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Masp

Hell Creek Info: Best books?

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Masp

 I was inspired to post this after reading all of the mixed opinions on previous thread on the “Fossils from Hell Creek, Carthage Institute” book. 

 

Which books currently (accurate and as of date) are the best for learning about Hell Creek Fossils? 

 

Best visuals, info, and overall great reference. 

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doushantuo

Here's my two cents worth: given that dinosaur paleontology and largescale commerce (media attention & all that)have been mixing for a long time now,which trend has a tendency to keep funds for research running,  you run the risk of a book being reasonably quickly outdated.

In other words : if you own ANY large book on ANY fossil group ,keep reminding yourself that new insights (can) come reasonably thick and fast

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Auspex

<LINK>

Enjoy!

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Masp
44 minutes ago, Auspex said:

<LINK>

Enjoy!

Thanks!

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piranha

This recent publication is excellent :fistbump:

 

Wilson, G.P., Clemens, W.A., Horner, J.R., & Hartman, J.H. (eds) 2014

Through the end of the Cretaceous in the type locality of the Hell Creek Formation in Montana and adjacent areas.

Geological Society of America Special Paper, 503:1-392

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Troodon

What specifically ard you trying to learn geology, identification of its fossils, history,  etc?

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Masp
1 hour ago, Troodon said:

What specifically ard you trying to learn geology, identification of its fossils, history,  etc?

Frank,  thanks for chiming in ... primarily fossil ID.  But all of the above wouldn’t hurt too. :D

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Masp

 Now that you mention geology ,  would be really helpful also  to know of a good book in general for learning the ins and outs geology so I can be  more knowledgeable wherever I go, and especially navigate better in New Jersey @Troodon

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Masp

 Roadside geology of New Jersey is very good , enjoyed it, but for geology background I may need to start a little simpler.  

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Troodon

Unfortunately there are no books that focus in the identification of Hell Creek Fossils.   The best references are those focused in other areas that are similar to Hell Creek Material.  My library includes these books, PDF's of HC material/Taxons, SVP Memoir's and tons of photos of Sketal material taken at places like the Black Hills Institute.

 

The other issue you face is that not much is described in the HC and most technical publications focus on Trex, Ceratopsians, Thescelosaurus and Anky.  With the other described species very little is known or published and several are described from just a few bones or are tooth taxons.

 

I put this topic out a while back about the best Dino books out there for identification.  I also have a number of topics in how to identify HC teeth and claws if your are interested.

 

Let me recommend the Common Guide to Cretaceous Fossils of Alberta.   Most of the information has strong affinities to HC material.  I can photo a few pages if that helps.

If you are interested in theropod teeth Dinosaur Systamatics is good book.

 

 

This is also a good very high level guide on HC

Screenshot_20180608-102222.thumb.jpg.8de06db8a909f727d7acb3b3d958b949.jpg

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=http://digfieldschool.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/Fossil-ID-Guide_06_28_12.pdf&ved=2ahUKEwic7q7RxMTbAhX4GTQIHQLaDmkQFjAAegQIAxAB&usg=AOvVaw0Xiv3Rr_gnBGm3czljPc6C

 

 

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The Amateur Paleontologist

Anzu wylieiLamanna etal(2014)_Anzu.pdf

 

Sorry that they're not really "books" - hope this helped anyway. You can PM me your email address if you would like a few more papers - some of them are too big to be posted on TFF

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Masp
8 hours ago, Troodon said:

Unfortunately there are no books that focus in the identification of Hell Creek Fossils.   The best references are those focused in other areas that are similar to Hell Creek Material.  My library includes these books, PDF's of HC material/Taxons, SVP Memoir's and tons of photos of Sketal material taken at places like the Black Hills Institute.

 

The other issue you face is that not much is described in the HC and most technical publications focus on Trex, Ceratopsians, Thescelosaurus and Anky.  With the other described species very little is known or published and several are described from just a few bones or are tooth taxons.

 

I put this topic out a while back about the best Dino books out there for identification.  I also have a number of topics in how to identify HC teeth and claws if your are interested.

 

Let me recommend the Common Guide to Cretaceous Fossils of Alberta.   Most of the information has strong affinities to HC material.  I can photo a few pages if that helps.

If you are interested in theropod teeth Dinosaur Systamatics is good book.

 

 

This is also a good very high level guide on HC

Screenshot_20180608-102222.thumb.jpg.8de06db8a909f727d7acb3b3d958b949.jpg

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=http://digfieldschool.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/Fossil-ID-Guide_06_28_12.pdf&ved=2ahUKEwic7q7RxMTbAhX4GTQIHQLaDmkQFjAAegQIAxAB&usg=AOvVaw0Xiv3Rr_gnBGm3czljPc6C

 

 

This publication looks excellent..thank you so much..

 

 I’ve also been meaning to get Common Guide to Cretaceous Fossils of Alberta.  So I’m definitely going to get that asap.  Every convo with you is informative 

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Masp

@The Amateur Paleontologist  Can’t wait to read these. Really appreciate you going out of your way to send me all of them. Thanks a million!!!

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Troodon
51 minutes ago, Masp said:

This publication looks excellent..thank you so much..

 

 I’ve also been meaning to get Common Guide to Cretaceous Fossils of Alberta.  So I’m definitely going to get that asap.  Every convo with you is informative 

Thanks, if you're interested in a specific dino let me know and Ill see what is available

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The Amateur Paleontologist

@Masp Hey, glad you like these. About the "Guide to Common Cretaceous Fossils of Alberta", most places where it can be bought are in various museums in Canada (especially Alberta). You're not going to find it on amazon - just warning you. I myself looked for it on many places online following my fieldwork in Dinosaur Provincial Park, but didn't find it :mellow:

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Troodon
13 hours ago, The Amateur Paleontologist said:

@Masp Hey, glad you like these. About the "Guide to Common Cretaceous Fossils of Alberta", most places where it can be bought are in various museums in Canada (especially Alberta). You're not going to find it on amazon - just warning you. I myself looked for it on many places online following my fieldwork in Dinosaur Provincial Park, but didn't find it :mellow:

The pdf form to order the book my mail is attached in my topic 

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Masp
On 6/8/2018 at 10:22 PM, Troodon said:

Thanks, if you're interested in a specific dino let me know and Ill see what is available

 I should really try to be a well-rounded, but in particular theropods are my favorite from all three eras.  I just have to get  better at ID’ing teeth and bones and what not

 

You’re my go to person so  as I think of things I’ll definitely ask. 

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