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Permian fossils from Krasnoufimsk, Russia

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Tidgy's Dad

 Very interesting. :)

Thanks for posting! 

As I've said before, we get to see very few Permian or Russian fossils so this is a treat!  

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procurator
13 minutes ago, Tidgy's Dad said:

 Very interesting. :)

Thanks for posting! 

As I've said before, we get to see very few Permian or Russian fossils so this is a treat!  

Thank you!

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WhodamanHD

Nice finds, that Permian trilo is a rare sight indeed!

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Spongy Joe

Very interesting site, thank you!

Is that a Glossopteris leaf? And to have sharks, ammonoids, trilobites and beautifully preserved land plants together is quite strange... are they all in the same beds?

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Foozil
10 hours ago, Spongy Joe said:

Very interesting site, thank you!

Is that a Glossopteris leaf? And to have sharks, ammonoids, trilobites and beautifully preserved land plants together is quite strange... are they all in the same beds?

Not glossopteris, they don't occur in Russia. (or not?) 

Nice finds!

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Spongy Joe

Shows how much I know about Permian plants, then! :P

 

Actually, it turns out that there are a few Glossopterisi-ish leaves from parts of Siberia... but it obviously wasn't normal. I wonder what this one is..?

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procurator
2 hours ago, Spongy Joe said:

Very interesting site, thank you!

Is that a Glossopteris leaf? And to have sharks, ammonoids, trilobites and beautifully preserved land plants together is quite strange... are they all in the same beds?

I wrote about permian plants in TFF. You can find it in Chekarda, It's another place)

 

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Ludwigia

Thanks for posting this. Did you ever find a Helicoprion spiral here yourself?

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procurator
Just now, Ludwigia said:

Thanks for posting this. Did you ever find a Helicoprion spiral here yourself?

No, I was here only one time ((

My friend from permian age museum found this, and this is hard work

0_1da041_eb096a01_orig.jpg.ff268b82a42cea885d39c203ae7bd5a6.jpg

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Troodon

Very nice thanks for posting nice to see the locality always wanted to see it..  I will have to post some of my shark teeth from the area.

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piranha
8 hours ago, Foozil said:

Not glossopteris, they don't occur in Russia. 

 

 

Apparently, there is new evidence for Glossopteris in China, Mongolia and Russia.

 

text from:

 

Naugolnykh, S.V., & Uranbileg, L., 2017

A new discovery of Glossopteris in southeastern Mongolia as an argument for distant migration of Gondwanan plants.

Journal of Asian Earth Sciences,  154;142-148   PDF LINK

 

Originally these leaves were described as Pursongia mongolica Neuburg.  After preliminary revision, Pursongia mongolica Neuburg was transferred to Glossopteris to form the new combination Glossopteris mongolica (Neuburg) Zimina (1967); for a general discussion about Angaran Pursongia and Glossopteris please see (Naugolnykh, 2001).  These data were confirmed later by Uranbileg (2001).  The southern part of the Russian Far-East was considered as a possible source of these allied elements, because the Permian floras of this region also contain putative Gondwana elements, such as Glossopteris and Gangamopteris (Zimina, 1967).  Recently, Glossopteris leaves have also reported from the neighboring areas of Northern China, i.e. the Jiefangcun flora (Yang et al., 2011).  However, we argue, that the direction of migration of Glossopteris was completely different.  We suggest, that the Khatan-Bulag terrain was on the dispersal path from Gondwana to the Russian Far-East along the western coast of Permian Paleo-Tethys (Fig. 5).

 

Zimina, V.G. 1967

About Glossopteris and Gangamopteris from Permian deposits of South Primorye.

Paleontological Journal, 2:113-121

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Foozil
2 hours ago, piranha said:

 

 

Apparently, there is new evidence for Glossopteris in China, Mongolia and Russia.

 

text from:

 

Naugolnykh, S.V., & Uranbileg, L., 2017

A new discovery of Glossopteris in southeastern Mongolia as an argument for distant migration of Gondwanan plants.

