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Peat Burns

Species List Paulding Fossil Gardens

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dalmayshun

What a good job. I have only been there once, but plan to go back. I did find two large brachipods that I'm trying to identify...doing it just from the way they look can be tricky, so this list will certainly help me. If you wouldn't mind giving me your expertise, I'll post them there, piggybacking your wonderful post. 

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Peat Burns
6 hours ago, dalmayshun said:

What a good job. I have only been there once, but plan to go back. I did find two large brachipods that I'm trying to identify...doing it just from the way they look can be tricky, so this list will certainly help me. If you wouldn't mind giving me your expertise, I'll post them there, piggybacking your wonderful post. 

Thanks.  Your first one looks like Orthospirifer cooperi.  There's no scale, but you said "large", so I'm guessing it's 3 inches or so.  One of the characteristics of this taxon is fine striations (capillae) in the fold and sulcus (parallel with the plications).  You need a strong hand lens to see these.  But the big spirifers  at that site are all O. cooperi. Finding intact ones like yours is somewhat difficult.  The shells are fragile.

 

Your second one, I believe, is a deformed Megastrophia concava. It appears to have been unusually compressed between the hinge and commissure.  I've found similar ones.

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Peat Burns

May 3, 2018:  Add Botryllopora socialis to the list under Phylum Ectoprocta 

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Tcat3rd

I find this list helpful. Thanks for your diligence!

 

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Peat Burns

@Tcat3rd Thanks!  I'm glad it is helpful.  I'll keep adding to the list when I find / identify additional species.:)

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Peat Burns

Add the trilobite Pseudodechenella lucasensis (I found this on June 8, 2018):

 

20180709_220613.jpg.3f6081ad650e707bb2a834089bb3a20c.jpg

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Peat Burns

Add Mytilarca cordata (bivalvia)

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ClearLake

This is a great list, I cant believe I didn't see this earlier in the year when I was working through my Paulding material.  Now I have a second batch I am going through and I'll see how it compares to your list.  Are you looking to compile what others may have found also?  If so, Ill put up a short list of what I have that is additional to yours.  I found my first ever Rostroconch when I was there last time.

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Peat Burns
On 10/7/2018 at 8:08 PM, ClearLake said:

This is a great list, I cant believe I didn't see this earlier in the year when I was working through my Paulding material.  Now I have a second batch I am going through and I'll see how it compares to your list.  Are you looking to compile what others may have found also?  If so, Ill put up a short list of what I have that is additional to yours.  I found my first ever Rostroconch when I was there last time.

Sorry I missed this.  Feel free to add to this thread, preferably with a photo for verification.  Would love to have a picture of the rostroconch from Paulding in this thread!

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ClearLake

Here are some pictures of the rostroconch from Paulding.  The squares on the scale pad are 5mm on a side.  The overall specimen is ~3cm long and ~3.5cm wide (unfortunately, it is not complete).  I have identified this as Hippocardia cunea based on ODR Bulletin 70, Fossils of Ohio (1996) but I recognize it does not look exactly like the illustration in the book and could be a different species with further research.  Too bad my former thesis adviser is no longer alive, he wrote the chapter and could have ID'd it in a flash I'm sure!  I believe this is the only rostroconch I have in my collection so I'm not real familiar with them.

 

I have about a half dozen other species (brachiopods and bryozoans primarily) which are not on your list, I am going to re-look at the ID's then I'll put some pictures of those on here too.

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ClearLake

@Peat Burns  Here are a few pictures (again, the squares are 5mm on a side) of a brachiopod that is not on your list, but is a bit tricky to ID in my opinion.  You may have some like it under your Petrocrania and maybe that is the correct ID.  I am calling this Orbiculoidea doria based on Kesling/Chilman but maybe more importantly on Hoare and Stellars 1969 work on Inarticulate brachiopods of the Silica.  This and Petrocrania look very similar to me, but size, the more posterior position of the beak, and the relatively coarse growth lines lead me to Orbiculoidea.  Another interesting factor is that in the paper they state that Petrocrania is usually found attached to other brachiopods (or other items), Orbiculoidea is usually found as isolated valves within the matrix.  The third picture is one I had labeled as Orbiculoidea, but would now be inclined to call Petrocrania (sorry for the rather poor picture of that, it is on another brachiopod and is only about 2mm across).  What do you think?

