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The Amateur Paleontologist

Heteromorph: The rarest fossil ammonites (Nature at its most bizarre)

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fossisle

It is indeed a fascinating subject and a wonderful book

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WhodamanHD

I’ll look into getting it, I have one heteromorph (thanks @David in Japan!) and I treasure it!

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WhodamanHD
14 hours ago, David in Japan said:

I will send you more (and In a better conservation shape) in September.

Thank you! That is very kind! I’ll see to gathering some Maryland fossils for you in return!

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Wrangellian

Sounds like an interesting book, one that I should get, being a resident of one of those heteromorph source areas. I will get one if I can find a copy that I can afford (the prices are all pretty stupid on amazon right now).

At one of the B.C. Paleo Symposiums that I attended some years ago here on the Island, I was made aware that there were people who had come up from the US just to see our heteromorphs - I guess that's all they collected/studied. I was surprised that someone would come all that way just for that, but I can understand it now. Maybe I didn't realize at the time that were were relatively a heteromorph haven! (but I think one of many - Japan being another)

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David in Japan

just to inform you that I started to opst the pictures I took few month ago at the Museum when a fossil collector from Hokkaido came.

 

 

 

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siteseer
On May 17, 2018 at 11:24 PM, Wrangellian said:

Sounds like an interesting book, one that I should get, being a resident of one of those heteromorph source areas. I will get one if I can find a copy that I can afford (the prices are all pretty stupid on amazon right now).

At one of the B.C. Paleo Symposiums that I attended some years ago here on the Island, I was made aware that there were people who had come up from the US just to see our heteromorphs - I guess that's all they collected/studied. I was surprised that someone would come all that way just for that, but I can understand it now. Maybe I didn't realize at the time that were were relatively a heteromorph haven! (but I think one of many - Japan being another)

 

Hi Wrangellian,

 

There was a symposium in Japan some years ago and there was a field trip to an ammonite site.  One of my friends went there and on the field trip because heteromorphs are probably his favorite fossils to collect.  He made some fast friends among the locals because he didn't try to race ahead to find something on the surface before someone else.  He hung back and smoked cigarettes with who turned out to be the most experienced collectors of the area.  Fortunately, a friend was along to translate.  He was told that there was a chance of encountering a bear in the area and that he would have to run faster than they in that case.  He answered, "No, I just have to run faster than the slowest one of you."  When they got the translation, they all burst out laughing.

 

I saw a copy of that book not long after it was published.  It's beautiful.  I'll pick one up at some point.

 

Jess

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Wrangellian

Ha! That's an old joke over here, I guess they hadn't yet hear it in Japan.

Did he come home with any ammo's?

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siteseer
On 5/31/2018 at 5:30 PM, Wrangellian said:

Ha! That's an old joke over here, I guess they hadn't yet hear it in Japan.

Did he come home with any ammo's?

 

Yes, he did.  At least one was a gift from one of those guys.

 

He told me he saw some incredible specimens in private collections.  One collector also had a partial Ptychodus dentition from out there.

 

Jess

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The Amateur Paleontologist

@Wrangellian @David in Japan I'm well aware that the heteromorphs from British Columbia and Japan are really cool, but France has its own fair share of neat heteromorphs. Would you guys like to see some?

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David in Japan

Je ne te contredirai pas.

 

It would be a pleasure to see some pictures.

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The Amateur Paleontologist

A few from my personal collection (WARNING: not many :()

 

Fairly long fragment of a thin (uncommon form) Hamites sp. from the Late Cretaceous of Cap Blanc-Nez (Pas-de-Calais, France)

 5b12a37f059ed_ScreenShot2018-06-02at16_01_09.png.293764cefaf7e159dd6838f2521eb926.png

 

Slightly eroded Rossalites vocontianum from the Late Cretaceous of Drôme (France)

5b12a40898a37_ScreenShot2018-06-02at16_02_07.png.61ea4a747768acd9e2ed7a3177c71313.png

 

Rather well preserved (except for the inner whorls) Crioceratites duvalii from the Late Cretaceous of the Alpes de Haute-Provence (France)

5b12a494386b5_ScreenShot2018-06-02at16_01_42.png.159b9d44e3cde861c8c44cc146c23b65.png

 

The rest of what I have in terms of French heteromorphs aren't really worth showing (i.e. small fragments of common Hamites...) - hope you liked these anyway

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Wrangellian

Those would be wonderful additions to any collection, thanks for showing.

