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dinodigger

Seymour formation lower pleistocene near Seymour, texas. Bovine on right, who is on left?

20180525_143850.jpg

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Spinosaurus

the left one im not sure, we dont see the 'real' top of the teeth (matrix blocks it or they are really worn)

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I would need to see a side view but quite potentially a elderly camelops

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Bovine has a stylid, an extra wrinkle that camelops doesn't have.

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WhodamanHD

I’m not good with mammal teeth but the left almost reminds me of a rhino tooth. @Harry Pristis

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This is my senile camelops.  The small black circle is where the stylid is missing.  This was found in the southern Brazos, so the age of mine is late Pleistocene.Camelops.jpg.ed345f4b96ce562ed4f58f8834a0af91.jpg

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Uncle Siphuncle
1 hour ago, WhodamanHD said:

I’m not good with mammal teeth but the left almost reminds me of a rhino tooth. @Harry Pristis

If definitely Pleistocene, this rules out rhino in North America.  Senile Camelops is a reasonable possibility.

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dinodigger

Thanks so much for the direction. Starting to work a site with a ton of oddities. Here is a side view of the jaw.

20180519_151047.jpg

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One other thing that I didn't say was that my tooth row measures right at 6 inches. Your photo looks to me at least like camelops.

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WhodamanHD
2 hours ago, Uncle Siphuncle said:

If definitely Pleistocene, this rules out rhino in North America.  Senile Camelops is a reasonable possibility.

Just looked it up, and I find it strange. I guess all those Miocene rhinos died before and didn’t leave any relatives, and the woolly rhino stayed in Asia.  

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Harry Pristis

 

In the initial comparison image, the occlusal surfaces don't seem to be held in the same focal plane, making the wxtremely worn bovid jaw appear larger.  The missing isolated stylids can be explained by the excessive wear on the teeth -- they're just worn past the base of the stylids.  My best guess.

 

 

 

 

cow_m3_stylid.JPG

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Harry-

I believe these are both m2 (lower jaw), from adult camelops and bison respectively.  The central loop is quite different between each, with the camel  being more open as you can see hints of in Dinodigger's  m3 (this is faint but still visible).  Tooth size is larger in the camel, although the tooth narrows at the base, which means that the tooth row actually gets shorter as the individuals age.

My reading seems to indicate that the stylid in bovines turns from a circle into a loop with age but really doesn't disappear.

 

I'm not sure if you have camelops in Florida, but they are reasonably common in Texas. Pictured tooth of Camelops is 43mm, Bison is 35mm wide. (and incidentally 76mm and 58mm long)

-these are much larger than your puny llama teeth found in Florida.:)

 

 

5b09bef39a853_camelopsbison.thumb.JPG.dd9ae992c73f929d4fd34dc75803ebb5.JPG

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