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Angus Stydens

Difference between fossil wahoo and barracuda teeth

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Angus Stydens

I often hear collectors identify a certain type of fish tooth as "either wahoo or barracuda", but I have never seen any photos, articles, books, etc. that show how to tell the difference between the two types of teeth. I know that there are positional variations, but beyond that, are many of the teeth very similar for both species, making them easy to misidentify? Or is there a way to easily distinguish between them? I am referring to specimens collected in the Oligocene beds of S.C. if that helps any. Photos or illustrations would be helpful.

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sixgill pete

http://www.elasmo.com/

 

Click this link, then in the top banner click Lee-Creek. Then under Lee-Creek a.k.a. Aurora click on "The teleosts" (fish) scroll down and you will see pics of barracuda and wahoo teeth.

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Angus Stydens

Thanks. I took a quick look at the photos they had for each species, but they did not have a good photo of a fossil jaw section from a barracuda. I am in a debate with someone over the difficulty or lack of difficulty in discerning between a lateral tooth from both a wahoo and a barracuda. They both appear spade-like in shape, but I was wondering if there were any readily recognizable features on the two species that makes it relatively easy to tell them apart. Especially when you are looking at unworn, shed-teeth from each species.

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Al Dente

Wahoo teeth are very thick at the base of the enamel. Barracuda are thin. Most modern or fairly recent barracuda teeth are larger than wahoo teeth.

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Angus Stydens

Thanks for your answer. Is the difference in the thickness of the base of the tooth (in comparison between the two types of fish) easily recognizable when the tooth is in a section of jaw?

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tatehntr

I have no knowledge to offer but had to say I love your username on here @Angus Stydens

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Angus Stydens

Thanks.  I have been collecting c.angustidens teeth for many years in S.C. and one day it occurred to me that it would make a great "nom de plume." I have been using it for years. 

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Al Dente
40 minutes ago, Angus Stydens said:

Thanks for your answer. Is the difference in the thickness of the base of the tooth (in comparison between the two types of fish) easily recognizable when the tooth is in a section of jaw?

Yes. The wahoo tooth is at it’s thickest where it meets the jaw. 

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