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Cepholopods and Concretions of the Britton Fromation trip 3


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OK I thought the other two trip posts were getting a bit long. So I am creating  separate post for the third trip for the Britton Formation in Collin county, Texas.

 

The other 2 trips are here:

 

 

I have to write these things in segments. I'm slow at writing sometimes since I write in between chores and such (i.e. other fossil hunting trips). Sunday I had a bit of time to work on writing the rest of the trip report. I was supposed to teach a couple scout badges this weekend outdoors, but wouldn’t you know it, it started raining. I thought I’d go hunting instead because the showers looked isolated, but when I looked at the radar future cast it looks like it will be raining much of the day across the whole area I usually hunt in. So I’ll work on writing the third segment between chores and cleaning fossils. I get so easily distracted. Here it is Tuesday and I'm just getting to post it

 

I made a third trip out to the same spot with the Britton formation in the same week. Joe aka @Fruitbat and I had met at a local Mexican restaurant for dinner on Tuesday, I think it was. We live reasonably close to one another. When I met him for dinner I brought him a couple little slabs and a concretion of carboniferous plant fossils to play with. They were from my trip to Oklahoma at the end of April.  During dinner we agreed to go hunting Saturday afternoon, provided I didn't get called in during the night and would be too wiped out to go hunting. I had told Joe I prefer to split the bill and pay for our own meals. He told me that his mother would roll over in her grave if he let me do that. I told him we would talk about that at dinner, trying to hold my ground. We did talk about it, but Joe is stubborn. While I was busy telling a story or talking or something the bill came and he took the bill before I thought to grab it and he paid for both anyway. I think I will either have to be quicker to grab the check or not go to dinner again unless the terms are agreed to up front. Am I being too modern or stubborn? I don't think so, but I am not a guy and I don't get how men think on these matters. I am trying to be practical and fair. I think its a generational gap. Joe is old enough to be. . . , well, lets just say older so as to not give his age away. 

 

I go to church on Saturday and the place is only 10-15 minutes away from my church. So the plan was I would go to church and then he would meet me up in a store parking lot near the spot we were going to hunt and we would go hunting from there.

 

I was on call for my work. I have to stay within an hour’s drive of work at all times when I’m on call. I also have to have cell phone service wherever I go so my work can contact me.  Believe it or not there are places within an hour of Dallas that I cannot get service at times. So this spot was as good as any I knew of within an hour of my work and I had great cell service there. I met up with Joe and we headed out to a construction dirt pile I wanted to check out first.   I had seen it on the way to the spot last time. It was enormous. It was also part of the Eagle Ford group and probably less than 2 miles from the other spot. Sometimes I’ve found great stuff in construction piles. Sometimes they are complete duds.  I'd classify this one a dud.

 This is a picture of the location.

 

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It was dirt taken from a new housing development right next to it. The soil was brown and there were a few plates of what appeared to be Kamp Ranch here and there, but the plates were pretty much compressed shell fragments. I'm still learning my formations. Been there, done that before. I knew there were better things waiting a couple of miles away, but I thought I would give the pile the once over anyway, just in case some gem of a fossil showed up. I guess I should have known that brown soil was probably not the best indicator for good fossils within the Eagle Ford. Maybe elsewhere.  If anyone knows of brown soil in the Eagle Ford that has good fossils I'd like a little enlightening of what I might expect to find in it should I encounter brown soil in the Eagle Ford again so I don't completely discount and avoid it.  I found numerous chunks of calcite and gypsum. There was the very rare very worn oyster and I found a few fragments of septarian nodules with the typical brown and yellow to white aragonite and calcite crystals in them, but these were pretty tumbled and worn down and not freshly broken open. After looking around for maybe 30 minutes we both decided that was enough of that.

 

We headed out to the other location. We parked our vehicles. It was another blazing hot day. I had to convince Joe to bring something to drink. I was ready to put an extra Gatorade into my bag for him if he wasn't going to take one for himself. So he put one in his bag thankfully. It was over 90 degrees F. If you have read my other posts you know the issues with hydration I have had. I'm trying to turn over a new leaf. Plus the creek water out there didn't look quite so drinkable as the NSR water. That was sarcasm. The NSR is not so drinkable at all. I've come across places numerous times where you could tell the wild hogs had relieved themselves in the river by the smell. I still need to get me one of those Lifestraws. I digress. Back to the trip.

