bottled ice teas, and some Gatorade as well as some food.

 

I was once doing just some computer work in a room with no air-conditioning.  It was in the summer and I was sweating a bit the whole time.  On my way home I felt weird and had to put effort into concentrating on my driving, soon realizing I was probably dehydrated.  When I got home, I drank a bottle of ice tea and some water and felt a lot better. 

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Tidgy's Dad

What an exciting field report! 

Action, adventure, illness and chips! 

What more could one want? 

Thanks for sharing, Kim. :)

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joshuajbelanger

I’ve been itching to find a good invert spot.  All I have is stupid megs and mammoths!  :hearty-laugh:

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gwestbrook

Great report! Looks like fun. :)

 

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lcordova

Kim, congrats. I love echies, great finds.

When you find a spot by yourself is a great feeling.

Here in Houston are no fossils so always going to the DFW area is a must. I envy you..:)

Try to clean them a bit.

 

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KimTexan
On 3/16/2018 at 3:28 AM, Pemphix said:

 

Beside of all the fossil stuff, something needed to be said, too:

 

:yay-smiley-1::yay-smiley-1:HAPPY BIRTHDAY !!!!!   :yay-smiley-1::yay-smiley-1:

:raindance::raindance:

Thank you very much! That’s very nice of you!

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KimTexan
On 3/16/2018 at 12:44 AM, siteseer said:

 

I agree that the one on the left is Cretalamna.  If the formation is Duck Creek or Goodland, and therefore Early Cretaceous, the other tooth looks unusual for that time and place.  Does it have side cusps?  It doesn't show a nutrient groove so it isn't an early sand tiger.  I thought it could be an early Scapanorhynchus but now think it's an Anomotodon tooth.   It's just that I've never seen one that old from Texas - something you might see of that time from France.  Can you give us a shot of the opposite side of the tooth?  Either I or others might be able to say more about it.

 

Jess

Thanks for your comments. Here is the other side of the tooth. Sorry it isn’t the best pic. It is hard to take a good one with it being so small.

FF0D1CCB-08AD-448D-9986-D6E1F52ACFCE.thumb.jpeg.9b40b3d7be289ffa9b8f5099f6686e0e.jpeg

I took a TFF member and his lady friend from Kentucky out to the site yesterday. She found a tooth without the base that was almost twice this size. She also found a little shark vert. 

Oops I think I may have sent the wrong one. I thought the one on the right was the Cretalamna. I’ll get a pic of the other and send it.

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KimTexan

Here are pics of the other tooth. 

 

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9DF0B8C4-EC4B-4443-A980-C97AF71F73DE.jpeg

 

Hunting alone is inevitable. It is difficult to find women who are as into hunting as I am and who are willing to push themselves physically like I do or be willing to endure weather extremes or get as dirty/muddy as I’m willing to get for the sake of hunting fossils.

There are most likely more men who may be up to the challenge and I’m sure they could out do me any day physically, but they generally develop an unwanted attraction to and interest in me and want more than mere friendship. My life is too complicated for that right now.

I’d love to have a hunting buddy who is willing to be just friends, but so far I’m not having any luck on that front. I’m having some fossil luck though.  

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