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Cthulhu2

Megalodon or Great White? Gainesville, Fl

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Cthulhu2

What do you guys think? I thought great white but this root is throwing me off.

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WhodamanHD

I’m not sure that two topics are necessary, I’m sure more will reply on the first;)

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Cthulhu2
25 minutes ago, WhodamanHD said:

I’m not sure that two topics are necessary, I’m sure more will reply on the first;)

Oh I know, I'm just excited! I can't delete the first one unfortunately (but I did hide it!) :D

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WhodamanHD
45 minutes ago, Cthulhu2 said:

Oh I know, I'm just excited! I can't delete the first one unfortunately (but I did hide it!) :D

That’s fine, it’s a tooth worth excitement either way. ImAs I said in the first one, I believe it’s a meg.

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CBchiefski

The black coloration is very common in Megalodon teeth due to high levels of phosphates present in the sediments where they were deposited. Black is also very rare for Great White teeth as a recently shed tooth starts out white and takes a great deal of time to change color.

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sixgill pete

The serrations this tooth say great white to me, not megalodon.

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sixgill pete
5 minutes ago, CBchiefski said:

The black coloration is very common in Megalodon teeth due to high levels of phosphates present in the sediments where they were deposited. Black is also very rare for Great White teeth as a recently shed tooth starts out white and takes a great deal of time to change color.

This is not true. Megalodon come in all colors. Tan / cream is one of the most common colors here in N.C. even from the Lee Creek mine, which is a phosphate mine. There is a place hete in NC where black colored great whites are extremely common. 

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WhodamanHD
8 minutes ago, CBchiefski said:

Black is also very rare for Great White teeth as a recently shed tooth starts out white and takes a great deal of time to change color.

Well it is a fossil, I have one black GW fossil and another one coming in the mail. 

Edit: Sixgill Pete beat me to it.

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WhodamanHD

I should say I base my Meg prediction on the root shape. I haven’t seen a GW with that much curve in its root, though I’ve only seen a handful.

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CBchiefski
2 minutes ago, sixgill pete said:

This is not true. Megalodon come in all colors. Tan / cream is one of the most common colors here in N.C. even from the Lee Creek mine, which is a phosphate mine. There is a place hete in NC where black colored great whites are extremely common. 

 

5 minutes ago, WhodamanHD said:

Well it is a fossil, I have one black GW fossil and another one coming in the mail. 

Edit: Sixgill Pete beat me to it.

Sorry if I was unclear, am not saying they only come in black, just that is one of the most common overall in the US. Yes, Great White Teeth come in black however such color is not common generally speaking. Of course with tens of thousands of teeth found a full range of colors have been observed. There is a reason I did not state the tooth was Meg based solely on color. If you would like I can find the peer reviewed paper which came to this conclusion through looking at shark teeth across the entire US east coast.

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WhodamanHD
4 minutes ago, CBchiefski said:

If you would like I can find the peer reviewed paper which came to this conclusion through looking at shark teeth across the entire US east coast.

I’d like to see that, I have actually never seen a east coast fossil GW other than black, except one from Summerville which I believe had been bleached by plant roots.

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Cthulhu2

You know, I didn't include a side picture. Also the background change may help as well.

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The Jersey Devil

It seems like a great white to me. The serrations stick out of the crown more on great whites. Megs have serrations that are more built into the crown. It is flatter than most megs, although hubbell-shaped Megs can be flat too.

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Gizmo
33 minutes ago, CBchiefski said:

 

Sorry if I was unclear, am not saying they only come in black, just that is one of the most common overall in the US. Yes, Great White Teeth come in black however such color is not common generally speaking. Of course with tens of thousands of teeth found a full range of colors have been observed. There is a reason I did not state the tooth was Meg based solely on color. If you would like I can find the peer reviewed paper which came to this conclusion through looking at shark teeth across the entire US east coast.

I've found hundreds of modern Great White teeth, 75% are black.

Screen Shot 2018-06-26 at 9.43.26 PM.png

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Gizmo
23 minutes ago, Cthulhu2 said:

You know, I didn't include a side picture. Also the background change may help as well.

IMG_1937.PNG

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Side shot Has the symmetry of modern Great White.

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WhodamanHD
28 minutes ago, Cthulhu2 said:

IMG_1937.PNG

Yeah, I’ll switch to the white camp now, the root must’ve worn into that shape.

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WhodamanHD
19 minutes ago, Gizmo said:

I've found hundreds of modern Great White teeth, 75% are black.

Screen Shot 2018-06-26 at 9.43.26 PM.png

Those are modern!? Or do you mean modern species? Either way, those aren’t Maryland finds are they? Sorry, I’m too curious...

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bcfossilcollector

I’m no expert but I’d say Great White shark. The serrations as well as the absence of a noticeable bourlette lead me to believe it is not a Meg tooth. 

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Gizmo

 In my collection Great Whites seem to center the serrations with an equal bulge on each side. On most Megs the serrations are nearer to the non lingual side.

                       Otodus Megalodon                                                                                           Carcharodon carcharias

Screen Shot 2018-06-26 at 10.20.01 PM.png

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CBchiefski

Ok, did a bit of quick searching and the paper was actually redacted, the reason listed was a major sampling bias and I would assume that is why they came to such a conclusion. My apologies for citing an erroneous study and fully retract my statement. Am not going to list it since it is incorrect and do not want anyone else to make the same mistake I did should they came across this thread.
@sixgill pete
@Cthulhu2
@WhodamanHD
@Gizmo
@josephstrizhak
@bcfossilcollector

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Gizmo
24 minutes ago, WhodamanHD said:

Those are modern!? Or do you mean modern species? Either way, those aren’t Maryland finds are they? Sorry, I’m too curious...

Carcharodon carcharias. Screen Shot 2018-06-26 at 10.19.12 PM.pngScreen Shot 2018-06-26 at 10.19.02 PM.png

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WhodamanHD
10 minutes ago, Gizmo said:

Carcharodon carcharias. 

I understand now, very nice! 

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Gizmo
1 minute ago, WhodamanHD said:

I understand now, very nice! 

Though it's debatable if they're found in Maryland, these are from North Carolina.

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Gizmo
24 minutes ago, CBchiefski said:

Ok, did a bit of quick searching and the paper was actually redacted, the reason listed was a major sampling bias and I would assume that is why they came to such a conclusion. My apologies for citing an erroneous study and fully retract my statement. Am not going to list it since it is incorrect and do not want anyone else to make the same mistake I did should they came across this thread.
@sixgill pete
@Cthulhu2
@WhodamanHD
@Gizmo
@josephstrizhak
@bcfossilcollector

That's no problem, thanks for checking!

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WhodamanHD
4 minutes ago, Gizmo said:

The earlier Carcharodon carcharias might have more of a u shaped root.

Hastalis doesn’t usually, at least not the broad form, right?

 

11 minutes ago, Gizmo said:

Though it's debatable if they're found in Maryland, these are from North Carolina.

I figured, Maryland’s Miocene would be too early for full C. carcharias (or so I’ve been told). I have heard a few times of east coast C. hubbelli, though I’m skeptical they may be misidentified  Carcharomodus escheri (genus possibly misspelled by me).

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