Jump to content
DE&i

Prehistoric 'Sea Monster' May Be Largest That Ever Lived

Recommended Posts

TqB

Yes, fantastic find, Paul - I had no idea that ichthyosaurs could get anywhere that large.   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
steelhead9

Here's a huge one from China

 

 

.output.jpg.33f5971ece197eb924bbc944d129f5fa.thumb.jpg.a6caaa6ee47ed03601e8f67e6e41db12.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Macrophyseter

Wow, what a big guy :trilosurprise:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Welsh Wizard

Well done Paul. It's a great find and a great paper.

 

Nick

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tidgy's Dad

Congratulations, Paul! :yay-smiley-1:

Very interesting and a terrific find! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
paulgdls

thanks guys, much appreciated! 

 

That Chinese shastasaurid looks remarkably well preserved. The front limb bones have very wide spacing between elements. Do you have more info. please?

 

regards

 

Paul

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DE&i

Interesting observation @paulgdlsAndrzej Wolniewicz examined the family Shastasauridae in detail. A PhD student based at the University of Oxford. But Im guessing you already knew that. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
paulgdls

Hi Darren,

 

No, I didn't know that, but Dean Lomax told me that Wolniewicz  had commented on twitter. We don't disagree with what he says but in the paper we only stated a probable affinity to Shastasauridae but this was tentative in the absence of any other evidence. Dean and I feel that the Bristol Channel material is most likely from a new genus but until more turns up we can't define one.

 

regards

 

Paul

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DE&i

Hi Paul, 

 

I totally understand your reasoning and now a wonderful debate is in full swing. It's nice to hear academics are scratching  heads in their chosen topics. I find that's the great thing about new discoveries, especially when the term 'probable' is used. It gives all those in the know something extra to think about. And something for amatuer collectors to present them with. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Auspex

Well done, Sir!

This really changes the narrative for the late Triassic there. Methinks there's probably some corrective labeling to be made in the collections...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Fossildude19

Congratulations, Paul.  :)  :fistbump:

Here's hoping you are able to find more of the creatures!  :popcorn:

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
indominus rex

Congratulations Paul:yay-smiley-1::dinothumb:.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
JohnJ

Topic moved to our Partners in Paleontology forum.  :)

 

@paulgdls A wonderful discovery and follow through, sir!

bowing.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
steelhead9
On 4/10/2018 at 2:41 PM, paulgdls said:

thanks guys, much appreciated! 

 

That Chinese shastasaurid looks remarkably well preserved. The front limb bones have very wide spacing between elements. Do you have more info. please?

 

regards

 

Paul

 

I, unfortunately, do not have detailed info on this specimen. I will try to find out more. I am guessing the front paddle bones are either carved from matrix or composited. 

Wonderful find of yours, by the way!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
RJB

Wow!  85 feet long!  How cool is that.

 

RB

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
old bones

How wonderful! Congratulations.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×