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ClearLake

Here is what I believe is a Philhedra stewarti based on the costae not going up onto the beak.  I suppose its possible that could be a result of wear, but I don't think so based on looking at it under the microscope (I know the picture is marginal).

IMG_5069.jpg

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ClearLake

And my last brachiopod that was not on your list is Tropidoleptus carinatus.  I have a couple of them but this one has the best preservation.  As you can see, length is about 9 mm and width is about 12.5 mm.

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Peat Burns
On 4/17/2019 at 2:52 PM, ClearLake said:

I am calling this Orbiculoidea

Agreed.  I just prepped one of these from the Silica Fm. of Michigan (Washtenaw Co.).  It was also unattached.

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Peat Burns
On 4/17/2019 at 7:21 PM, ClearLake said:

And my last brachiopod that was not on your list is Tropidoleptus carinatus.

Looks good!  I'm hoping I have some of these in my pile of brachs that need cleaned and sorted.  I'd be surprised if there weren't several additional species of Strophodonta, too.  I need to "sit down" with my pile of them and work through them. 

 

I'm pretty sure I have two species of Tentaculites

 

I know I have several different species of ostracods.  I just need to find time to work on them. 

 

Love that rostroconch. I don't have one of those on my life list, let alone Paulding...

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ClearLake
On 4/19/2019 at 12:11 AM, Peat Burns said:

Looks good!  I'm hoping I have some of these in my pile of brachs that need cleaned and sorted.  I'd be surprised if there weren't several additional species of Strophodonta, too.  I need to "sit down" with my pile of them and work through them. 

 

I'm pretty sure I have two species of Tentaculites

 

I know I have several different species of ostracods.  I just need to find time to work on them. 

 

Love that rostroconch. I don't have one of those on my life list, let alone Paulding...

That Tropidoleptus is not very large, so they are easy to overlook.  

 

I also have not tried too hard just yet to wade through the pile of Strophodonta and get too precise on ID's, I find the literature and various descriptions that I have read so far a bit confusing, so that will take some more research.

 

Interesting on the Tentaculites, I'll be interested to see what you find.

 

The ostracods are very nice looking, and I think I have a decent publication for identifying them, just haven't done it yet either.

 

I still have a bucket of matrix that I pull a piece out of every now and then to see what new stuff I can  find in it.  I hope to be back up that way in a month or so and have a chance to get over to Paulding again to pick up some more material.

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Peat Burns

Add:

 

Phylum Echinodermata

Class Blastoidea

 

Hyperoblastus reimanni :megdance:

20190506_090253.thumb.jpg.6fda07a395ec44629af514fda146eb24.jpg

Scale in mm

 

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ClearLake

Very nice. Don’t think I’ve ever seen a blastoid out of any Devonian material I’ve collected. 

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Peat Burns
1 minute ago, ClearLake said:

Very nice. Don’t think I’ve ever seen a blastoid out of any Devonian material I’ve collected. 

Thanks.  I about fell over when I saw it.  Definitely much, much harder to come by than in the Mississippian :)

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minnbuckeye

Special find!!

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Tidgy's Dad

Tony, that blastoid is incredible! 

Yum Yum! :envy:

Great find. 

I have recently acquired some Silica shale fossils and have a few questions for you if you don't mind. 

Excuse my ignorance. 

I have a lovely pyritized Paraspirifer bownockeri from the Lower Silica Fm. Sylvania, Lucas County, N.W. Ohio. This is not on your list. Am I correct in assuming the id is probably valid but this species just doesn't appear in the Paulding Community? (pun intended). 

Likewise, Mediospirifer audaculus? 

And the trilobite Eldredgeops milleri? 

I have Hederella filiformis listed as a species from the Silica Shale. Would that be of help? 

And I seem to have a bryozoan that could be Atactoporella typicus. Or not. 

