Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Jazfossilator

Found this on myrtle beach this morning after heavy thunderstorms threw large debris all around the beach, I'm not sure what this is? It's attached to a large concretion.IMG_1993.thumb.JPG.e6ba3b9fc45bef8772fd9af2de2d5c79.JPGIMG_2009.thumb.JPG.ad625136d78b6e439fd40cdf5ae7227a.JPGIMG_2010.thumb.JPG.752f917854945fcdb066d29eea6dce0f.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
indominus rex

It seems like a piece of sponge or coral that got washed up, doesn't look fossilized though.

Regards, indominus rex.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
MeargleSchmeargl

I'm not the guy to ask, but first idea is either a Bryozoan or a weathered coral.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Plax

gray rock on specimen would seem to indicate that this bryozoan colony is fossil

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
thelivingdead531

I was thinking coral as well, but I’m far from an expert. 

 

@indominus rex What makes you say it doesn’t look fossilized? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Rockwood

Definitely looks bryozoan to me, and as I remember most of the sand there doesn't have much staining potential. 

Was this not the case where it was found ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Rockwood
57 minutes ago, thelivingdead531 said:

I was thinking coral as well, but I’m far from an expert. 

The reason it resembles coral could easily be that this was a symbiotic relationship between a worm like animal and a bryozoan.

I have some modern examples collected in Sandy Hook Bay NJ.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
sixgill pete

Definitely a Byrozoan colony. I would also say it is fossilized.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Herb

I am on the bryozoan side also

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
thelivingdead531

Ah yes, I can see it now. Thank you for sharing @Rockwood!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
abyssunder

The specimen in question nicely resembles the 'coral sponge' from here:)

 

IMG_1993.JPG.850c9575c31de779ddedb0fa0a260392.thumb.JPG.f92dc396683705777ad721c5218a4b5d.JPGhpim3354_edited-1.thumb.jpg.74efe6ed38e4c73c12deeb717f2302e4.jpg

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Rockwood
21 minutes ago, abyssunder said:

nicely resembles

Sorry but it looks a bit too thick to be a good match to me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jazfossilator

Very interesting, I hadn't the slightest clue other than maybe coral, I believe you are right about both the identity and the worm holes @Rockwood thanks to everyone who answered! I have some research to do:)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
abyssunder
2 hours ago, Rockwood said:

Sorry but it looks a bit too thick to be a good match to me.

That's not a problem. Try to compare the inside and outside patterns and the general shape of the specimens. I'm leaning toward sponge vs bryozoan.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jazfossilator
8 minutes ago, abyssunder said:

That's not a problem. Try to compare the inside and outside patterns and the general shape of the specimens. I'm leaning toward sponge vs bryozoan.

I'm curious are aquatic worms found in sponges too? Upon closer inspection this thing has quite a few tube like worms IMG_2075.thumb.JPG.9efa5d9183459637295f01b87d434afb.JPGIMG_2072.thumb.JPG.6e53836a9cbca3245d3005b5e5048625.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tidgy's Dad

Yes, that looks like a colony of worm tubes covered in sediment 

Can't see sponges or bryozoa there 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Rockwood
8 hours ago, abyssunder said:

That's not a problem.

How can that not be a problem ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Rockwood
1 hour ago, Tidgy's Dad said:

 worm tubes covered in sediment 

What kind of sediment looks like that ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
abyssunder
10 hours ago, Jazfossilator said:

I'm curious are aquatic worms found in sponges too? Upon closer inspection this thing has quite a few tube like worms 

Those little hollow tubes are worm tubes of tube worms which can attack sponges, corals, gastropods, bivalves, etc.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Al Dente

I agree with everyone who says this is a bryozoan colony. On several of the photos you can see the individual zooids.

 

 

bryo.JPG

bryo2.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Rockwood

I'm a little over my head here so throw me a line if I go under.

Could some of the confusion be caused by the fact that all zooid like structures do not necessarily house feeding zooids.

Might this colony have employed an unusual number due to the presence of the tubes ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
abyssunder

Maybe Plocoscyphia looks more close to the specimen in question.

 

IMG_1993.JPG.850c9575c31de779ddedb0fa0a260392.thumb.JPG.b01df061bc357551538722ce3ab4be91.JPG136370730491612-big.thumb.jpg.93222faecc78de6c033eb0263ebb6e7e.jpgoberkreide_-_campan_maastricht__20160814_1374342837.jpg.99d99d8b12080bb25af631cb5d2d5153.jpg

 

pictures from here and here

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×