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So, I've recently been collecting sharks teeth at my local beach in North Carolina. Compared to teeth at most beaches I've hunted growing up, these are quite beat up. Out of the roughly 200 teeth from the past few weeks, I'd estimate that probably 75-90% of them are broken. Nearly every Great White tooth has been vertically fractured, usually cutting corners off of my precious babies. Is this just due to searching in the surf where the teeth are constantly being thrown around? I have been searching for teeth on similar beaches my whole life and have never seen such a high ratio of broken:whole teeth. Would be curious to hear everyone's input on why this might be. 

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Part of the reason could be how far they travel from point of origin,to the surf. The longer they are tossed around the more beat up they will be. Also would depend if they are reworked.

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Jazfossilator

I find a lot of broken teeth and various beat up stuff at Myrtle beach, Darktooth is right some of them have been beaten by many long years in the ocean. I also believe that some of the teeth are damaged by dredging.

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The originating strata are probably a ways away from that beach, and the teeth are thus 'well traveled'.

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WhodamanHD

Not nessecarily with yours but to cover some other methods of fracture:

At places with cliffs, the thirty foot fall can’t help. Teeth are more fragile than you’d think. They do seem to have certain weak planes of cleavage, like wood grain. Waves will beat them up easy and quick. Some where broken back in the day, with the bite force of these animals it’s not suprising some cracked after hitting bone or whatever those critters were chewing on. It would take pictures to determine which happened to yours. 

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Tidgy's Dad

Or a selachophobe is breaking all the teeth with a hammer. 

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Are they heavily worn, or just broken up?

If the latter, it might be a replenished beach, with offshore sand dredged and pumped through pipes.
That can tear them up.

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For those asking for pictures, here are a few. They seem to be all broken in almost the exact same way. image1.thumb.jpeg.3c91aded4250ddebf9718a034bfb5709.jpeg

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Also, I believe I am finding these teeth as a result of dredging. I hadn't thought about the teeth being pumped through pipes, that seems to make a lot of sense. 

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SailingAlongToo
15 minutes ago, tatehntr said:

Also, I believe I am finding these teeth as a result of dredging. I hadn't thought about the teeth being pumped through pipes, that seems to make a lot of sense. 

 

They also have to go through the pump impeller which has a specific size orifice,  defining pump size. All of your examples being broken in the same way and direction implies to an old sand miner like me, they were hit by the impeller flights.

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sixgill pete

@tatehntr which beach are you referring to. There are quite a few beaches in NC that produce shark teeth that are not broken, although they are almost always extremely worn. There are several beaches that have just completed dredge projects. 

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@sixgillpete Yes, I think it must be due to dredging. Wrightsville beach has been productive and they recently finished a beach restoration project. 

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