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David in Japan

Really nice! Is the hamiter pyritized?

Such big part is quite a rare piece.

 

When i lived in france (i am from dunkerque), i loved to go fossil hunting at the cap blanc-nez.

 

Thank you for the picture

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The Amateur Paleontologist

Yeah it is pyritized - glad you liked the heteromorphs :)

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KimTexan

I just stumbled upon this thread. I have not sat down and counted all the different heteromorphs genus or species that I have I guess it has to be at least 11 or 12 species. 2 of them are somewhat large,  4 are small, being less than 4 inches and then maybe 5 or so are close to micro, being about 1 cm and under. Sad to say the large ones are not complete, but they are still cool. The larger ones are Mariella brazoensis and Idohamites fremonti. 

I'll have to go find pictures of them. I have quite a few fragments of Idohamites fremonti,  but they are all incomplete. I found a location where them seem to be present in abundance, but have not come close to finding a complete one. Two of them are quite large for the species though. I think I have at least one other Idohamites, but I believe it to be another species. I have not taken the time to identify it.

This is a pic of a little Mariella. I have not identified the species yet though. The quality here in Texas is usually kind of poor. Most all of them are casts.

IMG_E3496.thumb.JPG.8f421620417919ce77bea6ca6dc20ce6.JPG

 

I think I counted once and I had identified at least 9 species of cephalopods on this hash plate. There are more on the other side too. It needs a lot more work to bring them all out. There is a baculite, Sciponoceras gracile present. There are also a couple species of Allocriceras present. I have quite a few of these hash plates with cephalopods in them. Most of the ammonites are heteromorphs.

IMG_7832.thumb.jpg.d0c4873deac1060016e92cdf612e514a.jpg

 

I'll try to find pics of my Mariella brazoensis and Idohamites fremonti and share them here.

 

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The Amateur Paleontologist

@KimTexan Wow... You got an entire block filled with heteromorphs?! I'm jealous now ;) No seriously speaking it's really nice and I'd love to see more Texan heteromorphs :)

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The Amateur Paleontologist

Wow! That's really cool! Are they yours?

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caterpillar

Yes

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The Amateur Paleontologist

Where did you find them? I'd be interested in checking out the site...

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KimTexan
On 7/31/2018 at 2:48 PM, The Amateur Paleontologist said:

@KimTexan Wow... You got an entire block filled with heteromorphs?! I'm jealous now ;) No seriously speaking it's really nice and I'd love to see more Texan heteromorphs :)

I’ll try to take pics tonight of some of them tonight after work.

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Wrangellian
9 hours ago, caterpillar said:

I like also heteromorphs. Here a very rare ammonite from southwest of France

Jouaniceras.jpg

Interesting... Never seen that one before! And it's the same age as my local collecting site (not that I should find all the same taxa that are found in other parts of the world).

It looks like a Glyptoxoceras that tightened its whorls until there was no space between them any more!  :P

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KimTexan

Ok here are a couple other species that I have.

This one is a Trachyscaphites springer springer. It is from the Cretaceous, Taylor group Ozan Formation in the North Sulfur River of Texas.  Most of the stuff you will see people post from there are vertebrates. 99% of what I find there are invertebrates, mostly cephalopods (ammonites and baculites) and petrified wood.

I am not good at prepping. I don’t have the patience for it. I’d rather be outside hunting any day. So where the brown mud is, most of that should be mostly nothing. The bottom of the whorl does not meet up with the previous whorl.

D58DCF55-0059-41E4-9B97-4F41A4908300.thumb.jpeg.692dd660c4e9828231acbf995035138f.jpeg

 

These are fragments of Idahomites freemonti I think that’s the spelling of the species, but I might be a letter or 2 off.

5ADA16A3-7D4A-4313-B73D-D689FB43286E.thumb.jpeg.c0319b43742ed52066b84b76776ad3da.jpeg

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