The tide tables for the Bank Holiday weekend suggested we should perhaps make a return visit to Beltinge to search for more sharks teeth, but the weather forecast put us off; predicted onshore winds would probably hold the water in the estuary preventing the best parts of the beach from being uncovered. So, having been offered the use of a caravan on the north Norfolk coast, we decided a change of scene would be interesting and looked forward to the challenge of a new beach to search.   East Runton and West Runton beaches are famous for their geology and wealth of fossils. Rocks from the Cretaceous onwards are present and a wide variety of finds can be made if conditions are favourable. Several recent postings on social media showed some lovely mammoth teeth and other bones had been found, probably brought ashore by the strong north-easterly winds during the winter and early spring.   Due to other commitments we didn't arrive until late on Sunday night. The following morning we were greeted by bright sunshine but there was no rush to get down to the beach as the tide wasn't due to uncover the foreshore until late morning. After a leisurely breakfast we headed down to the beach. Unfortunately for most of the holidaymakers, the northerly breeze had brought thick fog off the sea and it clung to the coast, turning the conditions decidedly cold and damp - not good for making sandcastles and having picnics, but fine for fossil hunting! The majority of the morning visitors had abandoned the beach and we had the place pretty much to ourselves.   Looking east towards Cromer. Not much sign of spring bank holiday visitors!