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Bobby Rico

That is stunning way to go @Herb. Adam I am really looking forward to this and learning a lot more. Just one thing add some tags to the post your probably get more views   :D

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Tidgy's Dad
Just now, Bobby Rico said:

That is stunning way to go @Herb. Adam I am really looking forward to this and learning a lot more. Just one thing add some tags to the post your probably get more views   :D

Good idea! 

Thanks, Bobby!:D

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Heteromorph

Nice coral! Can’t wait to see what is next. 

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Tidgy's Dad
Just now, piranha said:

text from:

 

Marr, J.E., & Nicholson, H.A. 1888

The Stockdale Shales.

Quarterly Journal of the Geological Society, 44:654-732

 

"The Coral-fauna of the Stockdale Series is a very limited one, as regards both the variety of species represented and the number of individuals.  The Upper Skelgll Beds have yielded an undeterminable species of Lindstroemia, and a Monticuliporoid has been found in the acuminatus-zone in Skelgill.  With these exceptions the known corals of the Stockdale Series are referable to the genus Favosites, and, mainly if not exclusively, to one species of the same, viz. F. mullochensis, Nicholson and Etheridge.  This species occurs abundantly in the Silurian rocks of Ayrshire, at Mulloch Hill and at Woodland Point; and it is of not very uncommon occurrence in the zone of Phacops glaber in Skelgill."

Brilliant, thank you! :)

The Stockdale Shales are now called the Stockdale Group which includes the Skelgill and Browgill formations, it seems. 

And F. mullochensis is now Palaeofavosites mullochensis (Nicholson and Etheridge, 1878) Solokov, 1951,  it would appear which means i wasn't far wrong! 

Thanks! 

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Tidgy's Dad
Just now, Troodon said:

Nice coral, interesting how much it looks like Hadrosaur skin. 

 

I second Bobby's comments on the Tags and can probably award you first place in the most ever tags :D

award_ribbon_175gold_1st_T.jpg.61c7a1ef7802ca15c5a8b992cbc11d32.jpg

Thanks, Frank, I like prizes! :D

Thing is I can't add to the tags after a day or two so i'm planning ahead. 

think I've got everything I listed, and more! 

I would like to award you a prize for linking absolutely everything to dinosaurs!;)

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Bobby Rico
8 hours ago, Tidgy's Dad said:

Thing is I can't add to the tags after a day or two so i'm planning ahead. 

You could do one more tag at the top saying “spoiler alert “  because we know what beautiful fossil are coming up. Can’t wait. :D Cheers Bobby

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TqB

A lovely little thing - I agree favositid rather than heliolitid (can't see any coenenchymal tubules) so @piranha's reference looks a good bet. 

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Tidgy's Dad
12 hours ago, Herb said:

that looks like a negative cast of a coral, maybe something like this coral. Imagine a cast of this Heliolites sp

 

 

Heliolites_sp.__Silurian-Wenlock__Visby-beds__Ireviken__Gotland__Sweden_3.jpg

Thanks Herb! It is indeed a negative cast. :)

I agree the corallites are a close match, but those in my specimen are much more tightly packed, I think. 

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thelivingdead531

:popcorn:

 

Can’t wait to see the rest of your collection!

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Bobby Rico

:popcorn::popcorn:

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piranha

A new inspiration: Tag Cloud mail?url=http%3A%2F%2Fmail.yimg.com%2Fok%2Fu%2Fassets%2Fimg%2Femoticons%2Femo76.gif&t=1526667423&ymreqid=2b37d289-e028-403a-1cad-3b0054018c00&sig=0pOO.2flzp.Y0u7bxd2k7g--~C :P

 

IMG1.png.7cb0581350624f6345f0b0062212743e.png

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Tidgy's Dad
On 5/17/2018 at 8:28 AM, Bobby Rico said:

You could do one more tag at the top saying “spoiler alert “  because we know what beautiful fossil are coming up. Can’t wait. :D Cheers Bobby

Spoiler alert has been added to the tags. :)

Seriously. 

Thanks for the suggestion, my friend! :1-SlapHands_zpsbb015b76:

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Tidgy's Dad
3 hours ago, piranha said:

A new inspiration: Tag Cloud mail?url=http%3A%2F%2Fmail.yimg.com%2Fok%2Fu%2Fassets%2Fimg%2Femoticons%2Femo76.gif&t=1526667423&ymreqid=2b37d289-e028-403a-1cad-3b0054018c00&sig=0pOO.2flzp.Y0u7bxd2k7g--~C :P

 

IMG1.png.7cb0581350624f6345f0b0062212743e.png

Goodness! 

How wonderful! :hearty-laugh:

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Tidgy's Dad

To all of you who are new to these threads, don't forget to check out 

 

which includes the Pre-Cambrian and 

Not as many tags added to these, but lots of wonderful specimens to look at. :D

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Tidgy's Dad

The Browgill Formation contains thin bands of shale which are said to contains lots of graptolites. 

