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Aurelius

A few Moroccan acquisitions

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DatFossilBoy

Awesome!!!

So many spines!

Nice crystals.

regards

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Bone guy

Cool pieces! Those crystals are very cool. :D 

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indominus rex

Awesome acquisitions! I am especially fond of the Hybodus spines:).

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Tidgy's Dad

Love the Hybodus spines. :wub:

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nivek1969

very nice finds!

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Harry Pristis

 

for comparison:

 

 

crinoidfloat.jpg

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ynot

Those are some awesome acquisitions!.

Never heard of the (crinoid) float balls before.

 

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caldigger
1 hour ago, ynot said:

Those are some awesome acquisitions!.

Never heard of the float balls before.

 

I know it is a hard comparison being that one is a plant and the other an animal. But maybe they worked in a similar way to the gas bulbs on kelp, to help keep the body upright in heavy currents and minimize gravitational pull.

20180610_162345.png

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ynot
42 minutes ago, caldigger said:

know it is a hard comparison being that one is a plant and the other an animal. But maybe they worked in a similar way to the gas bulbs on kelp, to help keep the body upright in heavy currents and minimize gravitational pull.

I agree, and have been aware of the seaweed type.

Should have specified crinoid in My reply.

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Aurelius
37 minutes ago, piranha said:

 

"These curious, bladder-like structures were definitely associated with the camerate Scyphocrinites by both Jaekel and Bather around the turn of the century when the idea of their function as buoys was first proposed.  According to Bather (1907), ‘It is . . . believed by many that this swelling was hollow and served as a float from which the crinoid hung, arms downward.  The latter hypothesis explains why it is that in various parts of the world the loboliths occur unassociated with the crowns to which they are supposed to have belonged; following death, the gradual decay of the animal would cause the crown to drop off and sink to the bottom, while the lobolith floated on.’..."

 


Thanks for that! I have to say, I find these crinoids absolutely fascinating . There's something rather wonderful about the idea of these strange, alien bulbs floating around on the surface of the ocean with these remarkable creatures hanging beneath. I've seen Scyphocrinites so often, and never realised that they lived in this manner.

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RJB

Very cool!!!

 

RB

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Troodon

Nice pickups.  Cool crystals

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