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gregmolrocks

Mind Blown

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gregmolrocks

Hello,

 

I am reluctant to post this because of the flame I might get. I don't know how else to interpret this "rock". I can't believe it left as much detail as to even have the pink spot at the end of the trunk.

 

Where should I go from here?

 

elephant1.png

elephant3.png

elephant4.png

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DevonianDigger

You won't get flamed here, don't worry. The community is about educating people, not ridiculing them or passing judgement on people's finds and interpretations.

 

That being said, I am a little confused as to what you're seeing. What "trunk" are you referring to? What are you thinking this is?

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gregmolrocks

An elephant trunk. At the end of the trunk is a pink don't with to air holes. I believe it is a cast fossil of an elephant skull with it's trunk circled around the mouth.

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-AnThOnY-

Someplace you can start is Google, as a preliminary check since you think this piece includes an elephant trunk, google search "fossil elephant trunk".

 

In this case you will see that there aren't any. Elephant (mammoth, mastodon etc...) don't preserve anything along those lines unless preserved in permafrost.

 

The rock does have an interesting composition that looks like it would have fossils in it, maybe shells etc...

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sseth

Welcome to the forum.  We are happy to have you as part of our community.  In looking at your post I am not able to identify it as a fossil, but perhaps just a suggestive geologic formation.  Thanks again for posting.

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gregmolrocks

How could they pink dot next to the two air holes be there by chance?

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gregmolrocks

Does anyone know a good lab that I could send a sample? I am very confident about this.

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Raggedy Man

I agree with my fellow colleagues on this one. Not a fossil. But I do appreciate your enthusiasm and willingness to learn about what you have found. 

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Rockwood
1 minute ago, gregmolrocks said:

How could they pink dot next to the two air holes be there by chance?

Count all the holes and dots you can see in all the rocks you can find. Large numbers tend to make long odds quite easily overcome.

Here is a shot from a quarry in South Dakota for an example of the sort of contrast one sees in an exposed fossil.

IMG_3135a.jpg

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Kane

You have once again neglected to answer the location of where this was found. If you read our pinned topics in the Fossil ID thread, you will note that providing location is a basic requirement if your goal is to have your find properly identified (which I assume is your goal). The purpose of stating where it was found is to determine its geologic context so as to rule out particular fossils or rock types that are native to specific formations. 

 

There are no air holes in this piece, any more than a hole in a tree or a brick is an air hole. 

 

You are asserting your belief, but science is not about belief. 

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Fossildude19

I don't see anything that looks like this:

 

470935043.jpg   close-up-of-the-nostril-holes-on-the-tip-of-an-african-elephant-trunk-B2ENEG.jpg   elephants-trunk-300 (1).jpg  nariz-elefante.jpg

 

 

in this:

 

elephant4.png.5f8e60798c8e494b9b35a7b04e61f08d.png  :unsure: :headscratch:

 

Not exactly a match, would you agree, Greg? :) 

 

elephant4.png-vert.jpg

 

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Paciphacops

I once saw the late Carl Sagan speak many years ago. He was being hounded by a couple of guys about the face on Mars. His response was "There is an eggplant that looks exactly like former President Richard Nixon". 

 

Sometimes a rock will resemble a fossil by chance, but in this case, I just don't see anything. If this rock is from Georgia, it would not be basalt. However, the small voids (from gas bubbles?), do make it look like basalt.

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Fossildude19

Since the OP refuses to answer the most basic of questions, we will lock this thread until more information is given. 

Seeing faces in the clouds is fun, but hardly scientific. ;) 

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