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Innocentx

Is this barnacle fossilized?

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Innocentx

As @ynot observed, there is no matrix adhering.  @caldigger suggested above, the post facto application of cheese matrix. If velveeta, would that make my 'fossil' young again?

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Plantguy
On 5/18/2018 at 7:55 PM, Innocentx said:

I found this some years back at Pescadero Beach in California. I don't know if it's fossilized but if it is I think it would be from the Tertiary. Any help much appreciated.

 

 

 

Sorry I didnt mean to hijack this thread with my earlier comment. I should have added that we find a number of larger barnacles here in Florida as well that are indeed fossil and some do show up looking pretty clean and others full of sediment and/or in matrix. Nice find! 

Regards, Chris 

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Innocentx

@Plantguy. Don't know why you thought you hijacked anything as your most welcome to post comments on anything I put up. My cheese comment previous to this one, was just me attempting a bit of humor. I guess if people don't know someone, it's difficult to say what's humorous and what might be the babbling of an idiot.

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ynot
1 hour ago, Innocentx said:

. I guess if people don't know someone, it's difficult to say what's humorous and what might be the babbling of an idiot.

That is what the emojis are for.:thumbsu:

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RJB
23 hours ago, Plantguy said:

Yep RB, those are mighty cool! Is there any story behind their finds...any part of the whale nearby? 

I donated those whale barns years ago.  I found them in either the Scotia Sandstone or Rio Dell Formations in northern California and yes, i did find some whale bone here and there too.

 

RB

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Boesse

So there are barnacle -bearing rocks near Pescadero but the separation is not great and the barnacles are usually in concretions, and are over a mile away from Pescadero beach itself, where most of the rocks exposed are non-fossiliferous Cretaceous turbidites. This is a modern specimen, probably Megabalanus californicus.

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Innocentx

Thanks, @Boesse.

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