Jump to content
KimTexan

Eagle Ford and Kamp Ranch Dallas, Texas trip

Recommended Posts

KimTexan

This is a paper on the Eagle Ford formation that I found, which was informative.

 

FossilZonesEagleFord.pdf

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tidgy's Dad

Nice report, and some beautiful photos. 

Loved the flowers and the bird, not a type we have here so always interesting to see.

Glad you found at least a couple of nice fossils too. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Darktooth

Excellent report and great pictures! I really like the ammo plate and the sharktooth!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
PFOOLEY

This is very cool...

 

FC902D76-0BE1-465F-9270-FDC6DB65B336.jpeg.d3487c29b12a7f279d219366aa7aa3f3.jpeg.e1470f3ff4f3d9480274d6545de508c7.jpeg

 

...looks like both gracile and robust forms of Collignoniceras woollgari. Nice find.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Fossildude19

Great report and some nice finds. 
Congratulations on that ammonite plate. 

Very cool.

 

Thanks for posting. Kim.  :) 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
bone2stone

Thanks off taking is out on your trip.

Well we did not have to walk it.

Sounds like tough undergrowth.

Wonderful hash plates, no prep needed on the tooth (Cretolamna) I think.

The prioniclonus (Prionitropis) should prep nicely but that Camp Ranch matrix is some unforgiving stuff.

Best use some professional advice or have it prepped for you.

An airscribe is the best tool for the job.

An electric scribe won't give you the results you need. You would destroy several scribes and still not get it done well.

Even with an air scribe it would need further prep with abrasive air.

The deposit you guys were in has yielded a lot of "pearls" over the years.

Often found in these conglomerates and associated with Inoceramus remains.

That area sounds like a couple of areas I frequent.

 

Jess B

 

BTW, that material is where my wife found the "first found" Dallas County Texas regular echinoids known. (Phymasoma)

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
KimTexan
1 hour ago, PFOOLEY said:

This is very cool...

 

FC902D76-0BE1-465F-9270-FDC6DB65B336.jpeg.d3487c29b12a7f279d219366aa7aa3f3.jpeg.e1470f3ff4f3d9480274d6545de508c7.jpeg

 

...looks like both gracile and robust forms of Collignoniceras woollgari. Nice find.

Man you must know your ammonites! I’m impressed. Someone told me that Collignoniceras woollgari was something of an index fossil for the Kamp Ranch, but I didn’t ID any of these impressions yet. Thanks for the ID.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
caldigger

Must be nice to have places close by that don't require hours behind the wheel to get to. You take very nice photographs by the way.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Fruitbat

It WAS a fun trip even though I didn't bring anything home.  KimTexan is a wonderful fossiling companion and her endurance (as evidenced by some of her other posts here on TFF) is incredible. I'm definitely getting too old to keep up with a youngster like her! (:D)

 

That Chinese Privet is absolutely impossible to penetrate with anything short of a very large bulldozer or a very small thermonuclear device.  Trying to use a machete to hack your way through it would be a workout worthy of a person in training for a marathon!  The killdeer (a form of plover) was entertaining.  I've seen them do their 'broken wing' act before and this little girl was persistent but she quickly switched over to the defense when I got too close to her eggs.  She let me approach to within a meter of her 'nest' and still showed no inclination to get out of my way.  No mother lion ever defended her cubs more bravely.

 

Anyway...it was a fun if relatively unproductive day.  I'm looking forward to my next chance to spend some time fossil-hunting with KimTexan.

 

-Joe

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Fruitbat

Oh, by the way, I think those pretty little 'I don't know what these are' flowers are a form of native wild geranium.

 

-Joe

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
KimTexan
1 hour ago, bone2stone said:

The prioniclonus (Prionitropis) should prep nicely but that Camp Ranch matrix is some unforgiving stuff.

Best use some professional advice or have it prepped for you.

An airscribe is the best tool for the job.

An electric scribe won't give you the results you need. You would destroy several scribes and still not get it done well.

Even with an air scribe it would need further prep with abrasive air.

The deposit you guys were in has yielded a lot of "pearls" over the years.

Often found in these conglomerates and associated with Inoceramus remains.

That area sounds like a couple of areas I frequent.

 

Jess B

 

BTW, that material is where my wife found the "first found" Dallas County Texas regular echinoids known. (Phymasoma)

So, which is the prioniclonus? I have no clue. I don’t know what a Collignoniceras woollgari looks like either or the gracile either. However I do have a Texas ammonite reference book now, which should help with that.

 

Thanks for the prep info. I have no idea how much it would cost me to have it prepped out.

I doubt I can afford it at this point anyway. I’m going through a very ugly, costly and lengthy divorce and custody battle. I’ve been married to a narcissist for 20 years. I’m ready for peace.