 

We started the walk to the spot. This time I brought my rubber creek boots. They are the kind you get from Home Depot that the concrete pourers use when pouring concrete. So they can handle a creek pretty well, but they are a bit hot. We got to the place where the avalanche had happened and Joe wanted to explore the little creek below where the avalanche had happen. The small creek ran along the road. I can't remember if I mentioned that there were a few trees along the creek that had been taken down by beavers. One was one of the largest trees I've ever seen taken down by a beaver. It must have been over 12 inches in diameter. It made me wonder how many beavers died in felling trees. Within the creek there were some areas the water was shallow and the banks were high with lots of exposed rock and soil. I had explored it before.  We didn’t really find anything other than the non-Cretaceous oysters.

 

Just as we were about to the other creek where the hunt would begin I got a message from my work giving me a heads up that there was a deceased donor sample coming in for a pediatric, 2 month old heart transplant. I would need to go and work on that when they knew the ETA. I can't remember if I have ever posted my profession. I work in a lab and am a Histoccompatibility and Immunogenetics Specialist. I specialize in tissue typing for organ and bone marrow transplants and also for disease associations with the tissue typing. I have been doing that for 21 years in the same lab. Anyway, my work didn’t have the ETA yet they were just giving me advance notice. It had already been delayed twice.  I was pretty hot and so bright I couldn't read my messages on my phone. So I found a shady spot to be able to read my messages.  I  sat down on the edge of a concrete slab poured to prevent erosion. It was a peaceful little place with the water running over the rocks. A tree was perched on the edge of the bank above me. I snapped this pic of Joe while I was sitting there reading my messages, replying and waiting for the response. 

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We went on hunting while I waited to hear back on the ETA of the heart donor's tissue. Joe was the first to find something. He found a pretty little red ammonite about 1.5 inches across with a bit of matrix still on it. It was probably less than 30 feet from where Joe is in this pic. He offered it to me. I told him no way that it was his little memento of the hunt. If he found nothing else worthy of keeping that little beauty was worthy of keeping. I didn't get a pic of it. Maybe Joe can provide one.

 

We continued with the hunt. I am not fast about covering ground while hunting, but I definitely move faster than Joe.  Shortly after we got into the creek and began to hunt I got a call from the on call supervisor at my work telling me that the sample would be there around 6:00. That meant I had maybe 45 minutes left to hunt. We’d only been in the creek maybe 10 minutes max.

 

Since I knew my time hunting would be cut short I was trying to cover more ground. I soon left Joe inspecting an exposure and moved on to another exposure further down the creek. I found a number of ammonite fragments. I found several halves of ammonites. Here are a few of them.

The two ammonite halves were within 1 inch of each other along with the baculite fragment. I assume they are both Metoicoceras of some kind. Please chime in if you know what they are.

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I think this one must be a Placenticeras pseudoplacenta var. occidentale. Please help educate me if I am misidentifying them. I am very new at this. Sometimes I assume a species based on what I know is in the formation if it kind of looks like it. I am doing that with this one. I don't know of another smooth genus in the Britton.

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I also found a few more interesting bulbous concretion. Almost all of the concretion material are flat little slabs of rock not more than ½ to 1 inch thick, but occasionally you find little odd shaped ones or bumpy ones. I picked some of them up hoping I can figure out how to expose whatever may be inside. I found a few more baculite pieces. I found the longest fragment I had found. I also found a few tiny gastropods. Very cute and tiny. Here are pics of all the baculite fragments found over the 3 days. I am probably not the idea naturalist for combining the fossils from 3 hunts within a week from the same local. The largest fragment I did find when I hunted with Joe.

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This is one of the fragments. When it is wet it looks like shiny copper. When dry it looks like a metallic rose gold.  It is lovely piece. I have a few others that have flecks of it on them. A few have a rainbow kind of hue.

 

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OK I am trying to break up my posts for this trip so I can include more pictures. Bare with me. More is coming.

Oops left out a pic description. These are a number of the fragments I found that day with the exception of the Placenticeras ones.

 

IMG_7745.jpg

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WhodamanHD

Nice finds and great report! So many baculites! The first part reminds me of the traditional end of meal ritual during my families get-togethers where each families Matriarch or Patriarch (and the grandparents) scrambles to pay the bill before everyone else, The feeling of being generous and kind outweighs that of fairness or practicality, which is not too bad of a thing.:)

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Great trip report Kim (as usual).  I thoroughly enjoyed the trip! 