I haven't posted pictures as I don't want to spoil your thread with pictures of beasties that I've got the id wrong or don't appear at Spaulding. 

Thanks,

Adam.

:fistbump:

 

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ClearLake
3 hours ago, Tidgy's Dad said:

I have a lovely pyritized Paraspirifer bownockeri from the Lower Silica Fm. Sylvania, Lucas County, N.W. Ohio. This is not on your list. Am I correct in assuming the id is probably valid but this species just doesn't appear in the Paulding Community? (pun intended). 

I believe you are correct.  I also have some from the Silica Fm in Lucas Co, but none from Paulding (yet, at least)

3 hours ago, Tidgy's Dad said:

 

3 hours ago, Tidgy's Dad said:

And the trilobite Eldredgeops milleri? 

Yes, I believe both subspecies E rana crassiturberculata and E rana milleri are found at Paulding, at least I believe I have examples of both.

3 hours ago, Tidgy's Dad said:

I have Hederella filiformis listed as a species from the Silica Shale. Would that be of help?

I also have a Hederella from Paulding, but I am always so uncertain of my bryozoan ID's that I seldom like to put that in print :sick:

 

Tony can of course correct any blunders I may have made

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Peat Burns
14 hours ago, Tidgy's Dad said:

Tony, that blastoid is incredible! 

Yum Yum! :envy:

Great find. 

I have recently acquired some Silica shale fossils and have a few questions for you if you don't mind. 

Excuse my ignorance. 

I have a lovely pyritized Paraspirifer bownockeri from the Lower Silica Fm. Sylvania, Lucas County, N.W. Ohio. This is not on your list. Am I correct in assuming the id is probably valid but this species just doesn't appear in the Paulding Community? (pun intended). 

Likewise, Mediospirifer audaculus? 

And the trilobite Eldredgeops milleri? 

I have Hederella filiformis listed as a species from the Silica Shale. Would that be of help? 

And I seem to have a bryozoan that could be Atactoporella typicus. Or not. 

I haven't posted pictures as I don't want to spoil your thread with pictures of beasties that I've got the id wrong or don't appear at Spaulding. 

Thanks,

Adam.

:fistbump:

 

Thanks, Adam.

 

I started this list exclusively for the Paulding site because it is a public fossil park and there may be people, including local teachers / educators, interested in knowing what has been found there, specifically. So it is not inclusive of the Silica Formation as a whole. There appears to be some lateral variation in the presence, abundance, and even average size of species in the Silica. Although Paraspirifer bownockeri are beautifully preserved and abundant at the Sylvania site, I have never found them at Paulding.  It may just be a matter of where the spoils originate in the quarry, or it could just be altogether rare or absent there.  Similarly, the Milan site in Michigan lacks great abundance of P. bownockeri, although I think it has been reported there. 

 

It seems that there is similar lateral variation in the presence / abundance of calyces of the crinoid Arthroacantha carpenteri.  It was not uncommon to find them at Sylvania (when one could still get permission to collect there), but I have yet to find one at Paulding (and by now, I have accumulated more search time at Paulding than I ever had at Sylvania).

 

I haven't confirmed Mediospirifer audaculus at Paulding yet, but I have a whole drawer of material, including many larger Spiriferids, that need to be examined yet.

 

Hederella is very common at Paulding, but I have avoided putting species names (or in many cases genus names) on the bryozoans, because I haven't tried to tackle that phylum to any degree yet.  I have it in my mind that, with the exception of a few where external morphology is diagnostic, microscopic analysis of internal anatomy is required for positive identification.  Hederella may be one of the exceptions, but I've been avoiding putting names on bryozoans altogether (in all time periods) until I have time someday to study them more closely and comprehensively.  I've been collecting them, but saving their identification for a much, much later date.  I have many, many lots of bryozoans, especially from the Cincinnatian, that are simply labeled "unidentified ectoprocta" (followed by location and geologic context info, of course :)).

 

On another note, I should be able to put some species names on the Tentaculites soon as well as add some ostracods.

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Peat Burns

Photo of the Botryllopora socialis (ectoprocta)

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