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MeargleSchmeargl

The mysterious Carboniferous of Georgia: Tips?

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MeargleSchmeargl

I keep hearing about Penn/Miss sites near the GA/AL border, and seeing that my :plant: collection is severely lacking, I am dying to find a formation exposure that isn't on the opposite end of the globe from where I am. I found some hope of finding a place with this scholarly article on NW GA (though it's an article that's older than my grandparents):

 

https://epd.georgia.gov/sites/epd.georgia.gov/files/related_files/site_page/B-62.pdf

 

2 formations stuck out from what I could make of it from my first quick skim: 

 

• Vandever Formation

• Rockcastle Formation

 

These two appear to produce some pretty nice Penn. flora. Would love to go and hunt these formations for their treasures! Locations and availability information? 

 

Thanks in advance! :D

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Raggedy Man

Should skim through journals and look for locations as sites are being over hunted and good spots are hard to come by.  I refuse to give locations anymore as the last time I did I went back and saw it had been heavily collected and someone had used prybars to break apart the face. There are notices now saying collecting is prohibited. 

 

"Loose lips sink ships"

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Fossildude19

Maybe replies can be made via PM. ;) 

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Uncle Siphuncle
1 minute ago, KimTexan said:

In Texas I get out the USGS maps and look for the formations I want to visit & where they occur. Then I use Google maps, the satellite view to scope out exposures. I drop pins or mark the spots that look like they have potential. I’ll generally pic 3-5 locations within a short distance of each other and then plan a trip to the area. I look for road cuts, creeks, rivers, gullies, escarpments, construction sites, bluffs and lakesides or eroded areas on satellite view.

 

Here in Texas 1-2 spots will usually do the trick for me. I’ve rarely struck out and not found any fossils. I have had an instance where I got there and there were keep out signs everywhere.

The trick is knowing the formation that have the fossils in specific areas. It sounds like you know which formations you wish to hunt. So the USGS with Google maps may help you find the spots.

Another trick is being able to spot the formations and strata that are fossiliferous when you see them from a distance.

I live on top of the Ozan Formation in Texas, but there is zilch here. Absolutely nothing at all. But the Ozan an hour away has all kinds of very cool stuff in the North Sulfur River. The formation varies in different areas. The black clay has practically nothing. The gray clay is where it seems to be at, but it has a certain look to it. If you’ve hunted enough you know what I mean.

By the USGS and Google satalite view method I have discovered some great spots that aren’t over hunted. The drive by method works great too. I drive by, it looks interesting, I stop and take a look and hit the jackpot. That in large part works because I’m familiar with what the fossil bearing material looks like. There are so many formations I’m not familiar with yet though. I learn as I go.

Sage advice!  You beat me to it.

 

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Paciphacops

Pennsylvanian fossils can be found in creek beds, etc., but are usually very weathered. The best will from coal mines. Active mines are best, but may be hard to gain access. Old strip mines can be great places too, but many have been reclaimed, making it harder to find exposed fossils. Geologic topo maps often show areas that have been strip mined, so that is where I would start looking. Another tool that I find extremely useful is Google maps satellite view. You can easily see old quarries and mines, and you can also check out road cuts via the street view feature along most major roads.

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Raggedy Man
1 hour ago, Fossildude19 said:

Maybe replies can be made via PM. ;) 

Tim is spot on here.

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FossilDAWG

Maybe I'm wrong but I'm pretty sure you have asked this question before.  I'll repeat the answer I gave then.  The fossils come from old mine dumps, which are located on private property.  The Georgia Mineralogical Society occasionally organizes a field trip there.  The dumps are overgrown so you have to dig and pull out chunks of shale to split.  If the property owner were to find people tresspassing and digging holes they would likely close access altogether; as it is they allow access only to clubs.  Natural exposures are few and are located in a state park where digging and collecting is illegal.

Sign up with the GMS and wait for a trip to come up, or talk to the field trip committee about organizing a trip.

 

Don

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Fossildude19

Nothing like information from those in the know. :) 

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MeargleSchmeargl
1 hour ago, FossilDAWG said:

Maybe I'm wrong but I'm pretty sure you have asked this question before.  I'll repeat the answer I gave then.  The fossils come from old mine dumps, which are located on private property.  The Georgia Mineralogical Society occasionally organizes a field trip there.  The dumps are overgrown so you have to dig and pull out chunks of shale to split.  If the property owner were to find people tresspassing and digging holes they would likely close access altogether; as it is they allow access only to clubs.  Natural exposures are few and are located in a state park where digging and collecting is illegal.

Sign up with the GMS and wait for a trip to come up, or talk to the field trip committee about organizing a trip.

 

Don

I asked? May have been from many years ago the first time I learned of this website.

 

And as far as finding plant stuff in GA, this probably means I'm not going anytime soon, then (at least for Penn stuff). 

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goatinformationist
7 hours ago, FossilDAWG said:

Maybe I'm wrong but I'm pretty sure you have asked this question before.  I'll repeat the answer I gave then.  The fossils come from old mine dumps, which are located on private property.  The Georgia Mineralogical Society occasionally organizes a field trip there.  The dumps are overgrown so you have to dig and pull out chunks of shale to split.  If the property owner were to find people tresspassing and digging holes they would likely close access altogether; as it is they allow access only to clubs.  Natural exposures are few and are located in a state park where digging and collecting is illegal.

Sign up with the GMS and wait for a trip to come up, or talk to the field trip committee about organizing a trip.

 

Don

Thank you FD,

 

Yes the GMS (gamineral.org) collects at the site of America's first open pit coal mine, frequently.  My son found a large specimen that keeps the lines open to the ever questing Tellus Museum.  Please search the GMS website for field trip photos and consider joining at the family membership rate of $25  per year.  It won't break the bank and the fabulous pee-in-your pants Summer Auction is only a few months away.  Always happy to have new members in the nearly one thousand membership roll (yeah you read that right). 

 

Same goes for you FossilDAWG.

 

Rocks, minerals, crystals, fossils, lapidary, lap equipment, lots'a food, and professional assists are all in store.

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MeargleSchmeargl

So the GMS is my best bet from what I hear. It'd be a good opportunity to show off my finds as well...

 

 

Sounds good to me! :dinosmile:

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goatinformationist

Yeah, you can show everybody your finds and they will be happy to see them and comment on them.  Oh and club meetings always have door prizes for all.

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FossilDAWG
1 hour ago, goatinformationist said:

Same goes for you FossilDAWG.

 

Actually, I am a member, though I may have neglected to send in my dues for this year.

 

Don

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