Oddly I didn't find any but made up for it later in the day when searching in the Skelgill Formation in Skelghyll itself. 

But also in the Browgill i did find this brachiopod, Eostropheodonta mullochensis which firs rather nicely with my coral having the same specific name. The reason is that both species were named after Mulloch Hill in Ayrshire, as mentioned in Piranha's post above, and the same fauna seems also to occur in the Stockdale Group in Cumbria. 

The specimen is 2.3 cm at its widest. 

20180518_210758-1-1.thumb.jpg.d02f8d38c8561db0035d2b8ae1dfafa1.jpg

20180518_210836-1-1.thumb.jpg.905c5d3c9977e81316ead5fc5970e089.jpg

 

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Plantguy

Hey Adam, enjoyed the thread and the finds! Looking forward to the others as well. 

Regards, Chris 

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Tidgy's Dad
1 hour ago, Plantguy said:

Hey Adam, enjoyed the thread and the finds! Looking forward to the others as well. 

Regards, Chris 

Thank you, Chris! :)

After the Browgill Formation, I moved on to the actual Skelghyll Beck itself to check out the graptolite layers from the slightly older Skelgill Formation. Indeed the Browgill Formation rests conformably atop the Skelgill Fm; and right at the top of the Skelgill Fm in a thick band of very hard shale, I found this brachiopod, so it must be round about 436 million years old! 

It was in a huge lump of rock and i couldn't free it properly, perhaps I should have left it to be weathered free or destroyed. Not sure if what I did was right or wrong, but it was 30 years ago, so it's certainly a bit late to worry now. The stream in the beck was very cold but not very deep, I recall. The block I removed is 7 cm deep, not that you can tell by looking at the top in these photos. It's a huge piece and the brachiopod, which I believe to be the pentamerid Costistricklandia lirata is a whopper. The bit of brachiopod here is 6.8 cm at it's widest part, so the complete specimen must have been 8 cm at a guess. That's pretty big for a brachiopod. 

20180518_211028-1.thumb.jpg.e0ebe1c3b58aadb6a8c1065e7d976ca9.jpg20180518_210918-1-1.thumb.jpg.4162970c79a39f1b2faa1372ef927ac5.jpg

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Bobby Rico

Costistricklandia lirata is a beauty. Nice little report too. :D

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Tidgy's Dad
On 5/19/2018 at 7:40 AM, Bobby Rico said:

Costistricklandia lirata is a beauty. Nice little report too. :D

Thanks, Bobby. :)

I thought i'd take a break from the freezing cold streams of Northern England for a moment to post another brachiopod, this one from the Brassfield Formation of Centerville, Ohio. Some say that this should be its own formation, the Centerville Formation.  It was sent to me as Rhynchotrema by friends in the USA over 40 years ago as part of a fossil starter kit and labelled ' Rhynchotrema sp' . Don't think that's right. There are three species of Camarotoechia sp. found in these locations but that genus is very globose and this hasn't been flattened to that degree, at least. I think this is Rhynchotreta cf. thebesensis recorded from Centerville and much closer in my opinion. A different family to Rhynchotrema as well. Quite near the base of the Silurian, this one. 

It's tiny compared to Costistricklandia, only 8 mm long and 7 at its widest. 

 20180519_224014-1.thumb.jpg.b08eb67f7073d250d0c299ddc3f97382.jpg

20180519_223837-1.thumb.jpg.59fa7b7e5ae48a3be86774a183e8111e.jpg

20180518_211215-1-1.thumb.jpg.35613e92b01e8887943e0f2c94a9f607.jpg

 

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Tidgy's Dad

But wait a minute, thunk I, when I was gazing lovingly at this specimen yesterday. I've never tried to prep this little fellow. 

So out with the new pin-vice spiky thing  kindly sent to me by the wonderful @JohnBrewer

Here are the results :

20180520_215951-1.thumb.jpg.45509d0f3e90012b6029f79fb0e4c055.jpg

20180520_220022-1.thumb.jpg.c2035c437a299de7db66b796ad857fae.jpg

20180520_220223-1.thumb.jpg.5f4c34ebdccaaedc5c92e8e7946f65a3.jpg

20180520_220458-1.thumb.jpg.69130301dce677f92c541fe45fd518a2.jpg

Lovely! :wub:

@Peat Burns you may be interested in this and the previous few posts. :)

 

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piranha
1 hour ago, Tidgy's Dad said:

But wait a minute, thunk I, when I was gazing lovingly at this specimen yesterday. I've never tried to prep this little fellow. 

So out with the new pin-vice spiky thing  kindly sent to me by the wonderful @JohnBrewer

Here are the results :

20180520_215951-1.thumb.jpg.45509d0f3e90012b6029f79fb0e4c055.jpg

Lovely! :wub:

 

 

 

smiley.jpg.81dd8b093e52f7d74b2895aeba140ed2.jpg   bth_magican.gif

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