 

A few things I need to clarify:

 

  1. If you think I'm stubborn now...just wait until you try to pay for dinner! :D  By the way...not having dinner with me is NOT an option!  Just remember...old age and treachery will always overcome youth and skill!
  2. I'm not THAT old! :D  I'm a mere 761 months old.  Old enough, however, to treasure the way I was raised back in the 'good old days', when men were gentlemen and women were glad of it! (LOL!)
  3. Was it really over 90oF?  It didn't feel like it!  I hardly broke a sweat.  There was a nice breeze.
  4. I may be slow...but I'm usually pretty sure! (It also cuts down on the sweating!)
  5. The little red ammonite I found appears to be Metiococeras sp.  Unfortunately, I haven't taken a picture of it yet.
  6. I picked up a few of the baculite fragments too...but nowhere near as many as you did!

I definitely want to hit THAT spot again!  It has potential!

 

-Joe

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28 minutes ago, KimTexan said:

Am I being too modern or stubborn?

Yes you are- I would also not let you pay for dinner.

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@Fruitbat Joe I think Kim @KimTexan can be stubborn, but I agree, don’t let her pay for dinner. Looks like you two had fun, hopefully someday soon I can get down there and collect with you two, then you and I could split the bill. :)

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It's not a commentary on the capability of the 'modern' woman to pay the bill.  I'm retired and on a fixed salary so Kim undoubtedly makes more money on a monthly basis than I do! (Of course...I do have a fairly healthy bit of money salted away for a rainy day.) That's just the way I was raised...and I'm perfectly happy being a social 'dinosaur'! Anyway...old habits die hard!

 

Of course, I'm not going to divulge the location of any of Kim's sites...but I have a feeling that she'd be more than happy to escort you to some of the 'good spots' if you ever get down in this direction.

 

-Joe

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20 minutes ago, Fruitbat said:

Great trip report Kim (as usual).  I thoroughly enjoyed the trip! 

 

A few things I need to clarify:

 

  1. If you think I'm stubborn now...just wait until you try to pay for dinner! :D  By the way...not having dinner with me is NOT an option!  Just remember...old age and treachery will always overcome youth and skill!
  2. I'm not THAT old! :D  I'm a mere 761 months old.  Old enough, however, to treasure the way I was raised back in the 'good old days', when men were gentlemen and women were glad of it! (LOL!)
  3. Was it really over 90oF?  It didn't feel like it!  I hardly broke a sweat.  There was a nice breeze.
  4. I may be slow...but I'm usually pretty sure! (It also cuts down on the sweating!)
  5. The little red ammonite I found appears to be Metiococeras sp.  Unfortunately, I haven't taken a picture of it yet.
  6. I picked up a few of the baculite fragments too...but nowhere near as many as you did!

I definitely want to hit THAT spot again!  It has potential!

 

-Joe

My goodness, that got a feisty response! I wasn't expecting such a lively dialogue on the topic.  Hum, I'm not ready to admit defeat or surrender. ;) But at the same time I do wish to be considerate of other's sensitivities, culture and generations. But, bwhaha I can be stubborn and feisty too. :D I admittedly am horrible at debates or battles of whit.  I just don't think quick enough at times. I always think about the right response after the conversation is over.

 

Today was a good example. I had a tire that had a bulge on the side. The tires were 55,000 mile tires. I'd driven 30,000. I went to get it replaced. The guy told me that my tread was low, at 2 something and I needed to replace it. I asked about prorating the cost of the replacement. He said he couldn't prorate it because he didn't have proof of my regular rotations. I texted a guy friend about the situation who is very knowledgeable about such thing. The first thing out of his mouth was "the bulge has nothing to do with rotation. You should get it prorated for that." Why didn't I think of that argument first thing? I felt it should have been prorated too, but I couldn't think of a good defense for my position at the moment. I did go speak to another person at the counter and he set the matter right for me and did prorate the cost of the tire.

Auto care always intimidates me. It isn't that I don't know anything. I use to do a lot of my own repairs before cars got so fancy. I use to do my own tune ups, replace spark plugs, replaced voltage regulator, water pump, alternators before and rebuilt a carburetor once. I can change a flat tire in 11 minutes once. Times myself in 103 degree heat one day while I was running late for an appointment. I'm not sure why, but there are a number of mechanics out there that intentionally take advantage of women regarding car care. I've sent my husband or dad to go deal with them after they did me wrong and they make the matter right. That is one of the times it is frustrating being a woman. The other one for me is lack of adequate muscle to complete the job sometimes. The last has something to do with the dinner bill. Just kidding on the last point. 