That is one big reason why I fossil hunt so often. To find some peace and solace in nature and to keep my mind off of all the ugly stuff going on. I’m a peaceful, caring person. I desire peace for my husband too, but some people know how to find peace and live in it better than others.

 

Is it the Kamp Ranch that produces yields pearls and Phymasoma?   I’m intrigued by the formation after finding that ammonite impression plate and also reading about the variety of ammonites found in the Eagle Ford.

Do you know where more exposures of the Kamp are in the area? There were scattered fragments of it where I found this stuff, but that was it. Does it usually present in fragments or are there solid exposures?

 

@caldigger Thank you. I have liked photography since I was a child. When I was in college I was a photographer for the university newspaper and advancement department. I was also the photography editor of the yearbook one year before becoming the editor my last year there. Unfortunately all I have is my iPhone for a camera, but it takes pretty good pics. However it’s nothing like a professional camera. My baby brother (all grown up now) was a wedding photographer for a number of years. I loved his cameras. I had/have camera envy ever since.

 

@Fruitbat That is very kind of you to say. I laugh at the endurance part though. You haven’t seen me dragging my worn out tail back to my car at times. I remember reading @believerjoe‘s story of finding to mosasaur at the NSR. I think it went something like he got back to his truck and sat there in the rain leaning against the tire of his truck trying to recover. I have felt much like that a few times. I do push myself very hard. I get back to my car at times and just sit there for a few minutes so worn out I can hardly move. I’d never push anyone else that hard. I think for me it is testing my capacity and limits. You’d think I’d be very stiff and sore the next day, but I have found a cure for it and I’m rarely ever stiff and sore the next day.

One time I remember trying to hammer out an ammonite for close to 2 hours out of the Duck Creek Formation in Ft. Worth, I think I told the story on here. My arms felt like limp noodles. I could hardly hold them up to hold the steering wheel to drive home.

 

You may be right about the flower. I think it may be a form of stork’s bill, but I didn’t find any stork’s bill exactly like it. I still have my best wildflower reference book packed in a box. It wasn’t in my smaller reference book. I’m pretty sure it would be in there.

 

@Tidgy's Dad Thank you. I’m glad you liked them. I’ll post some blue bonnets right after this.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
KimTexan

This is the infamous Texas bluebonnet. I like the composition on this shot with 3 of them staggered one behind the other, but it was quite accidental. I was only taking a pic of the one.

48F107D0-38D4-4C5F-A14B-33A70985F9BE.jpeg.0540a3aa33b76ecf553287aa2a3a7ab7.jpeg

I took these pics on my way home this evening after my 10.5 hour jury duty ordeal. So it was getting dark. I didn’t have to lighten or edit this pic at all. They were just that beautiful blue, white and kind of red. Our state flag colors.

 

This flower has to be a close runner up to the Texas Thistle as my favorite. However, it holds a much dearer place in my heart. It is the state flower of Texas. Texans are a bit crazy about their bluebonnets. It seems to almost hold the status of the state flag or something with some people. It is something some Texans defend with fierceness. It garners a lot of devotion. It’s hard to describe or rationalize why some of us have such a devotion and sense of loyalty to a flower, but that’s how it is.

I even designed a cookbook cover once and created my own font out of bluebonnets for the book cover lettering.

33FD93B0-AE66-4456-91E4-9FF4A2B14D43.jpeg.34d45a44997b0b5ee19ba71f069089d1.jpeg

These flowers often cover huge fields. It is a breathtaking and awesome sight to behold one of those fields. This is just a little patch.

F9CD662E-35E8-4477-8E4D-6447E5E8BB2A.jpeg.6f41998581020689d7854953bf509044.jpeg

This is my daughter, Gigi (short for Gisselle) sitting in the middle of the patch. She’s 13. She is in honors math and English this year. She’s also the yearbook editor of her middle school yearbook for about 1500 kids this year. I’m a proud mom. 

03087A8F-DD2F-42B5-A33C-CBA5A4B5ABD9.jpeg.17b07b349eba282d42770b24d3ada4de.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tidgy's Dad

Well done to you and Gigi. :)

And those flowers are so beautiful..............:wub:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DPS Ammonite

Nice Collignoniceras woollgari; clean them don't prep them. They go by several names: http://fossilworks.org/bridge.pl?a=taxonInfo&taxon_no=144342  Look at "alternate  combinations."

 

Two forms based on sex; a larger "robust" form and a smaller "gracile" form. I am not sure what form is male; they are not always the larger sex.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ynot

Sounds like a good trip even with the lack of fossils found.

I think what You did find was worth the efforts.

