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Pseudogygites

Hello again TTF! This will be my second post about my finds from my first trip to the peace river! This post is dedicated to one of my favourite finds and one of my favourite animals, the mammoth! During my trip to the peace river, I found many beautiful fossils myself, but I seemed to have had the best luck searching through other people's garbage. The location where I went to collect in was already visited many times by other people. Everything unwanted that turns up in their shifters is usually thrown to the banks, creating garbage piles. One particularly productive garbage pile produced many of my favourite Dugong ribs, my only meg (more on that later) and a mammoth tooth! How someone could look at these things and throw them away is beyond me. Unfortunately, the tooth was already fragmented when I found it. I believe that all the fragments came from the same tooth, though, because some fit together perfectly! I also have a question about this tooth. Is it possible to identify the species of mammoth from the tooth, either from its features or by looking at the known species of mammoth present in Florida? Thanks!

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WhodamanHD

I believe that the Colombian mammoth is the only mammoth there. Cool finds.

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digit

The most common mammoth tooth found in the Peace River is the Columbian Mammoth, Mammuthus columbi, (note the 'u' and not 'o' in the name). It is named for 'Columbia' the rather poetic name for the Americas (think Washington, District of Columbia as opposed to the South American country of [similarly spelled] 'Colombia').

 

There is also a much less common Hayes Mammoth, Mammuthus haroldcooki, which can be differentiated by wider (and fewer) plates composing the tooth. A quick forum search dug up this old (but still informative) post:

 

http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/14135-mammoth/

 

 

Cheers.

 

-Ken

 

P.S.: One man's junk is another man's treasure.

 

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EMP
8 minutes ago, digit said:

The most common mammoth tooth found in the Peace River is the Columbian Mammoth, Mammuthus columbi, (note the 'u' and not 'o' in the name). It is named for 'Columbia' the rather poetic name for the Americas (think Washington, District of Columbia as opposed to the South American country of [similarly spelled] 'Colombia').

 

There is also a much less common Hayes Mammoth, Mammuthus haroldcooki, which can be differentiated by wider (and fewer) plates composing the tooth. A quick forum search dug up this old (but still informative) post:

 

http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/14135-mammoth/

 

 

Cheers.

 

-Ken

 

P.S.: One man's junk is another man's treasure.

 

 

Colombia is the Spanish version of Columbia. They both come from the same guy's name - Christopher Columbus. Funny enough America also is based off of a European's name, Amerigo Vespucci. Aside from that, Columbia is more of the female representation of the US than poetic name. It's basically the US equivalent to Britannia, which is the female personification of Britain. 

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digit

Quite true--I'm glad (I guess) that I live in America and not Vespuccia. :P

 

 

Cheers.

 

-Ken

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