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35 minutes ago, Fruitbat said:

It's not a commentary on the capability of the 'modern' woman to pay the bill.  I'm retired and on a fixed salary so Kim undoubtedly makes more money on a monthly basis than I do! (Of course...I do have a fairly healthy bit of money salted away for a rainy day.) That's just the way I was raised...and I'm perfectly happy being a social 'dinosaur'! Anyway...old habits die hard!

 

Of course, I'm not going to divulge the location of any of Kim's sites...but I have a feeling that she'd be more than happy to escort you to some of the 'good spots' if you ever get down in this direction.

 

-Joe

Absolutely, I would take people hunting if they wanted to come visit. @Herb came for a visit in March I think and I took him and a friend of his out hunting to one of my places. One thing I learned as a southern girl is southern hospitality. I use to do a pretty good job of playing up the southern bell accent. I really have more of a Midwestern accent. Use to listen to Dan Rather as a kid and I liked his accent. Funny I know. I lived in Arkansas in the deep woods for a number of years and I absolutely did not want a deep woods Arkansas accent. Sorry, no offense if you have a deep woods Arkansas accent. I love the people, not the accent.

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Another nice trip report and some wonderful finds.

 

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doushantuo

Some good reporting & documentation here,Kim.

in other words:"sound journalism" :dinothumb:

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Hi Kim!

 

I'm with you re: paying for dinner (sorry guys!).  I let my husband pay for the first dinner or two when we started dating, but then I insisted on taking turns, and that's pretty much how we've handled things ever since.  Perhaps it is a generational thing (I'm 40), but since I was able to contribute back then and still am able to do so, I like paying my way rather than always having someone else (a man) pay for me.  Now, if Joe is especially insistent on paying, then perhaps you can contribute in other ways (i.e. bring him more fossils :P)

 

Beautiful Baculites (again)!!!  If I ever get down to Texas I will definitely let you know... (And if you're ever up here in the Toronto area, please do let me know, too - we don't have Baculites up here but we do have other fossil goodies to find :))

 

Monica

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Hiya Monica!  Come down to Texas and I'll buy you dinner (chuckling)!

 

-Joe

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10 hours ago, Monica said:

I'm with you re: paying for dinner

Come to California and I will let You buy Me dinner.:thumbsu:

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we had a nice time collecting with Kim, it was generous of her to show us some sites. Thanks again Kim.

You are always welcome in Louisville.

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OK the rest of the story. Sorry it has taken me so long to get this all posted. 

 

I decided I better start making my way back down the creek and meet up with Joe. I could see him the whole time not far from where we entered the creek. I think he only goes hunting with me for the company, but I am not much company when I leave him behind and go trotting off down the creek in search of fossils.  He isn’t into Cretaceous stuff. I’m not sure he picked up anything other than the little ammonite he found. He is a Pleistocene mammal man.

 

Pleistocene must be a bit harder to come by in these parts of Texas. I have done a lot of hunting and never come across any Pleistocene stuff other than maybe oysters and clams. But I am always in search of Cretaceous stuff like cephalopods, echinoids and gastropods. I am sure the Pleistocene  fossils are around, because the Perot Museum, formerly the Dallas Museum of Natural History has quite a few from the Dallas area. Also, I see people finding stuff occasionally on the Dallas Paleontological Society Facebook group page and here. So it is here. Back to the trip.

 

While out there I also found several tiny and adorable gastropods.

The first and last of the gastropods here look the same. I have 3 other gastropods just like them. 2 are on the cephalopod hash plate

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This gastropod looks squattier than the others. It is inside of an Inoceramus clam fossil. There is a bivalve to the left of it. To the right and on the bottom is the end of a baculite or two sticking out. Above that is the kind of crescent shaped end of what I believe is an Allocrioceras ammonite. I broke of the fragile end when I was trying to expose more of the specimens inside the clam. There is a good sized Allocrioceras a on top of the clam.

IMG_7751.thumb.jpg.5132b0ce39a9e11ca416ce7339b0fbaf.jpg

 

Sorry this is so fuzzy, but you get the gist of the gastropod. I don't know my gastropods at all. I don't have any reference books or papers to familiarize myself with them, but I need to. I do like gastropods. They are in my top 5 favorite fossils.

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This one needs a little more cleaning to bring it out more. I  have so many other cool things to keep my attention though.

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I met back up with Joe in the creek and we started walking  back down to our entry point. Along the way I found another couple ammonite fragments one from a different genus.  I may have found another fragment of one of them earlier, but it was red and much smaller than this one and very flat. This one was from a different layer and formation though. It was a harder more limestone to chert type material and tan in color. It actually looked like it may have been part of a septarian nodule.

