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Plantguy

So I've been looking around at the pile in the garage, trying to get rid of some of the junk and taking some photos that I thought you all might be interested in. 

 

I think some of you may have picked on my fascination with earbones...If you dont have that fascination keep scrolling....Well, here's one partial example with multiple views that was a little more different than most but I think its a whale bulla. Its preservation is a little different and there is an extra cavity where normally you would have solid bone...just my guess anyways. Also another shot of it on the very left showing some of the other bullas and its relative difference. Maybe its something completely different. 

5ac9fce2b680c_Bullapanorama.thumb.jpg.a4764c9ef790b753fb6303f02a707435.jpg

5ac9fce35ce0c_Bullacomparisonpanorama.thumb.jpg.066afa3f223d61227310bb600a8a8e15.jpg

 

Here's a neat little blob of casts of sponge borings and I've been trying to get a real sharp close up of what I think is a bryozoan in the same matrix but its the best I can do. The unknown is really cool but I just cant capture the real coolness with my cell phone..The scaley looking fragment is approximately 6mm long.The preservation detail is remarkable given its only a fragment. 

5ac9fdde9a0f4_thumbnail(11).thumb.jpg.762ea0f5ddf57510909dd7de21861290.jpg

5ac9fdde0a4d6_Unknownpossiblebryozoanthumbnailsharpened(5).thumb.jpg.41d5c7cfda6f7f31fcdf0b0277639556.jpg

 

I suppose I really should put this in the ID section as I was wondering if these are all same Sconsia species. S. hodgii? Not that important...Didnt realize I had 4 of them until recently. A couple of them have taller spires and I just cant decide if they are all the same or not. 

5ac9fed52d68a_Sconsiapanorama.thumb.jpg.5ec26ed9d12b8bf980930dd9c71f211c.jpg

 

Here's a Chesapecten. C madisonius I think(photos of after and before) that I put in 2-3 hrs here and there trying to clean. Was using dental picks and a brass brush to remove the sandy matrix and endless soaking. I could do more I suppose but I dont have the patience for prepping. I had ideas of separating the valves but maybe in another lifetime. It has all kinds of very small sponge boring holes and grooves that make me absolute crazy. LOL.  Was hoping to find that it had attached barnacles but they were gone and I only had scars left.  Those of you who have that patience to prep I applaud you!

5aca02922a4f3_Chesapectenpanoramafinish.thumb.jpg.cd1b90a9c1e1f3232818e40e14e10005.jpg

5aca02ae45f2e_Chesapectenpanorama.thumb.jpg.f15e9e83946a0274f2497240c873dbf0.jpg

 

Lastly for all you barnacle and brach fans...I know there are thousands of you..I am one..LOL. So a complete brach Discinisca lugrubris around here is pretty rare. I only have a few and this is the 2nd of 2 brach/barnacle associations I have. What makes this barnacle on top of a brach extra special special was that when I recently was looking for plates/stuff inside the barnacle (which had no plates and mostly just sand)  I found another brach...a tiny juvenile! Yeah!

5aca083bae494_Brachpanorama.thumb.jpg.b75211b27eb9d71590a34eb32e45cea1.jpg

So its time for breakfast...Continued hunting success!

Regards, Chris  

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Shellseeker

Chris,

You are the 2nd fossil friend in the last month who is doing the UNTHINKABLE!!!!! Cleaning up the fossils in their garage... Do not let my wife hear of this... the pain... the PAIN!!!:doh!::(

In the meantime, I love that Bulla and all things whale... it looks pathological. 

Thanks for sharing.   Jack

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Tidgy's Dad

Love the ear bones. 

I guess the sponge is Entobia sp? 

Yes, that's a bryozoan for sure, very pretty one too! :wub:

And the brachiopod/ barnacle association is just wow! 

Thanks for sharing the contents of your garage. 

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MikeR

Hi Chris

 

Cool stuff as usual.  The sponge borings could be calcareous algae which is the main calcite contributor in carbonate environments but I am not sure.  The Sconsia are indeed S. hodgii.  Petuch (1994) described a high-spired Sconsia prolongata however Beu (2001) synonymized it as a variation within S. hodgii.  Some have called the South Florida Chesapecten as C. jeffersonius based upon the number of ribs however Thomas Waller of the Smithsonian calls them an early form of C. madisonius.

