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HoppeHunting

Paleohypotodus?

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HoppeHunting

Hey all,

 

Hope all my fellow East Coast dwellers are holding up alright after the storm. We got hit pretty hard with snow in Northern VA.

 

Anyway, this tooth was found at my Purse State Park trip a few months back. It looks quite different from the majority of the teeth I found on my trip. I used fossilguy.com to compare it to common fossils from the Aquia Formation, and it looks very much like a Paleohypotodus rutoti tooth. Can I get any confirmation on this ID or is it something else? It is slightly over 1/2 inch, but that's with a dinged tip. It has a distinctive U-shaped root that is very wide and flat when viewed from the side. The most unique things about the tooth, however, are the cusps. They are very worn down, to the point where they appear as nothing more than a couple of black lumps. The crazy thing is that it looks like there are three on each side. I believe this is typical of P. rutoti but it's hard to tell because the pictures online have sharper cusps. Does anyone have an ID for this one? And if so, I'd love to know a little more about the shark itself, because it is seldom mentioned online. All I know is that fossilguy has it listed as a "Mackerel Type Shark". 

 

Thanks in advance for help with the ID. Hoppe hunting!

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SailingAlongToo

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Al Dente

I think Palaeohypotodus is a good guess. Probably too big to be Odontaspis winkleri. Have you looked at Elasmo? They have a section on Aquia teeth.

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non-remanié

Agree. Palaeohypotodus.   Too robust for O. winkleri

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WhodamanHD

I agree with the consensus, but I’m going to consult the book tomorrow to make sure.

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MarcoSr

Agree with Eric and Steve that the tooth is Palaeohypotodus based upon robustness and number of damaged cusplets.

 

Marco Sr.

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