Journal of Asian Earth Sciences,  154;142-148   PDF LINK

 

Originally these leaves were described as Pursongia mongolica Neuburg.  After preliminary revision, Pursongia mongolica Neuburg was transferred to Glossopteris to form the new combination Glossopteris mongolica (Neuburg) Zimina (1967); for a general discussion about Angaran Pursongia and Glossopteris please see (Naugolnykh, 2001).  These data were confirmed later by Uranbileg (2001).  The southern part of the Russian Far-East was considered as a possible source of these allied elements, because the Permian floras of this region also contain putative Gondwana elements, such as Glossopteris and Gangamopteris (Zimina, 1967).  Recently, Glossopteris leaves have also reported from the neighboring areas of Northern China, i.e. the Jiefangcun flora (Yang et al., 2011).  However, we argue, that the direction of migration of Glossopteris was completely different.  We suggest, that the Khatan-Bulag terrain was on the dispersal path from Gondwana to the Russian Far-East along the western coast of Permian Paleo-Tethys (Fig. 5).

 

Zimina, V.G. 1967

About Glossopteris and Gangamopteris from Permian deposits of South Primorye.

Paleontological Journal, 2:113-121

Well there you go. I stand corrected :) 

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piranha
27 minutes ago, Foozil said:

Well there you go. I stand corrected :) 

 

 

We all stand corrected... the classic diagram needs a makeover! emo73.gif :P

 

IMG1.png.9f75b7811bdcdce19217f7ef415e2b90.png

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procurator
14 hours ago, Troodon said:

Very nice thanks for posting nice to see the locality always wanted to see it..  I will have to post some of my shark teeth from the area.

It would be interesting. My friends promised to send a photo of the unwritten teeth to akla for you. but have not yet been sent (

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Wrangellian
On 5/30/2018 at 3:41 AM, Spongy Joe said:

Very interesting site, thank you!

Is that a Glossopteris leaf? And to have sharks, ammonoids, trilobites and beautifully preserved land plants together is quite strange... are they all in the same beds?

I don't know about the Permian, but you probably know that land plants can be found with marine fossils in other places - Leaves and conifer fronds are fairly common together with marine fauna in my local Cretaceous shales.

 

Here on TFF we don't see as much Permian anything compared to the earlier Paleozoic and later Mesozoic and Cenozoic stuff, so it's nice to see! (Triassic is also poorly represented I think)

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Spongy Joe
57 minutes ago, Wrangellian said:

I don't know about the Permian, but you probably know that land plants can be found with marine fossils in other places - Leaves and conifer fronds are fairly common together with marine fauna in my local Cretaceous shales.

 

Here on TFF we don't see as much Permian anything compared to the earlier Paleozoic and later Mesozoic and Cenozoic stuff, so it's nice to see! (Triassic is also poorly represented I think)

Yeah, I do realise that... but normally when I've seen it, there have been rather scrappy plant remains or a very marginal-looking marine fauna. To have trilobites implies (I think) totally normal open marine salinity (little or no river input), and with big ammonoids as well, combined with beautiful little leaves... well, that's some delicate material that's come quite a long way and is preserved like the stuff in lake deposits. It's probably nothing - it just strikes me as odd, based on what I've seen before.

 

Agree it's nice to see some diverse Permian; most of the UK's is desert, with just a bit of reefy stuff. :)

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Wrangellian

Yes, my leaves are nicely preserved (not perfectly) and the marine is too. Neither are scrappy.

 

Are those dark spots trace fossils on those pieces?

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procurator

Thx for posting! Realy cool fossils.

Similar teeth of the same genera are found in the Moscow Carboniferous. 

 

20.jpg

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procurator

Today I'm flying back to Krasnoufimsk for 4 days. Soon there will be many new photos and fossils!

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Wrangellian

:popcorn:

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procurator

Hello! I'm back! I found a lot of fossils in Krasnoufimsk, but I didn't unpacked them. I'll be posting photos slowly.

 

Today I want to show a extreme rare permian's trilobite Pseudophillipsia sp. Trilobite is whole.

 

IMG_3190.JPG

IMG_3193-1.jpg

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procurator

Unfortunately, the trilobites's head is broken. But It's realy very good trilobite from Krasnoufimsk
 

IMG_3202.JPG

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