 

Mike

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Plantguy
7 hours ago, Shellseeker said:

Chris,

You are the 2nd fossil friend in the last month who is doing the UNTHINKABLE!!!!! Cleaning up the fossils in their garage... Do not let my wife hear of this... the pain... the PAIN!!!:doh!::(

In the meantime, I love that Bulla and all things whale... it looks pathological. 

Thanks for sharing.   Jack

Thanks Jack. Sorry man, I wont say anything. if it helps there are fossils on our kitchen table on "my side" and in "my ofc/room". Garage is the initial (mostly piling/pre storage) and cleaning/prep area....The wife can sit down on her side of the kitchen table but she has quite the pile of diff stuff going there herself. LOL. 

Regards, Chris 

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Plantguy
6 hours ago, MikeR said:

Hi Chris

 

Cool stuff as usual.  The sponge borings could be calcareous algae which is the main calcite contributor in carbonate environments but I am not sure.  The Sconsia are indeed S. hodgii.  Petuch (1994) described a high-spired Sconsia prolongata however Beu (2001) synonymized it as a variation within S. hodgii.  Some have called the South Florida Chesapecten as C. jeffersonius based upon the number of ribs however Thomas Waller of the Smithsonian calls them an early form of C. madisonius.

 

Mike

Thanks Mike. I was thinking they were borings as there are what appears to be fine filaments running between the orbs/pellets. Here's a shot that shows a few of them although they might still be hard to see. Does that rule out the algae or is it possible to have both represented. Thanks for the info on the Sconsia and Chesapecten

 

Regards, Chris 

 

 

possible entobia filaments gallery thumbnail (5).jpg

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Plantguy
7 hours ago, Tidgy's Dad said:

Love the ear bones. 

I guess the sponge is Entobia sp? 

Yes, that's a bryozoan for sure, very pretty one too! :wub:

And the brachiopod/ barnacle association is just wow! 

Thanks for sharing the contents of your garage. 

Thanks for the comments. If it is indeed a sponge trace I believe it would be Entobia. Mike raised the possibility about calcareous algae so I might have it wrong though. Yep I do like those brachs! Kids are coming soon so I'm trying to move some more of the fossils around so I have more space to move more stuff in the garage...hoping to take some more fossil photos as I get distracted. Been out there most of the day....LOL. 

 

Regards, Chris  

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Al Dente
21 hours ago, Plantguy said:

Lastly for all you barnacle and brach fans...I know there are thousands of you..I am one..LOL. So a complete brach Discinisca lugrubris around here is pretty rare. I only have a few and this is the 2nd of 2 brach/barnacle associations I have. What makes this barnacle on top of a brach extra special special was that when I recently was looking for plates/stuff inside the barnacle (which had no plates and mostly just sand)  I found another brach...a tiny juvenile! Yeah!

 

I also have a Discinisca lugrubris barnacle association. Mine is from the Rushmere Member of the Yorktown Formation in North Carolina. Also from the same formation are these barnacle shell associations. A cup and saucer shell with a barnacle and a large limpet with a barnacle.

 

 

barnacleBrachiopod.jpg

barnacleCupSaucer.jpg

barnacleLimpet.jpg

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MikeR
On 4/8/2018 at 5:56 PM, Plantguy said:

Thanks for the comments. If it is indeed a sponge trace I believe it would be Entobia. Mike raised the possibility about calcareous algae so I might have it wrong though. Yep I do like those brachs! Kids are coming soon so I'm trying to move some more of the fossils around so I have more space to move more stuff in the garage...hoping to take some more fossil photos as I get distracted. Been out there most of the day....LOL. 

 

Regards, Chris  

 

Take a look at this video about calcareous algae Link

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Plantguy
16 hours ago, Al Dente said:

I also have a Discinisca lugrubris barnacle association. Mine is from the Rushmere Member of the Yorktown Formation in North Carolina. Also from the same formation are these barnacle shell associations. A cup and saucer shell with a barnacle and a large limpet with a barnacle.

 

Those are awesome--thanks for showing them! Especially the Discinsica! Mine was from the Tamiami formation here in FL. I have some other barnacle associations in the garage and will have to photograph some of them---the garage is far from being organized so I'll be out there for a long time over the next several weeks. 

