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Wrangellian

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I just finished reading this one. I do recommend it for the early-life nuts among us. It's chock full of eye candy, diagrams and info on everything Precambrian, not just Ediacaran though that is the focus, and into the Cambrian as well. State of the art as of 2007.. I'd like to see an updated edition if there ever is one.

There is an introductory section covering everything from the universe and the origin of Earth and of life, early macroscopic fossils, the Snowball Earth and so on, then gets into the meat of the different sites (major and minor) bearing Ediacaran fossils including some of the history of the sites' discovery, and of course the thinking around what the different critters are and how they evolved.

I particularly like the 'Atlas of Precambrian Metazoans' toward the back.

Sample pages:

 

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Nice review!  That looks like a great book!  I'm going to have to get a copy of that one!

 

-Joe

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Bobby Rico

That is a great book view thank you. I may also have too get a copy on payday.

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Fossildude19

Thanks for the great review, Eric! 

 

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Tidgy's Dad

Nice review, the pictures look super as well.:)

I would also be keen on a new version. 

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Wrangellian

Thanks guys. I'll be keeping an eye out for a new version - the authors made it clear that a lot of things were still up in the air and a lot of work ius yet to be done, and I wonder what has been changed or added to since then. I know for one that some of the Mistaken Point forms have been named (Fractofusus, for instance).

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Thanks for bringing this book to my attention. I just picked up a copy of it online.

 

Also spotted an additional review of this book from 2009 in the ZOOLOGICAL Journal of the Linnean Society:

 

https://academic.oup.com/zoolinnean/article/155/2/510/2596017

 

 

Cheers.

 

-Ken

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Wrangellian

Well what I wrote above is not a review compared to that - my purpose was only to bring it to the attention of Forum members! You can probably tell I'm a 'picture-is-worth-1000-words' guy and this book is loaded with pictures.

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Your photos got me to place an order for a used copy last night (can't wait till it's here). I spotted the online review while searching for options on where to pick up my copy and thought I'd add that to this post for completeness. Looks like a great book that will teach me some things about the initial diversification of the animal lineages. I've always been interested in the fascinating (and not well understood) "Cambrian Explosion" and the Ediacaran Period (which I believe was referred to as the "Precambrian" when I first learned about this time period). Tammy and I saw some really nice Ediacaran biota fossils when we visited the South Australian Museum in Adelaide--not very far from the Ediacara Hills in the Flinders Ranges which gave this geological period its name.

 

 

Cheers.

 

-Ken

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Wrangellian

Yes, they're finally dividing up the greater part of the Earth's history into periods like the Phanerozoic is, so we can stop referring to the Precambrian as if it's all one unit! It was always 'Late Precambrian' or 'Terminal Proterozoic' or the like when I first learned about it too. I saw many references to subdivisions but they were mostly not agreed upon or applicable internationally.

Now you don't need to make me jealous that you've been to Oz and seen them there, just because you can afford to travel!

Anyway it is a nice book, and good idea to find a used one (not cheap in all the places I look first).

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Nope. Not a cheap book--a "like new" used copy seemed the best choice to buy. From the price and size it looks like it may have been written as a textbook, or if not a textbook per se with study questions at the ends of the chapters, then at least an accompanying volume for a science class on evolution and diversification. Got the email notification that my copy is "in the mail" and can't wait till it gets here.

 

 

Cheers.

 

-Ken

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Wrangellian

There are no questions at the end of the chapters. It must have been meant for a wider audience given the appeal (I think).

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I've read through my share (and more) of textbooks that I've simply purchased to learn more about a topic (not for an actual class). I do rather prefer more general books so I don't have to skip over the built-in teaching materials at each chapter's end. I ordered my copy of this book 4 days ago but the seller hasn't provided shipping information so I can't track where it is at the moment. Hoping to see a heavy box appear at my door sometime soon. Can't wait to start reading through this book.

 

 

Cheers.

 

-Ken

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doushantuo

This may sound like a weird question,but does the book feature illustrations by Hans Pflug?

I hope everyone realize this is not a putdown of either the "promoting" or the buying (or even the contents) of this book,but given the frequency of apppearance of both GEOBIOLOGY and Precambrian Research....

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Wrangellian

Yes there are plates from Pflug, I almost took a pic of that page but decided against it... The caption does say "A plethora of Erniettas from the Pflug monographs (1972-1974) in which many names were proposed for what is likely related to the manner in which one, or a very few, living species produced the fossils."

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