Thanks for sharing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Malone

Very nice adventure! Your writings are a pleasure to read! The plants are very cool. The concretions are as well. Sounds like you had a good companion with interesting knowledge of avian behavior. I have never experienced the broken wing diversion, but have experienced diversion behavior from birds. Beautiful bird, and brave. The first concretion looks like it was already cracked. It would be interesting to see what was inside. Ever since I broke open my first geod I have been interested in concretions. Thank you for sharing your adventures they are nice to vicariously experience!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
bone2stone
5 hours ago, DPS Ammonite said:

Nice Collignoniceras woollgari; clean them don't prep them. They go by several names: http://fossilworks.org/bridge.pl?a=taxonInfo&taxon_no=144342  Look at "alternate  combinations."

 

Two forms based on sex; a larger "robust" form and a smaller "gracile" form. I am not sure what form is male; they are not always the larger sex.

 

 

 

Kim,

Cleaning will only go so far, sacrificing a few of the lesser quality impressions and "working around them" there is a slim possibility of intact specimens internally.

But then....the "Camp Ranch" as I stated earlier is not very forgiving. I have found very few good specimens embedded in that material. High activity material when freshly deposited.

Most nice specimens, I have found, were found free of matrix some with the pearlescent exterior preserved.

Call it  and do with it what you wish, it is yours to do as you want.

 

If you were to take "Beltline South" to the area near Joe Pool lake there are still a few exposures all around the housing

area to the East after passing Camp Wisdom road in South Grand Prairie. [Also west of the Cedar Hill area]

I operated heavy equipment there years ago opening up vast areas of the (Eagleford) Camp Ranch, Arcadia Park etc and even took Dallas Paleo group there in the 80's to show them area where I found my avocado seed sized pearl! One member found one the size of the tip of your thumb still stuck to the inoceramus shell!

Fun and games while it lasted',  built up quite a collection of specimens from there. Housing pads and first cut road bed cuts. (Lots of ammonites, crabs and shark teeth)

Examine the stone under magnification and look for partial echinoids and what may look like small light brown seeds,  (Not all of the pearls I have found are round) 

Also, Kim it is so refreshing to read most of your posts. Not many take the time to smell the roses as you go through the motions of fossil finding.

The Blue Bonnets (Lupine) you posted it is a shame they do not last a little longer. 

I think the cacti "prickly pear" produce some extraordinarily photogenic pics as well but they are not in bloom just yet.
[Did not mention it before but the birdy is an outstanding example of motherhood, willing to stand her ground against overwhelmingly outsized "Monster" looking at her.]

Thanks again for taking us out with you. My days of exploring are fewer and fewer all the time.

 

(I feel for you and your little girl, issues of separation from your ex. not an easy thing to go through. My  own issues disappeared after divorce 40+ years ago)

 

Jess B.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
gwestbrook
On 4/10/2018 at 6:00 PM, KimTexan said:

I am doing the jury duty thing today so I have a lot of time on my hands to make a trip report post.

This post isn’t rich in fossils despite visiting 3 different sites. It was something of a strike out for the day, with the exception of 2 pieces from the 3rd place we stopped at. One of the pieces was a true keeper for me though..

Wow! I especially like the ammonites! Those nodules with the calcite crystals look just like the stuff that I've found at the plant over in Midlothian. Good report! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
KimTexan
On 4/10/2018 at 11:22 PM, DPS Ammonite said:

Nice Collignoniceras woollgari; clean them don't prep them. They go by several names: http://fossilworks.org/bridge.pl?a=taxonInfo&taxon_no=144342  Look at "alternate  combinations."

They are impressions, not the actual ammonite. I believe that may go for the whole plate, but there could be some ammonites in the matrix.

 

@PFOOLEY thank you for the ID help. Nice example.

 

@bone2stone Thank you for more insight on prep. Also, thank you very much for the formation site exposure info!! At least I know where to look now.

Thank you for the compliments on my posts and pics.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Nimravis

Kim as always, Great Trip Report and pics. Really love the flowers and the ammonite plate and especially the nice piece the @Fruitbat , Joe, gave you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Malone
21 hours ago, PFOOLEY said:

Here is a specimen of Collignoniceras woollgari impressions from Sandoval County, NM...

c.woolgari3.thumb.jpg.dfe802d45aeefc96373e9f1b1efb8084.jpg     ...this is the robust...  c.woollgari.thumb.jpg.d5f6db87c0ad713d937152188da02aed.jpg   ...and this is the gracile...    c.woollgari2.thumb.jpg.5e5a354d7b631bc6a4e2ae260372329d.jpg

 

...and this is must have literature...

A REVISION OF THE TURONIAN MEMBERS OF THE AMMONITE SUBFAMILY COLLIGNONICERATINAE FROM THE UNITED STATES WESTERN INTERIOR AND GULF COAST

... :).

Beautiful impressions!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
MeargleSchmeargl

Even though you didn't find much, the scenery alone must have made one heck of a trip! photos bring it to life. Great job! :dinothumb:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×