 

Regards, Chris 

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Plantguy
4 hours ago, MikeR said:

 

Take a look at this video about calcareous algae Link

Thanks Mike! I'll have to show you some more examples I have and get your opinion. There is also a previous thread somewhere where I got the original Entobia ID for something similar. I think its in a trace fossil thread I had but I cant find it at the moment. Thanks again for the help. 

 

Regards, Chris 

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Ludwigia

Ooooooooooooo! That Chesapecten is just gorgeous :wub:

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MikeR
8 hours ago, Plantguy said:

Thanks Mike! I'll have to show you some more examples I have and get your opinion. There is also a previous thread somewhere where I got the original Entobia ID for something similar. I think its in a trace fossil thread I had but I cant find it at the moment. Thanks again for the help. 

 

Regards, Chris 

 

Roger could probably tell you for sure.

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Plantguy
On 4/10/2018 at 7:53 AM, Al Dente said:

I think they are sponge borings. Here are a couple images of boring sponges I took from the Eocene Castle Hayne Formation.

 

 

Those do look very similar to what I think I have. Thanks for the great photos--neat specimens! 

 

Regards, Chris 

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Plantguy
On 4/10/2018 at 7:33 AM, MikeR said:

 

Roger could probably tell you for sure.

Thanks Mike, I was gonna take some new photos but I've managed to lose another phone so I am also without phone/camera now! Embarassing!! LOL But my own dumb fault.

 

Regards, Chris 

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Plantguy

So here's one that I was gonna ask about but just found the specimen again. I was reminded of it when someone posted a black banded unknown from Northern California recently and the consensus was banded chert.

 

My question is what is this one?  Same deal? Its just a pebble at 2.5cm long and I was guessing inorganic but it has the banded look and almost appears to be porous and bone-like--since its so polished its really hard to tell. Are there any periotics or coprolites that would show internal banding? 5ad2a666940da_unknownpebble.thumb.jpg.95a175b8435372da7cb57e71151fd860.jpgThis is from Manatee County. I've seen cherts around but do we have black/gray banded cherts from around central florida? I'll have to do some more digging in the garage as I think I have a couple more of these somewhere.

Regards, Chris 

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Plantguy

Here's another shot that may show an example of the calcareous algae showing more of a flat ellipse shape (red arrow ) along with the more irregular shaped borings above...Not sure either what the narrow elongated wavy structure is just above the ellipse and to the right..possibly a burrow cast?.

5ad2b406069a6_thumbnail(12)_LI.jpg.7d310785502e3424fcd3b0c86243aaa0.jpg

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caldigger
On 4/8/2018 at 5:56 AM, Plantguy said:

Here's a Chesapecten. C madisonius I think(photos of after and before) that I put in 2-3 hrs here and there trying to clean. Was using dental picks and a brass brush to remove the sandy matrix and endless soaking. I could do more I suppose but I dont have the patience for prepping. I had ideas of separating the valves but maybe in another lifetime. It has all kinds of very small sponge boring holes and grooves that make me absolute crazy. LOL.  Was hoping to find that it had attached barnacles but they were gone and I only had scars left.  Those of you who have that patience to prep I applaud you!

5aca02922a4f3_Chesapectenpanoramafinish.thumb.jpg.cd1b90a9c1e1f3232818e40e14e10005.jpg

5aca02ae45f2e_Chesapectenpanorama.thumb.jpg.f15e9e83946a0274f2497240c873dbf0.jpg

Please don't do the unspeakable and separate the halves!  It is far more appealing as a whole piece.

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Plantguy
On 4/10/2018 at 4:45 AM, Ludwigia said:

Ooooooooooooo! That Chesapecten is just gorgeous :wub:

 

10 hours ago, caldigger said:

Please don't do the unspeakable and separate the halves!  It is far more appealing as a whole piece.

Thanks guys! I'll probably leave this scallop alone as its pretty nice and I dont have a level of confidence that I can separate them without breaking the dang thing. I do have some others that I plan to open that I'm curious about. I'm wanting to know what kinds of matrix/sediment and other material has gotten inside and its makeup. Did these guys meet their demise in situ? Some of the others are unfortunately damaged but I am looking for really small stuff and they tend to accumulate larger pieces of stuff...I know I'm dreaming but very small shark teeth, and the elusive Ecphora which is alluding me and the wildest idea---pearls. I know Im crazy and the likely hood is very slim but I keep looking, especially in some of the larger oysters...

