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ET-REX

I think this is a tooth but what kind?

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ET-REX

I found this tooth at work in the sand in Northwest, IA. My sister had found one very simular to this one but allot smaller about 45 minutes from where I found this one at a quarry in Southeast, SD. She said it was from a prehistoric shark that only ate shelled mollusks thus the texture of the tooth that appears to be for grinding. Long story short my sister is wrong allot so I'd like to get some facts on here. I have other fossils that have yet to be identified that I will post soon. Thank you.

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Edited by ET-REX
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JimB88

not sure if thats a tooth or not..kinda looks like part of a Gonioceras, but thats just a guess on my part.

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WhodamanHD
23 minutes ago, ET-REX said:

She said it was from a prehistoric shark that only ate shelled mollusks thus the texture of the tooth that appears to be for grinding. Long story short my sister is wrong allot so I'd like to get some facts on here.

She is referring to Ptychodus, which did probably mainly eat shelled creatures (aka durophagus). This does look similar but I don’t think it is one.

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ynot

Welcome to TFF!

Looks like petrified wood to Me.

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ET-REX

JimB88, I've seen quite a few Goniocera fossils and this is quite different from all that I've seen. WhodamanHD, yeah I looked into it and what my sister has is definitely a Ptychodus tooth but mine is much different. ynot, I have an extensive petrified wood collection and nothing looks even remotely simular but who knows. The shape is fairly symmetrical and the grooves are perfectly spaces. Chances it could be a scale of some sort?

Edited by ET-REX
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JimB88
4 minutes ago, WhodamanHD said:

She is referring to Ptychodus, which did probably mainly eat shelled creatures (aka durophagus). This does look similar but I don’t think it is one.

There were actually quite a few Bradyodont sharks with crusher teeth (more of them then the fish eating variety actually.) ;)

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DPS Ammonite

The "backside" has conchoidal fracture and does not look like tooth. Do a hardness test; scratch it with a knifeblade. What happens? I bet that it is chert that may have replaced wood. Most teeth are phosphatic and are scratched by knives. 

 

It it also could be a piece of layered phosphatic chert that has differentially weathered, similar to Monterey chert in Northern and Central California.

 

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WhodamanHD

 

14 minutes ago, JimB88 said:

There were actually quite a few Bradyodont sharks with crusher teeth (more of them then the fish eating variety actually.) ;)

Not to split hairs but I believe they are not sharks. I bet there are other durophagus sharks though.

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ET-REX

So DPS Ammonite, if it scratches it is a tooth and if it does not it is chert?

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JimB88
14 minutes ago, WhodamanHD said:

 

Not to split hairs but I believe they are not sharks. I bet there are other durophagus sharks though.

Helodus and its kin led to the Hybodont sharks. The term Bradyodont refers to the structures in the teeth, and is not an indicator that they are all related. Some in fact were chimeraiformes and others were sharks.

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ynot
3 minutes ago, ET-REX said:

if it scratches it is a tooth and if it does not it is chert?

No, it is not a tooth.

DPSammonite was just pointing out that most teeth fossils are softer than a knife, but there are a lot of minerals that are softer also.

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WhodamanHD
5 minutes ago, JimB88 said:

Helodus and its kin led to the Hybodont sharks. The term Bradyodont refers to the structures in the teeth, and is not an indicator that they are all related. Some in fact were chimeraiformes and others were sharks.

Really, this isn’t my subject so I wouldn’t know. I just google Bradyodont and the internet says it refers to bradyodonti, an order of chondrichthyians (not inside selachimorpha which is what sharks are) or chaemeras. The internet, however, is known to be wrong, so I’ll take your word for it.

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DPS Ammonite
1 hour ago, ET-REX said:

So DPS Ammonite, if it scratches it is a tooth and if it does not it is chert?

If it scratches, it moves the needle toward the phosphatic stone camp (tooth?). If it does not scratch, chert is likely. Teeth are most often phosphatic rock than chert. This is not a definitive test for a tooth. It is test to ID the rock.

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