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Max-fossils

Shark tooth from Zeeland

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Max-fossils

Hi all, 

 

I bought this small tooth at the market of Middelburg (Netherlands). 

It's from somewhere in Zeeland (south-west Netherlands). The age is either Eocene (rare) or Mio-Pliocene. 

The sellers didn't know from which beach exactly in Zeeland it is from, which is a shame, but doesn't matter too much because basically all the teeth from Zeeland are from the same sediments.

 

What species do you guys think this is? I know it is quite worn, but I think the condition is still good enough to make a good ID out of it. No signs of serrations. One big cusp, and the sign of a small one on the other side. If any more pictures are needed, let me know!

 

Thanks in advance for your replies!

 

Max

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Max-fossils

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Max-fossils

There's also a second tooth, with the same provenance. 

 

#2

 

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gigantoraptor

If there were serrations I would say this looks like my small Otodus auriculatus (rare) from the Eocene-Oligocene. If there are really no serrations I think Jaekelotodus sp.

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Max-fossils
Just now, gigantoraptor said:

If there were serrations I would say this looks like my small Otodus auriculatus (rare) from the Eocene-Oligocene. If there are really no serrations I think Jaekelotodus sp.

Ok thanks. Nah I don't think it's an auri. Jaekelotodus does seem to match decently though. 

Just to make sure, this is about #1 right?

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WhodamanHD
6 hours ago, Max-fossils said:

Nah I don't think it's an auri.

I agree, they tend to have jagged serrations, If it had worn those away the root would be just as worn.

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Max-fossils
14 hours ago, WhodamanHD said:

I agree, they tend to have jagged serrations, If it had worn those away the root would be just as worn.

Yep. So what could this one be?

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WhodamanHD
15 minutes ago, Max-fossils said:

Yep. So what could this one be?

Posterior Striatolamia microta methinks

From Here

E34E505F-88A2-4C6F-9FE4-B1D4805BE178.png

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Max-fossils
1 minute ago, WhodamanHD said:

Posterior Striatolamia macrota methinks

From Here

 

1

Ah! That's probably it. Thanks a lot Mason!

What about the second one?

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Anomotodon

I agree, first one is posterior Striatolamia and last one is lateral Hypotodus verticalis, also Eocene. Here is one from elasmo.

image.jpeg.15f9269b3d2d038f506dd912e975baf6.jpeg

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Max-fossils
6 minutes ago, Anomotodon said:

I agree, first one is posterior Striatolamia and last one is lateral Hypotodus verticalis, also Eocene. Here is one from elasmo.

 

3

Awesome, thanks!

Cool that both are Eocene, as these are rarer than the Mio-Pliocene teeth. 

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