Regards, Chris 

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Plantguy
On 4/9/2018 at 6:34 AM, Al Dente said:

I also have a Discinisca lugrubris barnacle association. Mine is from the Rushmere Member of the Yorktown Formation in North Carolina. Also from the same formation are these barnacle shell associations. A cup and saucer shell with a barnacle and a large limpet with a barnacle.

 

 

Those are cool! Associated fossils like those are special in my book-- thanks for showing those. Here' are several that I have..I think the most interesting is a Strombus that has a barnacle where the shell is actually beginning to envelope it.  Must have been a little more effort to move along dragging it when it grew at that angle--must have been plow like. 

5afecab7d78b5_Morebarnacleassociations.thumb.jpg.18312478f2cf2b06332379ff2695ec80.jpg

 

IMG_20180518_002043.thumb.jpg.54494f780ff943f326064b8986cded9c.jpg

Edited by Plantguy
added photo

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Plantguy

Here's a couple more different things from some old APAC spoils I have from awhile back...A nicer big Chicoreus with its spire beginning to deteriorate and a bunch of the Cancellarias...I think there are a number of species here..I think the larger one is C. conradiana. 

5afecd4b4102a_Chicoreuspanorama.thumb.jpg.a0a5d3f6e64560b3eca6e6a1b1f417f0.jpg

5afecd49e2f25_Cancellariapanorama.thumb.jpg.c8b20fa21b66168fb4d95459861c1833.jpg

I think one of these is one of the Milthas..both valves still attached..I'm gonna leave them together. 5afecdddc5118_Milthatypespanorama.thumb.jpg.fbc2b74ad626d0b2c57fe6abb1fabd6a.jpg

 

This last one is kind of curious...In the broken Vermicularia tubes there are 3 little orb like somethings...not sure if they are small bivalves..I guess I have to figure a way of extracting them without damaging them. 

5afece683f14f_Vermiculariaunknowns.thumb.jpg.03c89b1869f211a537ae63c5b82ff02d.jpg

 

 

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Plantguy

I had included this above but I was still wondering...Is there such a thing as banded phosphate? in lieu of this being a worn banded chert? 

5afed111a0540_unknownpebble.thumb.jpg.60b07ca2f80f0ae401e0be4571f0764a.jpg

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Tidgy's Dad
6 hours ago, Plantguy said:

Here's a couple more different things from some old APAC spoils I have from awhile back...A nicer big Chicoreus with its spire beginning to deteriorate and a bunch of the Cancellarias...I think there are a number of species here..I think the larger one is C. conradiana. 

5afecd4b4102a_Chicoreuspanorama.thumb.jpg.a0a5d3f6e64560b3eca6e6a1b1f417f0.jpg

5afecd49e2f25_Cancellariapanorama.thumb.jpg.c8b20fa21b66168fb4d95459861c1833.jpg

I think one of these is one of the Milthas..both valves still attached..I'm gonna leave them together. 5afecdddc5118_Milthatypespanorama.thumb.jpg.fbc2b74ad626d0b2c57fe6abb1fabd6a.jpg

 

This last one is kind of curious...In the broken Vermicularia tubes there are 3 little orb like somethings...not sure if they are small bivalves..I guess I have to figure a way of extracting them without damaging them. 

5afece683f14f_Vermiculariaunknowns.thumb.jpg.03c89b1869f211a537ae63c5b82ff02d.jpg

 

 

I'm sure you're right and something's got into some of the tubes, probably by chance or maybe by design after death of the Vermiclaria. 

On the other hand, long shot, did this species have an operculum? 

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Plantguy
16 minutes ago, Tidgy's Dad said:

I'm sure you're right and something's got into some of the tubes, probably by chance or maybe by design after death of the Vermiclaria. 

On the other hand, long shot, did this species have an operculum? 

Good question. I was trying to figure that out but havent found a description of the critter...Since the growth direction seems to be from top to bottom of the photo on the left, the little guys look to be filling in damage/holes at the beginning/base, the narrow end of a tube--I would expect if it had an operculum it would be showing up at the top of the larger tube openings...I wonder if you could have another immature guy occupy an older tube? I guess I need to go extract one and see if that holds any clues or contact someone like Mike who probably knows its anatomy/growth history...@MikeR. 

Thanks for the looks and the question.

Regards, Chris 

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