 

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How the sides are encrusted and the ends too with a calcium silica looking substance makes me think it was once in a septarian nodule or something. I have no idea what species this might be. When I was looking to ID things I was looking at the Sciponoceras gracile zone of the Britton Formation. I don't recall anything that fit this description, but then again I am just getting to know the genus of cephalopods found in this area.

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We got to the muddy part. I stepped across in my rubber boots without getting stuck in the mud. Joe was behind me. He sunk in the mud. He pulled his feet out and worked at wiping off his shoes.

It was time for me to go. He said he needed a rest before walking back. His legs give him trouble. He said he was fine and that it was OK for me to go back so I could get to work. So we parted ways I walked back and headed into work.

 

A week later I took the time to rinse off the fossils and concretions I had found over the last 3 trips. As I was rinsing them off I looked at one I’d picked up and realized I could see the thorax of a crab! I was so excited. I have never found a crab or crustacean. I started looking at the other concretions I had picked up that were of similar shape. I found 7 of similar shape and size and 5 of them clearly had crabs inside. I could see either the anterolateral teeth or appendages showing on them.

 

Funny thing is that I didn’t look at the concretions that were that much bigger. Yesterday I was looking at some of the other concretions and found one that was about 3 times the size of the others. Part of a carpus and propodus were protruding from the concretions. Squeal!  It will take quite a while to remove the matrix to see what is inside, but I am excited to find out what they look like.

 

I will post the crabs next. Don't get your hopes up. I haven't really begun to processed them. The cephalopod hash plate has taken up most of my attention. It is the coolest find of all to me.

 

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Here are some of the crabs. They are not too obvious though. This is the one that made me realize that I had crabs.

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This is the one that I found in the box of concretions I had picked up. I had never seen that it had a crab in it. Part of the carpus and propodus are sticking out on the bottom right.

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I forgot to mention that @Uncle Siphuncle, I think it was, but could have been someone else too that says these are Ferroranina dichrous crabs. Hope I am spelling that correctly.

Edited by KimTexan
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I found this too. When I picked it up it was inside of a concretion. I just thought it was a baculite fragment. I am not sure if it is just my imagination or what, but the concretion fell off after it dried and when I picked it up I thought it looked a little like a crustacean. What do you all think? Crustacean or baculite fragment?

 

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See the little dots on the negative? That does not look like baculite to me, but if it is a crustacean it looks too long and does not taper like I'd expect it too. Maybe it is part of a type of cephalopod that I am not familiar with. There are a number of heteromorphy cephalopods in the formation. I think I have at 3 species of them in my cephalopod hash plate.

IMG_7871.thumb.jpg.d0eabcac8c611471bdea4f64485ed71d.jpg

 

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Keep in mind that there are lobsters out there too!

 

-Joe

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Tidgy's Dad

Indeed, lovely gastropods and the crabs are super finds too! :)

Terrific report as usual, Kim, love your writing style. 

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20 minutes ago, Fruitbat said:

Keep in mind that there are lobsters out there too!

 

-Joe

Yes that is what I was considering, but after looking at pictures of lobsters I don't think it is one.

 

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12 minutes ago, Tidgy's Dad said:

Indeed, lovely gastropods and the crabs are super finds too! :)

Terrific report as usual, Kim, love your writing style. 

Thank you Adam.

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On ‎5‎/‎22‎/‎2018 at 9:35 PM, Nimravis said:

@Fruitbat Joe I think Kim @KimTexan can be stubborn, but I agree, don’t let her pay for dinner. Looks like you two had fun, hopefully someday soon I can get down there and collect with you two, then you and I could split the bill. :)

I'd be glad to take you to a few of my spots, but I can't say that I am that good at finding vertebrates. If it is ammonites, echinoids, gastropods or septarian nodules you're after I can help there. I know of a few purportedly good shark teeth spots, but I am not terribly successful in that area either. I do know a good place for micros though.

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Uncle Siphuncle

A couple taxa to look up images for comparison.  Smooth ammos:  Placenticeras cumminsi.  Low spired gastropods:  Natica sp.

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Uncle Siphuncle

F. dichrous is the most common crustacean in the Britton.  You can never have too many.  My buddy Brent amassed about 500 over the years, now at SMU.   Even bigger at times is Cenomanocarcinus (vanstraeleni?)  There are also shrimp, maybe Upogebia. Lobsters include Astracodes and Linuparis. Àlex Osso probably knows of some oddballs that round out the faunal list.

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  • Fossildude19 changed the title to Cepholopods and Concretions of the Britton Fromation trip 3

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